Change.org petition to Toys"R" Us

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by rjblue, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. milanessa

    milanessa engaged to dupa

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    Maat is Danish but she lives in the US right now (for work, I think.) She's out there on the west coast with you. :)
     
  2. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    :confused: You lie, woman! I remember drooling over the Toys R Us circulars in the 70s AND I went to Toys R Us after seeing "The Muppet Movie" (the first one) in the theater and I bought a Duncan Butterfly yoyo. The movie theater is long gone but that Toys R Us is still there.
     
  3. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    Well that probably explains the reasonably balance ad then. We granola types eat up that gender neutral shite. :lol:

    P.S. stores under the Toys R Us came about in the late 50s according to their web site. The first store with a different name was started in 1948.
     
  4. Alex Forrest

    Alex Forrest Banned Member

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    Did you mean 1974? I remember the Toys R Us commercials in the 70s and early 80s "I don't wanna grow up, I'm a Toys R Us kid, they have a million toys at Toys R Us that I can play with. I don't wanna grow up because maybe if I did, I couldn't be a Toys R Us kid". What an effective commercial considering I can still repeat it after 30 years.

    Here's an 80s commercial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJJ-ZLdrTwY

    ETA: Oops I see it was corrected. But does any kid from the 70s and 80s remember these commercials?
     
  5. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    uh yeah :confused: dang Toys R us was there when I was growing up though I actually never was in one as a kid! But this made me wiki it and find a piece of info particularly interesting to me and not necessarily anyone else

    Neighborhood history! The wiki entry seems to indicate that it became Toys R Us in 1957.
     
  6. milanessa

    milanessa engaged to dupa

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    I'd rather go to Madam's Organ Blues Bar than Toys R Us. :shuffle:
     
  7. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    :lol: I probably would too, although I've never been there either, despite it being 2 blocks from my house. Mostly I'd rather not go to either.

    ETA: actually Madam's Organ (for those not in the know about DC its a play on the name of the neighborhood, Adams Morgan) belongs in this thread as its painted logo outside the bar has been the object of feminist ire as being demeaning to women:

    Madam's Organ Madam and her madams...
     
  8. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    A very good year!

    Seriously? Now THAT is making a big deal about nothing.
     
  9. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    My Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner, a gay man, was quite intense about it in fact. This is quite a few years ago now.
     
  10. milanessa

    milanessa engaged to dupa

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    What is an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner? Sounds vaguely Soviet. :lol:
     
  11. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge AYS's snark-sponge

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    It does, don't tell the Tea Party about it. ;)

    Its actually a good little institution we have in D.C. We have Advisory Neighborhood Commissions with unpaid but elected commissioners that hold meetings that provide an opportunity for citizen input into all manner of local issues from parking to rats to business to public transportation and so on and so forth.
     
  12. maatTheViking

    maatTheViking Now ubering Machida's hair

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    Correct, this was a Seattle area catalog. I'm sure they are different by region.


    I find this interesting. I am. Software engineer, which is definely middle class, and I not see those wages dropping. In fact, it is still hard for companies like Microsoft and Google to hire skilled engineers.
    What I seen are larger number of visa holders (like me and my husband - however it wa his job we moved for, and his green card application)

    I find this very interesting. Is it that ingrained to value women's work less?
    There has been changes. My grandmother was a 3 language correspondent (German, French and English and she spoke Danish too), an earned less than her less qualified male co workers. I think the wage differences are more subtle today.

    I also find it personally interesting, as more and more women are doing software engineering, but minor large numbers. I don't see demand drop, though.
     
  13. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    I find that strange because it's just a picture of a beautiful women with some cleavage.

    This is my take on it:

    With the economy the way it is, companies can be picky. So they have gotten so picky they can't find anyone. The other factor is that they want to hire the cheapest labor they can get away with. So they are interviewing young grads, immigrants, persons of color and women mostly.

    It's not that qualifie dpeople aren't out there no matter how much they whine and moan about not being able to get qualified people. The end result is that wages have frozen. I haven't gotten a real raise in years, for example, and now I have to take this contract job because the cool places to work want young grads and not people within 10 years of retirement.

    I think it is ingrained. I remember when my mom was involved with hiring people at a university where they assigned everyone points for their prior work and then hired the person with the most poinst. If you were a fly on the wall in those committees with any kind of social awareness, you'd have been appalled.

    For example, a guy candidate is a part-time HS music teacher for 10 years. He gets 7 points for teaching experience (more than half of the 10 he would have gotten if he'd been a full-time teacher). The woman candidate for the same job has been teaching piano for 25 years out of her home. She gets 0 points beause "that's not real teaching." Then they hire the guy and say "we want to hire women but there just aren't any qualified ones out there." It used make my mom tear her hair out.

    I don't know if they are so blatant today with this sort of practice but I do think that the tendency is still there.
     
  14. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    Part of that might be because the woman worked in her home rather than in a school, or even going to students' home. I work out of my home, and it's amazing the number of otherwise intelligent people who think that I'm sitting around watching soaps all day because it's not a real job, when in fact I do actually work full time. I'm sorry about your mom's experience, but in my case people can think whatever they want - I'm laughing all the way to the bank.
     
  15. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    I see that as a separate issue. If wages drop all around, then everyone makes less, men and women.

    Again, the men in the high-paying jobs are retiring and younger men are not coming along behind them. There are very few men who will have the skills to be CEOs and top execs.

    It seems highly unlikely to me that every profession will become "less" because women enter in greater numbers--unless wages drop across the board. And that's a different issue. But as women continue to move into the top slots, it will be women deciding how much women make.

    That is, obviously, no guarantee that women across the board will make more.

    I guess we will all see how it unfolds.

    Yes? They are measuring the wages earned by women in the US. What is done in other countries is irrelevant, as is what is done if men are the ones to stay home. Women who don't take time off earn more and are, on average, wthin nine percentage points of men. Women who do take off earn less and suffer a higher wage gap. No one is smoothing anything over; if anything, it is pointing out the rather glaring problem of maternity and flex-time policies in US companies.

    Even better. We've come a long way, baby. Bring on the pink aisle!

    My husband is also a software engineer and he makes very good money, and always has. But he's a white male, so I would guess he's not a good example.

    ITA. I got the same thing when I worked at home. And I can easily understand why people wouldn't consider teaching piano lessons at home the same as teaching in a school. For him to teach in a school, he has to be degreed and licensed, and he has been assessed as a teacher for all those years. The woman? Yes, she's been teaching for 25 years. Does she have a degree? Is she licensed? Is she a good teacher? How do you know? Can she teach anything besides piano? Just based on what was posted, we are not talking about an apple and an apple. I'd give him more credit, too, unless there is a lot more to this example.
     
  16. MacMadame

    MacMadame Internet Beyotch

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    I would give him more credit per year but I wouldn't give her ZERO credit. That's just silly. She's been teaching for 25 years and get NO credit for it. If she got even 25% credit, she'd only get 6.25 points but it will still be more than 0.
     
  17. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Came across this article that spoke to many arguments made thus far regarding men and women in the workforce. Some of its key points are despite women outnumbering men in higher education for over a decade or two now, the same employment patterns prevail--women and men are hired at equal rates, but women drop out by 10 years out. Why? Women want more time to have babies/families. It also argues that flextime and generous maternity benefits may give rise to women falling behind at the upper echelons rather than aiding them. Some of the ways women transform certain professions is to make them more family-friendly, but less profitable (and thus, pay less). It concludes that men will likely remain at the top of corporations/academia/start-up companies for the foreseeable future because women prioritize families over career moreso than men.
    http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_4_alpha-female.html

    Interesting food for thought...
     
  18. Angelskates

    Angelskates Well-Known Member

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    Welcome back, agalisgv! :cheer2: Nice to see you posting again! :)
     
  19. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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