Books moral and immoral

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Artemis@BC, Sep 6, 2012.

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  1. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I

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    Duberman's book and the two Robbins books are the three relatively recent major works of dance-related biography. They were there for her to use. I don't doubt that O'Connor did research her book; whether she used them as sources or skipped them, that she went with her own narrative, reportedly autobiographical, is one of the reasons I'm not tempted by her book.

    Balanchine had many muses with whom he did not have relationships.
     
  2. aftershocks

    aftershocks Well-Known Member

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    I also previously linked O'Connor's defense of her fictionalized approach. I find O'Connor's comments compelling in regard to why she was intrigued by Tanaquil Le Clercq's life, and why she decided not to write a biography. I don't think O'Connor's fictionalized account of Tanaquil Le Clercq's relationship with Balanchine is autobiographical, just that some of the things Le Clercq experienced resonated with O'Connor and captured her imagination.

    Definitely Balanchine had many muses, among them Darci Kistler, and Merrill Ashley (who wrote the wonderful book, Dancing for Balanchine). I think it's safe to say that Balanchine had devotional, mutual love for ballet "relationships" with all of the female dancers who captured his attention, and he ended up marrying quite a few who were his major muses, except for Farrell and except for those who became his major muses during his later years. A few of Balanchine's dancers, both male and female, shared a close friendship with him.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  3. snoopy

    snoopy Team St. Petersburg

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    I got through half of Nevada Barr's 13 1/2 and just realized it isn't a Anna Pigeon book. /shuffle.

    I haven't decided if I will finish. I kinda want to find out what happens and I think the plot is interesting but the writing kind of plods along heavily.
     
  4. emason

    emason Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to rfisher for recommending Midnight Riot; I'm reading it now and really enjoying it.
     
  5. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    Joyce Carol Oates is releasing a historical fiction novel next March called The Accursed. Looks nice and creepy. :)

     
  6. Matryeshka

    Matryeshka Well-Known Member

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    Joyce Carol Oats is one of those writers where I feel I should get something out of her books, and I just don't. Her books are very workman-like to me. Pathos goes here. Three dimensional characters go here. Oppressive scenery/town there. She's COP for literature IMO, right down to the backloading at the end in her writing style.
     
  7. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    I agree. I can't think of a book of hers that I've actually enjoyed, but then I stopped reading them a long time ago.

    I'm finished with vampires for a bit now and moving back to a couple of cozy mysteries I 've had sitting around. I need a little less blood and mayhem in my life this week. :)
     
  8. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I

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    I rarely listen to NPR anymore, and I didn't know until today about the controversy about their reader-suggested "best Young Adult fiction" list, in which all but three books have white protagonists:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/09/10/whos_to_blame_for_nprs_super_white_book_list/?source=newsletter

    Hilary Mantel's historical fiction about Anne Boleyn, "Bring Up the Bodies" made the short list for the Booker Prize, and is currently 2/1 odds to be a repeat winner.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/09/11/booker-shortlist.html

    The other five short-listed books are:
    "The Garden of Evening Mists", Tan Twan Eng (Malaysia)
    "Narcopolis", Jeet Thayil (India)
    "Self's Umbrella", Will Self (GB)
    "Swimming Home", Deborah Levy (GB)
    "The Lighthouse", Alison Moore (GB)
     
  9. aftershocks

    aftershocks Well-Known Member

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    ^^ Ahhh, Joyce Carol Oates, the prolific, all-consuming literary meister! I'm more familiar with her earlier books, many of which I was introduced to in college. There is something about the contradiction between JCO's meek-seeming persona and her violent angst-ridden subject matter that I find compelling.

    I enjoyed reading the biography of JCO: Invisible Writer, by Greg Johnson. I got a lot out of JCO's Them, Bellefleur, Do With Me What You Will, and her short story, Where are you going? Where have you been? (made into the movie Smooth Talk with Laura Dern and Treat Williams).

    Might JCO and Toni Morrison be somewhat comparable in their imaginative intensity and singular desire to write for themselves. Neither likely care a hoot what others think ... Altho' JCO's prose is often wordy and dense, and Morrison's prose can be rich and dense, they are both masters of the writing art.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  10. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    I haven't read the Salon article yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if most NPR listeners are white so it makes sense to me that their favorite books would have white main characters. When I read young adult fiction, it's usually because it's familiar and almost comforting. If I want to 'expand my horizons', I generally read adult fiction. Of course, I may be missing the point of NPR's list so I'll go read the article.

    Re: the Booker Prize shortlist. I'm glad The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry didn't make it. I only made it through the first few pages. Yuck...

    I've only read a short story of hers and liked it pretty well so hopefully I'll enjoy the book despite its likely flaws. :D
     
  11. Artemis@BC

    Artemis@BC Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of book prize lists ... the longlist for the Giller Prize is up. Generally speaking I find the Giller winners and nominees more, um, readable than any of the other big literary prizes.

    I'm already in the library queue for Y, will have to check out some of the other titles. I've read several of these authors, but not the nominated books/
     
  12. Kasey

    Kasey Loving on babies!

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    I have been going through re-reading Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries (always re-readable). But just downloaded biographies of Nelson Mandela and Julia Child onto the kindle that may get started tonight at work (if it's a slow work night)
     
  13. Matryeshka

    Matryeshka Well-Known Member

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    I too am one with vampire books for a while as I just read Discovery of Witches. Yes, I know I'm a year late to that bandwagon. :yikes: :scream: :confused: As deliciously dreadful as Twilight is, it is high literature compared to its spinoffs. Bella is practically a card-carrying feminazi by comparison.

    So, I decided to go with apocalyptic and am reading The Windup Girl. I think it would be great if I knew what the freaking hell was going on in the book. I figure after 150 pages in, you should have some basic idea about the layout of the book's universe, right?
     
  14. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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  15. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    The link didn't work, but this should.

    And I would definitely recommend an e-reader. Much nicer than reading on your phone, and they're becoming so inexpensive!
     
  16. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    Thanks for the correct link. I'm posting from my phone and I always have problems posting links.

    I actually have a Nook but I'm considering getting a Kindle Paperwhite when it comes out. I think the Nook and the Kindle both have things they do better than the other so they'll complement each other nicely. The Kindle usually has better daily deals while the Nook has more library books available.
     
  17. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    I considered the Nook - until I found out they don't sell them internationally. I did like that it was an EPub reader. I think you're right about them complimenting each other, especially now that the Agency model is being phased out and we'll likely start seeing more deals.

    I'll stick with my Kindle Keyboard as long as it's working :)
     
  18. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    The Nook edition of A Winter's Tale is $1.99 today. I apologize is advance if the link doesn't work. :shuffle:

    Zem, glad the Kindle is working well for you. Have you seen the specs for the new Paperwhite? It looks really nice. I posted the link upthread (on my laptop so it should work. :))
     
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  19. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    It does look nice! But I can't justify buying a new device - have only had my Keyboard for a little over a year, and it works fine. I'm sure eventually it'll die, and then I'll upgrade to whatever looks best... I guess I'm no company's dream consumer :D

    Paperwhite is not a great name.
     
  20. galaxygirl

    galaxygirl Ma name's Beckeh

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    It makes me think of White Out.
     
  21. star_gazer11

    star_gazer11 practising choreo

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    I'm loving the idea of the new lighted eink screens. Kobo has also announced theirs and I'll have to check it out in stores when it's released. But I do not need a new ereader, sigh.
     
  22. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    So on the ridiculously long travel over to China I read all of Gillian Flynn's first book, Sharp Objects, and I think, in the end, I actually liked it better than Gone Girl. You can see that her writing's evolved somewhat between the two, but the ending of SO was better and the mystery came together in a much more believable fashion. I bought Dark Places too, so I'll get to that eventually. Right now I'm reading The Flander's Panel by Arturo Pérez-Reverte. Really liking it so far.
     
  23. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    Hmmm. I read Sharp Objects and thought it was interesting, but it did not make me particularly want to read Gone Girl. I've been debating whether to give it a try.
     
  24. Buzz

    Buzz Well-Known Member

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    Ever heard of a novel called Marathon Man? Someone gave me a copy but I was wondering how good is it?!
     
  25. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    By William Goldman? Sure.

    Never read it; seen the movie.

    "Is it safe?" :scream:
     
  26. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    i loved it when i read it but it was many years ago
     
  27. Buzz

    Buzz Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. I am looking forward to it now. :)
     
  28. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I am reading The 50 Greatest Mysteries of All Time compiled by Otto Penzler and picked up at a discount. I am the kind who reads introductions and this one was well worth reading: wonderfully snarky and unpretentious. I was surprised he didn't include anything by Christie and found out why. Her and a few other mystery writers' agents turned out to ask a much higher price than the anthology could afford. He actually names them all, all the greedy ones!

    The first one is Poe's Purloined Letter. Who could fault this choice? But along with the big names like Poe and Conan Doyle, there are many unknown to me so I look forward to discovering them.

    My Simenon arrives next week from amazon France. They take a loooooong time to ship, much slower than the British amazon.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2012
  29. Nan

    Nan Just me

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    I read the book and saw the movie. Enjoyed them both.
     
  30. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member

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    That's been my experience with Amazon.fr as well. I try, whenever possible, to get foreign-language books from a US source. I often use Adler's in Evanston, IL.
     
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