22 Maps That Show the Deepest Linguistic Conflicts in America

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by Really, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. Really

    Really No longer just a "well-known member" Yay!

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  2. Garden Kitty

    Garden Kitty Tranquillo

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    Very interesting. Thanks for the link.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  3. Fridge_Break

    Fridge_Break Well-Known Member

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    Mr. Fridge Break and I were going through these yesterday (Southern Illinois vs. Michigan) and there were several conflicts... crayfish/crawfish, slaw/coleslaw... he smashed his head into the pillows when I called it a "drinking fountain" :lol:
     
  4. Dr.Siouxs

    Dr.Siouxs Well-Known Member

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    Fascinating :COP:
     
  5. Andrushka

    Andrushka Well-Known Member

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    this is a topic of conversation in my family all the time.My Mom recently had been working with a lot of Northerners apparently,she called a soda a "pop". I stopped her and said "What did you just say??Mother!Did you just call a soda a pop?!"...an hour North of here it's called "soda",here every soft drink is called a "coke"whether it's actually a coke or not. There are a lot of other linguistic differences,sometimes geographically not that far apart.
     
  6. paskatefan

    paskatefan Well-Known Member

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    This is fascinating. Thank you!
     
  7. BaileyCatts

    BaileyCatts Well-Known Member

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    It was always "pop" my whole life until we moved to Connecticut when I was in 11th grade. Then it was "soda". To me, a soda was a drink with ice cream and "pop" in it. :lol: What's funny is I only lived there 2 years and we moved back to the same city I lived in my whole life after I graduated high school, yet to this day I still call it soda instead of pop.

    Another new one on me when moving to Connecticut was that thing that women carry is called a purse. In CT they called a purse a pocketbook. To me, a pocketbook was your wallet, not your purse.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  8. quartz

    quartz the moment is a masterpiece

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    I live in SW Ontario. My family is in Michigan, Iowa, and California. Whenever we have a family reunion, (not often enough,:(), this is a topic of conversation that always comes up. My California family speaks closer to me; it's those Iowa and Michigan folks that say everything different!
     
  9. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    I wonder if he did soda/pop/soft drink or submarine/hero/gyro/grinder/hoagie.

    The only one that comes out different from the map for me is Caramel. I say Carmel even though I am an East Coaster. I got it from my mother, who is Scottish.
    I am from Maryland so we definitely say Boo-wie knife because of Bowie, Md. In fact, most of my friends called David Bowie "David Boo-wie" in the early 70s until we learned that is was Bow-ie.
     
  10. maatTheViking

    maatTheViking Now ubering Machida's hair

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    I so disappointed I don't have access to a brew-thru.

    that is all.
     
  11. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    No brew thrus here either. I am just happy that the county I live in on the weekend has Sunday liquor sales. The county I live in during the week does not.
     
  12. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    I'm more than a little surprised at this map -- I didn't realize that it was only in such a small region of the U.S. that Mary, merry, and marry were pronounced differently. :shuffle: Completely flummoxed that some pronounce merry the same as Mary and/or marry!
     
  13. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    For me, merry is different. Mary and Marry sound the same. But I know a lot of people from Long Island and New Jersey who say marry differently.
     
  14. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    :confused:

    Those are both among the 22 maps, though the sandwich one was phrased slightly differently.

    I question the validity of some of his findings. He puts me in "crawfish" country, for example, but I have never heard anyone around here call it anything other than a "crayfish."
     
  15. genegri

    genegri Active Member

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    I just moved down to Miami full time.

    Went to Subway for lunch today and no one seemed to understand me when I said "hoagie". Now I understand why.
     
  16. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    I didn't see it, but when I clicked sometimes I jumped a few maps ahead so I must have missed them.

    Just saw the sandwich one. I did think that Submarine was most common, but I thought Hoagie was not just SE Pennsylvania, but also central/south NJ. And I thought Hero was common in NYC and Western PA. And Grinder was common in Massachusetts, RI, and other parts of New England. And Poor Boy in Louisiana or at least New Orleans.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  17. skatingfan5

    skatingfan5 Well-Known Member

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    I pronounce "marry" with a much flatter "a" than "Mary", which I pronounce pretty close to "Mare-ee". :slinkaway
     
  18. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    I am totally appalled that "youse" did not make the list for how to address multiple people :mitchell:

    But I've been wondering for years why no one eats hoagies anymore (haven't lived in SE Pennsylvania for a very long time) :shuffle:
     
  19. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Ever since seeing this, I've been trying to figure out the difference between ahn and awn (both sound like on) Did them mean uhn? (Crayon)
     
  20. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    We just called them drive through liquor stores. When passengers could no longer drink in the car, they had to make special sealed cups and straws for their smoothies.
     
  21. GarrAarghHrumph

    GarrAarghHrumph I can kill you with my brain

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    It's "carmel" in eastern Mass. People say "car-a-mel" down here in this part of NY.
     
  22. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    If you pronounce 'merry' differently... how do you pronounce it? I pronounce all three the same.
     
  23. Skittl1321

    Skittl1321 Well-Known Member

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    Having grown up in Texas (and developing language there) but with New York/New Jersey parents, I have weird linguistic patterns (a professor in college who could place Texans to the county was unable to determine where I was from, after living there 16 years, because I speak so strangely- though generally described as 'accent free'- she got 42 out of 45 students right.).

    I say care-a-mel if I'm talking about the candy, but I say car-mel-o if talking about that specific Cadburry candy bar. My husband (native Texan) says "Care-melo, and Care-a-mel" he thinks it is bizarre I don't say both the same way...
     
  24. PRlady

    PRlady Smoking

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    People say "cray-yawn?" :eek:

    You guys are weird. And I go through Pee-CAHN pie arguments with my MA relatives every Thanksgiving. And of course I put sear-up on my pancakes; I seem to be from the heart of the sear-up belt.

    Mary, merry and marry are different, of course.

    Mary rhymes with hairy. Marry rhymes with Harry. Merry rhymes with ferry, berry and Terry.

    And it's a hoagie. :D
     
  25. Rob

    Rob Beach Bum

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    That is funny - I generally say Carmel but if I am talking about Cadbury Caramello bars, I say Car-a-mello.

    If Mary and Marry sound different, I think that Mary sounds like Mare-y while Marry sounds like Ma-Ry. And Merry is Mehr-Ry. If that makes any sense at all.
     
  26. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    Which is to say, all of these words rhyme with each other. :shuffle:
     
  27. PRlady

    PRlady Smoking

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    I used to know the linguistic marks, but they're in the story I think. Mary is mair-ee. Marry is marre -- ee. Merry is Mehr -- ee.
     
  28. Prancer

    Prancer Jawwalking Staff Member

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    :lol: That clarifies nothing, as all of those sound the same to people who say Mary, merry, and marry the same way.

    A hoagie is a type of sub, not a generic sub :p.

    Don't we have this discussion every summer? Where's the map for jimmies, sprinkles and whatever else those things are called? And the map for different types of ice cream cones? And (this one is always good for starting some real :argue:) the map for people who look at greasy and say "greesee" versus those who say "greezee."

    :lynch: All y'all talk funny.
     
  29. michiruwater

    michiruwater Well-Known Member

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    I was going to say, all of those words sound exactly the same :lol:
     
  30. Vagabond

    Vagabond Well-Known Member

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    Right. And they all sound the same. :p