`Am not too fond of the USA' - Vaitsekhovskaya's interview with Leonova

Discussion in 'Great Skate Debate' started by TAHbKA, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Hey- I said "that might change".

    I can say for sure I am not eating it. I rarely eat any meat at all, and when I do- I know the person who raised it, and they can tell me the animal's name :)
     
  2. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    I'm beginning to wonder how many people have actually been to America, and if they have, where and how much of an effort they put into finding "quality" food because a lot of what I'm reading is based on generalities, stereotypes, and heresy.

    Like many other countries, the U.S. is a diverse place and different areas will offer up different kinds of foods. Also, different restaurants will offer up different kinds of food. A restaurant serving higher quality ingredients can exist in U.S. and it doesn't have to be a high-priced place either.

    Or we can just be lazy and assume every where in America is the same serving up highly-processed crap dipped in lots of oil and fat ready to be served in giant portions to the fattest people in the world.

    Yes, I know there are huge debates regarding the types of steroids put into our meats or the types of diet cattle/pigs/chickens are fed and even what the heck organic means. However, I bet most people are thinking about how the food is actually prepped and cooked because I bet most people wouldn't be able to tell the difference in terms of taste if they got two steaks with one from a typical American butchery and one from a European place if both were of similar kind and prepared the same way.

    Anyway, I'm sure if people really do think the quality of food in America is subpar to every other country in the world, they can go to Portland and be happy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2LBICPEK6w
     
  3. my little pony

    my little pony snarking for AZE

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    garfield isnt really the best you can do for him if he wants sidewalks is it? at least drive him into weehawken
     
  4. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    Is McDonalds a default, though, i.e., what you bring home when you can't cook and pizza is out of the way?

    I remember the McDonalds in Munich being packed in 1977, but, at least at lunchtime, mostly by businessmen, because only they could afford 3,75DM for a Big Mac (when they were barely over $1 in the US, and people were :drama: and :mad: because one was opening just off the Ringstrasse in Vienna.

    That's great, but what if you go to the local market and buy your own sandwich fixings: the salami and chicken/turkey breast is processed and generally has a lot of salt. It's not that easy to avoid empty calories without a lot of effort, let alone in another language when you're in a place intermittently.

    It's not a matter of not being able to find it, but there's a cultural difference between being settled in a place with routines, where you know that pretty much whatever store you go into is selling you something relatively healthy, and having to go out of your way to eat healthy, like being able to get to and meet up with the farmer to get his/her meat or head to the local farmers' market when they're open. That's where it's probably easier for Leonova to get to NYC than to the three or four places she'd need to go to get those ingredients.

    (I'm just bummed that the farmers I buy from changed their bi-monthly delivery date, and I was away. I may have just missed the last chance to get lamb for the season :wuzrobbed)

    No, our meat/chicken has been found to have, literally, crap in it, as well as fecal bacteria, pink slime and ammonia, not to mention antibiotics.

    I think Ziggy's point, if I understand it correctly, is that not having sidewalks on which people can walk is an indication of a car culture.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  5. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    This is for you, Zemgirl, and anyone else who really want to know:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2882581/

    I guess that means it's icky, not unhealthy, except for the phenylbutazone that has been found in much of the meat that has been found to be improperly marketed as beef recently in Europe. :yikes: :scream:
     
  6. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    Oh no no, no Weehawken, he's getting booted out of my rude Amerikan car in Garfield if he wants to come over here for some fancy sidewalks. I think he'd find Garfield to be rather.....familiar.

    :sheep:
     
  7. babayaga

    babayaga Active Member

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    But that's exactly the problem - how much effort someone like Leonova can put into finding good food. I've lived in the US for 12 years now and by now I know how to eat well, but during my first year, when I didn't speak much English and didn't have a car, I ate what was easy to find and that was mostly not good. It took me some time to understand how things are organized here, ask around for an advice of local people, get a car. None of that is possible for Leonova while she is here for just a month. If I were her, I guarantee I would have no idea where all the good food is supposed to be.

    And while both good and bad food is available in both the US and Europe, I still find that you have to put a lot more effort and do a lot more research to eat well in the US than in Europe.
     
  8. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    not any more than it is here. Quite a few young people in there too.

    Who is making you buy lunch meat? That's not what I mean by lean protein. It IS easy to avoid deli meat--didn't see anyone being held to a gun point.
     
  9. allezfred

    allezfred Old and Immature Admin Staff Member

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    Heresy? Are hamburgers a religion in the US? :eek: ;)

    Speaking of horse meat, it's kind of a taboo here for similar reasons as the UK. There's a stall at a farmer's market in the city centre that sells horse meat steak baguettes.
     
  10. Wiery

    Wiery Well-Known Member

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    I"m not going to address quality of US food, as that can vary between regions, and no doubt is more difficult to obtain if there is a language barrier and that person is not familiar with the area. I do feel for anyone who moves across the world for their job or to train for their sport, and I admire Leonova's drive and determination. I don't blame her at all for missing her home, friends, family, and for not being totally in love with the US.
     
  11. OliviaPug

    OliviaPug Well-Known Member

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    Me too, and I can walk to 4 of them, 2 of them being organic markets. I guess that makes me lucky!

    O-
     
  12. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    In my case, it's based on experience living in cities on both coasts of the US and Vancouver, BC.

    The issue is that too many restaurant supplies that aren't fresh fruit and vegetables, particularly condiments, cheeses, sauces and soups that aren't made from scratch, are from the same sources that stock supermarket shelves. That isn't even considering the meat. Since the margin for food in restaurants is relatively slim, the cheaper the better.

    I went to Four Continents in Colorado Springs last year, and there were a handful of restaurants within walking distance of the hotel and arena. I would say that described every one of them. I'll eat the occasional deep-friend pickle like most people, but it was hard to spend a week there and eat reasonably.

    Considering that most people's butchery is a supermarket or grocery store, not a traditional butcher, the difference is quite remarkable. I didn't know what chicken tasted like until I had a chicken sandwich from an average corner sandwich shop in Le Marais. The trois fromages sandwich was like night and day for what passes for cheese at a typical sandwich shop in NYC, Seattle, Vancouver, Boston, Philadelphia, or even Portland.

    I don't remember anyone saying every other country in the world.

    Portland has sidewalks and great public transportation, though :p
     
  13. VIETgrlTerifa

    VIETgrlTerifa Well-Known Member

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    :lol:

    I meant "hearsay." Although, now that you bring it up, I had my first Bison burger when I was in New Haven, CT last weekend, and it was so good that I could have worshipped it.
     
  14. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Member

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    boy o boy do I agree with this statement! I personally hate pc... for instance all those carefully calculated enthusiastic
    comments, designed to flatter the interviewer and not to irritate any possible viewers for ex. "we're so lucky to have had this incredible possibility and hope that it enriches our training experience" insufferably cloying comments that I have heard from the likes of Charlie & Meryl for instance a million times. (as much as I love 'em!) and as far as Leonova goes, let's face it guys, US food is normally really BAD even if one can afford to go to a restaurant, much less in a community dining setting such as athletes use. Not that Russian food, in my experience, is any better, it's just......different, but I live in Italy, land of food obsessed people.
     
  15. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    The fattest people in the world live in Nauru.

    We must be due for another round on the subject. It's been at least three months since the last one.

    I'm sorry you had to work at finding what you consider good food just to find that these places were in your backyard all along.

    I guess I'm lucky that I didn't have to do that.
     
  16. OliviaPug

    OliviaPug Well-Known Member

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    I didn't have to work at finding these places. My posts were referring to Leonova's situation, not my own. I personally find fresh food very easy to find, and only wish her circumstances were different or she had more discretionary time to explore her options.

    O-
     
  17. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Member

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    I live in a tiny little town in NE Italy and there are buses every 30 min to the nearest big city. so it's not necessarily true throughout Europe.
     
  18. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    I've spent quite a bit of time in Southern Italy. It was so lovely. But did you know that ouside of big cities all they have is Italian food? Horrors! One can only eat so much pasta and pizza in 4 weeks. After a while we were craving sushi, burritos, pho and Thai food. Why? Because I live in one of the most diverse places in the world in terms of cuisine. I can't think of a major world cuisine that can't be found where I live.

    But did it occur to me to bitch about Italy, or goodness forbid about authentic Italian food I was forced to eat for several weeks straight?
     
  19. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    Why travel when you can pontificate in the safety and comfort of your own home?

    :wideeyes:

    Unless I have missed something, Leonova hasn't said anything publicly about the food she gets in the U.S. (The Olympics were in Canada.)

    I would expect that, as in Novogorsk, she doesn't really have to put any effort into marketing or cooking. Unless Morozov's entire team goes out to restaurants three times a day, this is probably handled for her by her coach, who has spent several years living in the U.S. and speaks fairly good English, or by one of his assistants.
     
  20. babayaga

    babayaga Active Member

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    I thought the whole big deal is because she said in the interview translated in the beginning of the thread that she is uncomfortable with the american food among other things.
     
  21. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Member

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    This is the most laughable thing I have read in ages.
     
  22. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    So do I, even though I live in a suburb of fewer than 50,000 people, I don't have sidewalks in my plat, and I drive a car.

    I can't speak for Leonova, however, as I have no idea if she looks, where she looks, or what she is looking for--or even if her issue is finding "fresh" food (what, they don't have apples and such in New Jersey?) or whether she just prefers the Russian food she eats at home. I had kind of thought it was the latter, but what do I know? Maybe she's just fine with, say, eggs, as long as the hens are free range and vegetarian fed, and the fact that they are cooked in a way she isn't used to is irrelevant, and she wouldn't mind a hamburger at all if it was made from grass-fed beef.
     
  23. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    If she wants a gold medal winning hamburger then White Manna is her answer.
     
  24. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Member

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    There's nothing inheritantly unhealthy about horse meat. You may object to the idea but it's just as normal as beef to many Europeans. The debate is about the fact that the lable did not inform the consumer that the food contained horse. that's the question, there are no health aspects in this. Sorry, actually there are if the horsemeat comes from a slaughtered race horse, These animals may not be used for food since they may have been given medicine which leaves traces in the meat.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  25. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Who does have the world's greatest abundance of wonderful, fresh foods?
     
  26. mathgirl

    mathgirl New Member

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    Food choices, at least in Canada, really depend on your location. When I went to Canadians in Mississauga, food options were limited. The arena had mostly unhealthy and high-priced food and there was nothing available within walking distance. My friend and I had a car, but because of the crazy competition schedule, we didn't have time to drive out, and instead, we brought a hamper of food from home and ate in the cold parking lot. I could see why visitors, whether fans or competitors, would think the food in Canada was terrible if they didn't have a car to get around.

    On the other hand, if you check out the Restaurant thread for this year's Worlds in London, you'll see lots of suggestions, the main one being the Covent Garden Market, just steps from the arena. There, you can find a large variety of prepared healthy dishes (as well as unhealthy ones), along with fresh fruits and vegetables, local cheeses, organic meats, etc. When I went to Canadians a few years ago, I ate there the entire time.

    It is true that fast-food is popular among many Canadians, but it sounds like Leonova had an unfortunate experience in Vancouver. Actually, I had absolutely fantastic seafood and Asian food when I visited Vancouver many years ago, and some of it was quite inexpensive.
     
  27. Oreo

    Oreo Active Member

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    Enough speculation! You know, I think we should compile a list of questions to ask Leonova directly and get to the bottom of this. It can't be that hard to e-mail her through her blog. We can ask her if she was forced to eat rink food while in America; how often--if at all--was she allowed access to fresh food; is her English good enough to read food labels; did she have to walk long distances on roads without sidewalks to obtain food she could eat--that sort of thing.
     
    hanca and (deleted member) like this.
  28. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Again, Leonova was talking about the food in the athletes' cafeteria, not Vancouver in general.


    :lol:

    I thought what she said was perfectly clear--she's homesick and likes the food better at home. Why this would be controverisal in any way or have anything to do with finding organic food within walking distance in places that have sidewalks, I don't know. But I miss a lot.
     
  29. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Member

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  30. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    Hmmm. Well, I think the traditional Meditteranean diet is certainly healthy, but.....

    While the rest of the world is encouraged to copy the traditional Italian menu by swapping junk food for fruit and vegetables, it seems Italians are forgetting the lessons they taught everyone else.

    Dr Antonello del Vecchio, a practising doctor and spokesman for Slow Food, the international movement born 20 years ago, said: "Italians are eating less and less of the Italian diet and more and more fast food," he said. "For a long while, unlike northern Europe, we resisted, but now it's here and we're seeing the results."

    More than a third &#8211; 36 per cent &#8211; of Italian children are either overweight or obese by the age of eight, according to a survey released this week by the Institute for Auxology of Milan, making Italy the worst in Europe in terms of obesity among young children.


    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...s-as-italy-forgets-eating-habits-2347203.html

    Maybe the effort is only huge, consistent, and unrelenting locally?