A question about how Skaters keep their balance when not putting their arms out.

Discussion in 'Moves In The Field' started by FSWer, May 5, 2012.

  1. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    Ok,I've always wondered about this. We know that in order to keep your balance,we put our arms out like a scale. Which Skaters do on some moves. BUT...can any Skater out there help me understand how and why Skaters are able to find and keep their balance when doing a move that DOESN'T require putting their arms out? For example,the type of Spiral (I'm not sure if there is a special name for it), were the Skater is holding her Blade with 1 hand,and her Leg with the other. Such as in this link...http://www.iceskatingintnl.com/images/2006 Pacific Coast/Kimmie Jeffers JLFS 1.jpg Thanks.
     
  2. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    Skaters learn to balance on their blades the same way you balance on your feet. Putting your arms out helps with balance, but you don't have to do it. You don't have to put your arms out to stand on the floor, and with enough practice you wouldn't need to do it when you stand on the ice, either. Sometimes skaters put their arms out to help with balance, and other times they do it just because it looks nice.
     
  3. AndyWarhol

    AndyWarhol Well-Known Member

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    practice.
     
  4. Johnny_Fever

    Johnny_Fever Well-Known Member

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    Speed skaters spend a good portion of the race with hands behind back to reduce air resistance.
     
  5. leafygreens

    leafygreens Well-Known Member

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    With practice your body learns to rely on other muscles so you don't need your arms to assist as much.
     
  6. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    An example?
     
  7. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what you are asking for an example of.
     
  8. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    An example of how Skaters rely on other parts of their body.
     
  9. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    Well, as you learn to do a spiral, or learn to do it better, your core muscies in your abdomen, and your back and legs get stronger. So you don't have to hold your arms as still.
     
  10. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand.
     
  11. Sylvia

    Sylvia On to Nationals!

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    Think about it as learning to balance/center your hips over your skate blades as you're skating. The more stable you feel over your blades, the less you need your arms for extra balance.
     
  12. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    Wat is balance Centering?
     
  13. overedge

    overedge Well-Known Member

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    You're balanced when you're centred over a part of your body. When you're standing upright, you're balanced because you're centred vertically over your two legs. When you're doing a spiral on the ice, you're balanced because you're centred horizontally over the leg you're skating on.
     
  14. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    How do you do that though? Get balanced like that?
     
  15. Sylvia

    Sylvia On to Nationals!

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  16. Aussie Willy

    Aussie Willy Well-Known Member

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    Get your weight over one leg.
     
  17. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    FSWer, when you just stand normally on the floor in your shoes, you ARE balanced over your feet. Right? It's no different when you're on skates.

    Can you stand on one foot on the floor in your shoes? If you can, you are able to balance over that one foot. If you can't do it in shoes, you won't be able to do it in skates, either.

    If you CAN stand on one foot in shoes, you might still have some trouble on skates. Make sure you start with your feet close together before you pick up one foot. If your feet are far apart, you won't be balanced over the foot you want to stand on and you'll have to put the other foot down right away. Also, make sure that that skate you're trying to stand on is straight up and down. If you rock over to the inside edge, which is very common, you'll have to put the other foot down. This often happens if people don't have their skates tied tightly enough around the ankles.
     
  18. FSWer

    FSWer Well-Known Member

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    Don't you use your arms when balancing on one foot on the floor too?
     
  19. Clarice

    Clarice Active Member

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    No, I don't have to. I can stand on one foot with my arms at my sides if I want to. But if you need to stretch your arms out to help balance on one foot, you should do that.
     
  20. Aussie Willy

    Aussie Willy Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the person. Some do, some don't. There is no rule that you have to have your arms out to balance.
     
  21. zaphyre14

    zaphyre14 Well-Known Member

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    Look at babies, learning to walk. They hold their arms out for balance at first. But as they practice and learn to balance, then gradually they learn how to walk without using their arms. Now that you've been walking (and running) for many years, you don't need to use your arms for balance.

    Same thing with skating. Balance takes practice; the more you do it, the less you need your arms.
     
  22. Anita18

    Anita18 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, takes practice. You don't need your arms to balance while standing on two feet, but I bet you did when you were a baby and just learning. You might need to use your arms while balancing on one foot, but with enough practice, you won't need to either. I can stretch my thigh holding one foot to my butt and not need my arms to balance. Skating taught me that. :)

    I haven't skated for a long time (just getting back into the game), but if anything, it's shoulder orientation throwing me off, more than what my arms are doing.