`Am not too fond of the USA' - Vaitsekhovskaya's interview with Leonova

Discussion in 'Great Skate Debate' started by TAHbKA, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Do skaters actually eat AT rinks? I've only been to one that had any sort of decent food, and even that was just nice hamburgers. Most do popcorn, nachos, pretzels, maybe a hot dog. They aren't designed to feed meals, but snacks.

    If she was eating her meals at a rink, of course she would think it was terrible. No one could find a healthy meal to sustain a training diet out of that!
     
  2. Marco

    Marco Missing Ziggy

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    Well soon enough she will not be able to make it out of Nationals anyways :p
     
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  3. berthesghost

    berthesghost Well-Known Member

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    But isn't that the goal? Work hard, overcome all obstacles, compete in the Olys in russia, and spend free time writing whiny blogs where she sweats the petty stupid shyte that doesn't matter.
     
  4. MacMadame

    MacMadame Cat Lady-in-Training

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    Some rinks have "restaurants" where they serve bar food. It's a step up from the hamburgers and hot dogs and fries at the grill or grabbing something from a machine.

    IME skaters eat a combo of rink food and stuff they bring from home.
     
  5. Karina1974

    Karina1974 Well-Known Member

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    Some of us do have cars and still use public transport. I use it to get to work, because I live just 6 blocks off the bus line "going out" and 4 blocks "coming back" and the bus stops in front of the building next to where I work. Costs $1.50/ride, no matter how long it takes to get from Point A to Point B, or if there is a traffic delay or detour (I would be wasting gas and therefore $$ if I got caught up in those same delays in my car). It also means I am driving my car 30 miles less every single week (6 mile RT commute/day), which saves on wear and tear (and repairs!), and leaves me with more gas in the tank for driving to the places I go (like out of state) where public transport either doesn't go, or where I'd be making a return trip "after hours." Gas is touching $4.00/gallon in my area right now, so spending $55/month on a bus pass that gives me unlimited rides on weekdays and saving the car for non-work purposes makes perfect sense.
     
  6. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    All this talk of rink food got me wondering about what Leonova was accustomed to back in Novogorsk.

    According to this webpage, there is a canteen that offers "four time nourishment considering recommendations of doctors and coaches of National Teams and peculiarities of National cuisines of different countries." ;)

    This comes along with free coaching, free housing, and free transportation to international competitions, all of which Leonova also gets when she trains in the U.S. I suspect that she also gets a stipend to help her afford her shopping. I hope she enjoys it while she can.
     
  7. shine

    shine Well-Known Member

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    A Russian, from Novogorsk no less, complaining about the food in Vancouver. That would be the biggest joke I've ever seen :rofl:
     
  8. dawnie

    dawnie Active Member

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    Yes, I know Irina said it but I thought she used Sarah Hughes (post SLC) as a point of reference when she was talking about fat Americans and their cheeseburgers? Did I just make this up in my own mind?
     
  9. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    Is there a difference between Leonova expressing her dislike for Canadian/American food and other people expressing their dislike of Russian food? Other than her saying it to a journalist, of course.
     
  10. shine

    shine Well-Known Member

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    What exactly IS Canadian/American food though?
     
  11. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    In general, food made with heavily processed ingredients, lots of omega-6 laden oils, twice as many chemical sounding ingredients as food product, grain-fed meats, and containing corn-syrup and soy-based fillers. Also excess sodium, not to mention tasteless, an actual goal of McDonalds hamburgers. And crappy bread. Almost all of which are the result of highly industrialized food industry.

    In short, tasteless empty colories of questionable nutritional value. It's on the labels.

    I'm not sure how this has changed in the last 20 years or so, but having grandmothers who could cook were part of Russian culture nI've heard a lot about.

    Leonova didn't complain about Vancouver food: she complained about the Olympic cafeteria food provided through VANOC.
     
  12. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Well there is your problem right there. If you eat pre-processed stuff of course it is questionable. 80% of the food I eat doesn't have labels, thankfully my husband cooks a lot from scratch- we don't buy any bread products for example, and we buy our meat straight from a farmer.

    If Russian grandmothers are known to cook, why would she think she can get similar quality food if she (or someone else) isn't doing the cooking? Convienence foods shouldn't be the majority of anyone's diet.


    ETA: Because this was misunderstood- I don't think Lenova would be able to duplicate this. However, this is to the response of "What is American food?". I don't think it is typically overprocessed crap. I think most people treat that as an occasional food.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  13. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    Ok, so now we've learned that the US is lacking in (1) fresh food, (2) paved roads and (3) grandmothers that can cook. :wuzrobbed
     
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  14. OliviaPug

    OliviaPug Well-Known Member

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    deleted double post
     
  15. OliviaPug

    OliviaPug Well-Known Member

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    There is no greater abundance of wonderful, fresh foods than in the U.S.A. You just have to seek it out and have the $ to pay for it. I haven't eaten McDonalds in 30 years. Processed food is fast and easy, yes, but it's also a choice to eat it or not. I can see where Leonova may not have the wherewithal to get fresh foods and that would be a source of frustration, but that doesn't mean they're not available.

    O-
     
  16. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if the US has the greatest abundance of good food; there are many places were fresh, good food is easily available and inexpensive. OTOH, it can certainly difficult to access quality produce in many places in the US - in some cases, even if you are willing to pay top dollar. This was my own experience, and though that's somewhat dated by now, I've heard the same from friends who've been to the US more recently.
     
  17. hanca

    hanca Well-Known Member

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    Your husband may cook everything from scratch, but I doubt that Leonova has the opportunity to do the same when staying in the USA. Would she have cooking facilities? Would she be able to go to market to get proper food, or would she have to rely on what's available in the nearest one shop because she doesn't have a car to go somewhere further? Does she have a time to go chasing after healthy food, or is her life only revolving around waking up, going to rink, come back from rink, go to bed?

    Maybe Leonova is lacking a husband, who would travel with them and cook for her healthy food? (like your husband).
     
  18. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Of course that is what her life is. That is what every skater's life is. But most of the Americans still manage to feed themselves somehow. I doubt they eat much more than chicken breast and a few vegetables during the season anyway.

    I'm just saying that if all she was doing was eating convience (sorry, I cannot spell this word) foods, -of course- she would be unhappy with American food. I'm not saying her complaint is unfounded, merely easy to explain. Anyone without a support system in place, whether they would be able to support themselves or need a parent or friend to help, would be unhappy.

    The response about my diet was in reference to what American food is, which was a tangent to the conversation about Leonova. American food does not have to be unhealthy, overprocessed junk. I know very few people who eat that way once they are out of college.

    (For the record- I live in a suburban area and until recently when we moved more rural commuted on a bus and we walked to the grocery store, and the skating rink.)

    What would I eat in Russia if I had no cooking facilities?
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  19. OliviaPug

    OliviaPug Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly what I was saying -- Leonova's experience is limited by her circumstances. I wish she had more flexibility in her current situation so that she could be happier and more comfortable in her training environment.

    O-
     
  20. shine

    shine Well-Known Member

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    Well, I don't know about the others but that's certainly not what I have been eating for the last 15 or so years that I have lived in Canada/the US. There's a good variety of options, why do you have to go for the worst? I also have a feeling that I spend way less on eating relatvely healthy food here than I'd otherwise spend in, say, Europe.

    Ah, I see.
     
  21. hanca

    hanca Well-Known Member

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    Maybe that's the problem. You know where to find proper food in USA or Canada but you would struggle to find proper food in Europe. We from Europe would know where to get proper food here but may struggle at your side of the ocean. And if you add the fact that she may have limited time to get food, limited facilities to prepare the food and possibly limited transport options to travel somewhere further to purchase the food, I wouldn't see anything offensive in what she said in the interview.

    By the way, when I went on holiday to the USA for 10 days I put on 5 kilos! And I was not intending to piggy out, I just ate what was available (but without chasing healthy food because I was busy with other things. I ate what was available).
     
  22. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    :rolleyes: There are other places around there, you know. You make it sound like there aren't any choices for a wholesome meal. That whiner can eat her lunch at the tire store. Or the Bergen County jailhouse.

    Ziggy can come visit me in my hellhole whenever he wants and I'll even drive him wherever he wants to go. I think I know where a couple of paved roads are.
     
  23. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    I have to go as far as the nearest grocery store. :drama:
     
  24. jeffisjeff

    jeffisjeff Well-Known Member

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    In your horse and buggy on those unpaved roads. :drama:
     
  25. kwanfan1818

    kwanfan1818 I <3 Kozuka

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    If you are a visitor and can't cook, or have a 60-80-hour work week where cooking is hard, if you're depending on a cafeteria like the Olympians or eating at the corporate cafeteria or eating out, reading labels is not possible.

    If you're someone from Europe who can cook for yourself here and assume that food is food, I.e. you can just go to the store and not get ketsup that is primarily sweetener, and no one has told you that you need to find organic food or deliberately need to seek out grass-fed meat, and not just grass fed (small print) grain-finished, and you're trying to sort out the difference between organic, free-range, etc. eggs, it's not uncommon to gain weight without changing ingredients or portion size.

    There's a reason besides government subsidy policies that food is cheap in much of North America: to buy heathy animal protein costs much more, but by European standards, where food is a much higher -- up to three times higher, and tnat includes smaller portion sizes -- than the NA household food budget. Plus, in Europe, restaurant ingredients tend not to have the crap that's in the food in NA restaurants.

    ETA: I think Ziggy is talking about sidewalks, not paved roads. Keep your damn buggies off our sidewalks :mitchell:
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  26. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    I'll agree with you for the most part- I prefer the European portion sizes and the rare occasion I eat out I immediatly put half my food in a to-go container. I don't think eating organic or grass-fed really affects weight, but overall health. But as for the 'crap' in our food, so far, none of our meat has been found to be horse. (That might change, but so far- it appears we have a better idea of what we are eating than many European countries.)
     
  27. Zemgirl

    Zemgirl Well-Known Member

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    Does horse meat count as crap, though? Is it unhealthy, or is the idea just icky? (I'm a vegetarian, so it's all icky to me ;)).

    I think the more processed food you eat and the less you cook from scratch, the more likely it is that you're eating some things that you much rather wouldn't, if you knew that they were there. I seriously doubt that the horse meat incident is proof that Americans all have a precise understanding on what they're eating while Europeans don't have a clue.

    I don't know what kind of produce is sold at the grocery stores some of the people here frequent, but I can't imagine it's as good as what you can find at a market, whether it's an American farmer's market or a less fancy one like where I shop.
     
  28. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa Épaulement!!!

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    kwanfan1818, fyi: there are lots of McDonalds in Russia & they are PACKED.

    If I were a skater watching my weight, and they all are, no matter what country I came from, I'd steer clear of rink food. I'd bring my own lunches and snacks, consisting mostly of veg, some fruit & lean protein.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  29. Southpaw

    Southpaw Saint Smugpawski

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    :eek: Sidewalks? Sidewalks????? Well, I'll just have to open the passenger door and push the boy out in Garfield if he wants to come to New Jersey for sidewalks.
     
  30. hanca

    hanca Well-Known Member

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    So far! If someone told me 6 months ago that I may have been eating horse meat, I wouldn't believe it either. Are you really, really sure that over there you have a better idea of what you are eating than in many European countries? The fact it, you can't say for sure that you are not eating it too! What you can say is that so far no one admitted to it yet, so it may mean that it is not horse meat, or it may mean that it wasn't discovered yet. (sorry for being cynical!)