Aurora Colorado mass murderer offers a 'guilty' plea in exchange for his life

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Vash01, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. Vash01

    Vash01 Fan of Julia, Elena, Anna, Liza, and Sasha

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    What a sicko! After killing a dozen people he wants to live! The prosecutor denied his request, so now his attorney is going to try for an insanity defense. If this guy gets off the hook, I am going to be very upset. Normally I don't approve of capital punishment, but recent cases of mass killings are making me wonder if there should exceptions when someone kills masses of innocent people for no reason at all?

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/01/justice/colorado-theater-shooting-prosecution/index.html?hpt=hp_t5
     
  2. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not surprised at all, actually. It's what any competent defense lawyer would do.

    The death penalty will not stop other sickos from doing what he did. Because they are sick. The rest of that thought probably belongs in the politics thread...
     
  3. CantALoop

    CantALoop Well-Known Member

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    Little chickensh*t twat.

    Whatever punishment they give him, I hope it's not what he asks for.
     
  4. PrincessLeppard

    PrincessLeppard Pink Bitch

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    The death penalty is not a deterrent. The study I'm thinking of said that murders drop a bit in the two weeks after an execution, but then go back to normal (?) numbers.

    I don't support the death penalty.
     
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  5. cruisin

    cruisin Well-Known Member

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    I would rather he not get the death penalty. I hope he rots in jail for the rest of his life. Hopefully solitary, with nothing to do but stare at the walls.

    I think a deterrent would be to never say the name of these monsters. Don't even give them a nickname. Just refer to them as the next coward who murdered innocent people. Don't delve into their psychological issues, their relationships with their family, friends, etc. Give them no "glory" to feed of of.
     
  6. RFOS

    RFOS Well-Known Member

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    But isn't it important to at least try to understand the types of psychological issues that lead to these terrible crimes? I also find it really fascinating. I can understand though that one of the "issues" that the perpetrators might have is a desire for "glory" in a sick sense, so I'm not really sure the best way to handle it. I, too, am against the death penalty and not really in favor of "punitive" justifications for incarceration as I alluded to in the Steubenville thread, but obviously he needs to be kept out of the general public. I don't think he should be treated cruelly though, and having nothing to do but stare at the walls seems pretty cruel! I've been almost as bored as that at work with an extremely tedious project that needs to be done and it's awful and mind-numbing. I wouldn't wish even more severe boredom on anyone.
     
  7. Oreo

    Oreo Active Member

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    I'd put him down. Why should the tax payers pay for his accommodations, three square meals, entertainment, and medical for the next 60+ years?
     
  8. Vash01

    Vash01 Fan of Julia, Elena, Anna, Liza, and Sasha

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    I have mixed feelings about it. Heaven forbid, if my family member or a friend was killed in this heinous matter, I would want to see him dead. However, that would be revenge, which is also a bad thing.
     
  9. ballettmaus

    ballettmaus Well-Known Member

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    I wonder how some people can be religious (which many Americans seem to be, at least that's my impression) in which case they would consider death not a punishment and then demand the death penalty thus granting the criminal something that might even be considered a salvation. To me it seems to be more a punishment to keep someone in prison for the rest of their life; no freedom, no privacy, no comfort. Just rot, as PrincessLeppard put it.
     
  10. cruisin

    cruisin Well-Known Member

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    As far as understanding the psychological issues. I have no problem with him becoming a research subject. But, privately. Not in the public eye. I don't advocate the death penalty or physical punishment. However, putting him in a room - alone - for the rest of his life would not bother me. He took away the lives of a dozen people. People who had futures, families, friends. Their lives are over because of this psycho. He doesn't deserve another moment of pleasure.
     
  11. Prancer

    Prancer The "specialness" that is Staff Member

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    There is an old study that shows that capital murders go UP for two weeks following an execution, then down to normal again, I think. Most of the very few studies that have been done indicate that capital punishment is not a deterrent, although there is a recent one that says otherwise, and there are many anecdotal accounts of criminals who say they pulled back on some crimes because they didn't want to risk CP.

    But really, I don't think many people are interested in the deterrent value of capital punishment, any more than they are interested in the rehabilitation value of prisons. They seek punishment. Anything else is a nice benefit, but rather beside the point.
     
  12. duane

    duane New Member

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    I too rather he not get the death penalty. But I don't want him in solitary confinement. I want him to be passed around as the prison _itch.
     
  13. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. It's a selfish want, although an understandable one. If my sister was killed in such a manner, I would be angry, but I wouldn't push for the death penalty. She doesn't believe in it, has been extremely vocal about it, and to push for it would be going against pretty much everything she believes in. It would be soiling her memory, which is all she would have left.

    I'd still like to knee this hypothetical perpetrator in the throat though. Just because.

    Unfortunately, I think this is the case in the US.

    Killing this sicko won't bring any of the victims back. His death row appeals will cost the taxpayers much more than just straight-up jailing him for life. If he's determined to be mentally ill, he's definitely shown to be a danger to society so he should be locked away, but killing him won't change anything that's already happened.
     
  14. vesperholly

    vesperholly Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure mass murderers would go to hell after being put to death by the state. And it isn't terribly inconsistent to be religious and for the death penalty ... there is that little bit in the Bible about an eye for an eye. No more from me on that subject, as I am irreligious.

    Me personally, I'd like to see criminals like that labor away at boring, necessary crap like license plates or road signs for the rest of his life for 3 cents an hour.
     
  15. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, there's also that little bit that goes, "thou shalt not kill." And I don't see much of a difference between actual killing yourself and calling out that a person needs to be killed.