Books moral and immoral

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Artemis@BC, Sep 6, 2012.

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  1. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the Hildegard information - she really seems like a fascinating woman, way ahead of her time. I found a few You Tube links of her music - breathtaking. I'll totally be looking for more on her.
     
  2. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    PL, thanks for the rep--the book is awesome IMO. One more thing--with one stroke he skewers a certain type within the French Marxist-leaning intellectual elite. That chapter on Delphine Roux was nothing short of lethal.
     
  3. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    What do you like to read?
     
  4. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    Stick to the classics; that has worked well for me.
     
  5. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday's KDD was the CS Lewis Narnia series. All 7 books, $1.99 each. Bought 3. Still annoyed with them charging me sales tax on virtual deliveries. Last week they didn't. :wall:

    Anyone looking for the Hunger Games trilogy, Amazon has all 3 for $5.00. They're price matching something else out there on the web. :lol:
     
  6. Grannyfan

    Grannyfan Active Member

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    Boy's Life by Robert McCammon. Read it many years ago, and it's one of my favorites. I've recommended it to several friends and family, and no one has been disappointed.
     
  7. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I was an English major. I've read all the classics I intend to read in this lifetime. Now I look for dreck. But it has to be well-written dreck. :)
     
  8. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    Bumping this up before it gets forgotten and buried. :)

    I dowloaded the audios of my favorite comfort read onto my Kindle: Elizabeth Peters' Vicky Bliss series. I have a couple long drives coming up soon and I figure I'll have enough entertainment to keep me from minding the traffic.

    'The Map of Time" was flat. :) I think that people who really liked Connie Willies' "To Say Nothing About the Dog" and Jasper FForde might enjoy it more than I did.

    I'm now finishing up Karen Robard's "Sleepwalker" which has 300+ pages covering about 24 hours with all the murder, mayhem, betrayal and bloodshed that you can imagine thrown into a blender. Mobsters, crooked cops, good-hearted thieves, and a decades old revenge plot are tossed in for good measure. :) It's fun. Not great literature but fun. Which is why I read.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
  9. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    Just finished "Shackleton: Endurance." Wonderfully researched, but it looks like someone replaced ‘the’ with ‘die’ in certain spots. It became distracting. “Shackleton looked at die iceberg”. Did he want the iceberg to die? Or “die penguin waddled”. Maybe he hated penguins? :p

    Real paper books - Now reading Preston & Child's "Reliquary". I'm discovering their Pendergast series and happy with it. At the library, I've got 4 books holding. Unbroken by Laura Hillebrand, Kingmaker's Daughter by Philippa Gregory, The Storyteller by Jodi Picoluet, and something I forget the name of. :lol: I'm on the waiting list for Pope Joan and The Light Between Oceans. Gave up on Wolf Hall, it bothered me.
     
  10. PrincessLeppard

    PrincessLeppard Pink Bitch

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    Just realize that he's MY LITERARY BOYFRIEND. rfisher is gonna come in here and be all "oh, no, he's MINE," but he isn't.
     
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  11. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    You can have him. My literary BF is Gray Pierce from the James Rollins Sigma series. I don't like pale thin men. :lol:
     
  12. Buzz

    Buzz Well-Known Member

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    Here is a list of books from my collection that I hope you would give a try too:

    A Long Way Gone - Ishmael Beah
    Generation Me - Jean Twenge
    Schindler's List - Thomas Keneally
    City of Thieves - David Benioff
    The Necklace and other tales by Guy de Maupassant
    Shake Hands with the Devil - Romeo Dallaire
    Graceland - Chris Abani
    The Winter Queen - Boris Akunin
    The Perfect Game - W. William Winokur
    The Glass Palace - Amitav Ghosh
    Shutter Island - Dennis Lahane
    The Paradox of Choice - Barry Schwartz
    Water - Bapsi Sidhwa
    Travels with my Trombone - Henry Shukman
    Behind Hitler's Lines - Thomas H. Taylor
    The Amber Room - Steve Berry
    Last of the Old Breed - Eugene B. Sledge
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  13. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    I am teaching Intro to Lit :scream: and when I teach Intro to Lit, I require my students to read a novel from a long list I give them. I openly confess to not having read all the books on the list and always read one of the ones I've missed as penance. My penance novel this time is The Way of All Flesh. I am not sure that "scathingly funny" is how I would describe it. It has its moments, but then there's the rest of it.

    When I have had enough of it, I read What is the What and wish I could just read it. I really like the way Dave Eggers writes and the story is gripping.

    When I finish The Way of All Flesh, I will move on to another book from the list (I read a lot faster than my poor students do) and I am trying to decide between One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and The Maltese Falcon. I have The Maltese Falcon, but I've never been able to get past the first chapter :yikes:. Does anyone know if it gets better? I kind of suspect the hardboiled detective who calls his girl a doll while staring at her fantastic legs isn't for me, but maybe I am being shortsighted.

    I also have Square Peg: My Story and What It Means for Raising Innovators, Visionaries, and Out-of-the-Box Thinkers , which I think will be interesting from a teaching perspective.

    I also have a trashy novel for when things get particularly dire (as they are wont to do with Intro to Lit). I can't remember the name, but I think it involves kilts.
     
  14. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I haven't read any of Hammett's stuff yet, but I'm working my way through Chandler in between more serious books. Generally, I veer between a couple opinions depending upon what is going on in the chapter: woah that description was actually pretty awesome (which may or may not happen with Hammett, as I don't know his writing style yet), huh that was actually a pretty good twist, oh that was actually a pretty bad twist, and a mixture of cringe/LMAO/did people actually think like this then? at all the ridiculously over-the-top, hardboiled, homophobic, racist, misogynistic stuff, depending upon how ridiculous or mean I think it is from my 21st century white female perspective.

    So, the detective who calls his girl a doll while staring at her fantastic legs would probably just make me gigglecringe, but if you can't come at it from that angle probably it's not something you'd want to read (unless you're the sort of person who thinks that sort of thing is charming or cool).
     
  15. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Gigglecringe is about it, but it all just seems so......contrived, maybe? Like you said, did people REALLY think (and talk) like this?
     
  16. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Well, hardboiled novels kind of are my trash reading these days. I just can't do romance novels and other standard trash. I'd rather read the contrived hardboiled stuff than the contrived trashy romance stuff any day.

    I definitely don't think anyone talked like that. :lol:
     
  17. dbell1

    dbell1 Well-Known Member

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    I read "The Storyteller" by Jodi Picoulet last night. Started at 6:00 and stayed up until 1:30 to finish it. I laughed, I cried, I rolled my eyes at some amazing coincidences. Had no idea it was about a baker and a Nazi war criminal when I ordered it from the library. This is one book that will stay with me for a long time. And I'll be buying the hardcover. It's the kind of book that I'll reread. Just fabulous in parts.

    I think I need some light reading today.
     
  18. A.H.Black

    A.H.Black Well-Known Member

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    I am currently reading "The Lady in the Lake" by Chandler. Mysteries are my staple for relaxing reading. I'm liking Chandler. His detail of description - especially character description - is excellent. I'm also working my way through several Tony Hillerman mysteries.

    Also, I just finished "Bambi". I found an old, hashed copy. It was missing the last page, but I didn't miss it. I'm confident I know how it ended. I am also still slogging through "Vanity Fair". I respect it as a classic but I can't say I'm loving the read. I don't think I like any of the characters at all. I know I'm not supposed to, but I like my characters to be likeable.
     
  19. Marge_Simpson

    Marge_Simpson Well-Known Member

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    Mine is Severus Snape. :lol:
     
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  20. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Yours and a huge number of fangirls all over the internet :lol: Who would have thought the dour, sarcastic, mean, conflicted, unattractively described man would be so popular with the ladies? ;)
     
  21. Marge_Simpson

    Marge_Simpson Well-Known Member

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    He's not dour, he is just misunderstood. :p

    I have a Snape action figure (with removable cape) that I bought when the first film came out. I found it in a sale bin for $2.99. It has been perched next to my computer ever since. :HA!:
     
  22. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Oh, don't worry, I'm with you. I've been reading HG/SS fanfiction since I was 11 :p

    The four books in the Hangman's Daughter series are all $0.99 today for Kindle. I don't know much about them but I've heard some buzz.
     
  23. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    It's that "I could change him, he just needs love" thing I think.

    That, plus Alan Rickman. :D
     
  24. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Plus his voice specifically, I think :lol: Though I may be wrong about that.
     
  25. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I hunkered down with YA SF over the weekend: Cassandra Clare's "City of Ashes." I liked it, although the angsty brother/sister duo is getting a bit tiring. I give the author credit for worldbuilding, though. My omly quibble is that I kept wondering how these teenagers are able to get away with virtually no adult supervision and with never going to school. But I'll pick up the third one, the next time I'm in Walmart.

    I then moved on to M.J. Rose's "The Book of Lost Fragrances" - a paranormal/reincarnation tale centering around the perfume industry and a quest for a mysterious Egyptian formula for the perfect scent.
     
  26. LilJen

    LilJen Well-Known Member

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    That's Jodi Picoult in a nutshell. Laugh, cry, amazing coincidences, tough moral issues bathed in amazing coincidences, lawyers. :)
     
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  27. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    Oh, come now. Sydney Carton was winning over the ladies before Snape was born or thought of. ;) (I know quite a few women who are in love with both of them!)
     
  28. rfisher

    rfisher Satisfied skating fan

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    Damn straight I am. I even read the blog page.
     
  29. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Every woman adores a Fascist,
    The boot in the face, the brute
    Brute heart of a brute like you.
     
  30. Wyliefan

    Wyliefan Well-Known Member

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    Sylvia Plath was ahead of her time. :D
     
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