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Jenny
02-07-2013, 10:51 PM
Yes - in fact although I don't otherwise drink wine, once I developed a taste for Champagne I quickly discovered prosecco, and cava as well. There are also a lot of excellent sparkling wines from California that are not allowed to be called Champagne but are just as good, and priced somewhere in that very large gap between the "real thing" and its far less expensive Italian and Spanish counterparts. And you'll die when I tell you the price difference here - a bottle of Moet or Veuve here costs TWICE what I paid when I was living in NY - about $65 a bottle, as opposed to prosecco, which is never more than about $14.

Oh yes my friend, prosecco and I are well acquainted :)

cruisin
02-08-2013, 12:29 AM
Yes - in fact although I don't otherwise drink wine, once I developed a taste for Champagne I quickly discovered prosecco, and cava as well. There are also a lot of excellent sparkling wines from California that are not allowed to be called Champagne but are just as good, and priced somewhere in that very large gap between the "real thing" and its far less expensive Italian and Spanish counterparts. And you'll die when I tell you the price difference here - a bottle of Moet or Veuve here costs TWICE what I paid when I was living in NY - about $65 a bottle, as opposed to prosecco, which is never more than about $14.

Oh yes my friend, prosecco and I are well acquainted :)

:) I LOVE it!

Champagne can only be called Champagne if it's from the Champagne region of France (you probably know that :)). I've had excellent Cava. It seems a bit sweeter than Prosecco, though just a tiny bit.

First time I had Prosecco was in Italy. We were in Venice and went to Harry's Bar and had the famous Belini (Prosecco with pureed white peach). It was amazing! Then I had some Prosecco without the peach, just as amazing. They told us, in Italy that they use some of their best white grapes for their Proseccos. I find them to be lighter and less foamy than Champagne.

I was in Sonoma about a two years ago. Had a wonderful white sparkling wine. I forget what they called, but it was quite similar to Prosecco.

reckless
02-08-2013, 12:48 AM
That fudge sounds more like a flourless cake. I make around 6 lbs. of fudge every year for Christmas and the condensed milk (or evaporated milk, whichever recipe I use), has to be cooked with the sugar for at least 15 minutes (about 240 with a candy thermometer). then you add the vanilla, chocolate, etc. Most recipes do not recommend using a microwave for chocolate, it dries it out.
I make a fudge with condensed milk and chocolate chips that takes about 5 minutes to make. It definitely does not have the consistency of flourless chocolate cake. I melt the chips, condensed milk, a tiny bit of vanillla and a pinch of salt together until the chips are fully melted. It's great fudge.

Also, that recipe is from Sherry Yard, a James Beard-award winning pastry chef. After looking over her bio (http://www.starchefs.com/cook/chefs/bio/pastry-chef-sherry-yard), I'll give her the benefit of the doubt and say that she probably knows the difference between fudge and flourless chocolate cake.

cruisin
02-08-2013, 01:59 PM
I make a fudge with condensed milk and chocolate chips that takes about 5 minutes to make. It definitely does not have the consistency of flourless chocolate cake. I melt the chips, condensed milk, a tiny bit of vanillla and a pinch of salt together until the chips are fully melted. It's great fudge.

Also, that recipe is from Sherry Yard, a James Beard-award winning pastry chef. After looking over her bio (http://www.starchefs.com/cook/chefs/bio/pastry-chef-sherry-yard), I'll give her the benefit of the doubt and say that she probably knows the difference between fudge and flourless chocolate cake.

I have made many kinds of fudge. Some call for melting the chocolate (though never in a microwave) and then adding ingredients. Most call for making the candy base and melting the chocolate by adding it to the boiling hot candy. The recipes where I melt the chocolate first always get an oily residue on top, which I have to blot off. The candy method is always perfect. But, it takes a lot more time.

I am sure that Ms. Yard knows the difference between fudge and a flourless cake. But, it may be that she wants the fudge less soft, in order to cut the statuettes and not have them droop.

Impromptu
02-18-2013, 05:54 PM
Good idea for the red velvet carpet cake - I might try that. For Silver Linings Playbook, how about Raisin Bran Trail Mix (somewhat like this recipe: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/trail-mix-50400000123280/ )

Spareoom
02-20-2013, 06:18 AM
Or if you want something more substantial, mini Philly cheesesteak sliders. The movie is quite Philadelphia so that would fit nicely.

Cachoo
02-20-2013, 05:13 PM
No suggestions--just wanted to say how much I've enjoyed reading this thread and how jealous I am of your guests Icetalavista! Please tell us the details afterward too.