PDA

View Full Version : UPDATED Connecticut elementary school shooting - 20+ dead (incl gunman)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 [30] 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

Vash01
12-18-2012, 04:32 PM
One member of my Toastmasters club used to work with therapy dogs. She gave a speech on them and even brought one to the meeting. They are trained dogs. I would feel very comfortable if they are around. It's nice that they have been brought to NewTown.

BlueRidge
12-18-2012, 04:37 PM
I cannot imagine anything that would comfort me more than having a dog to hug at a time of coping with something horrific.

And no, stuffed animals are not the same!

I have great admiration for the people that train dogs to do this and offer them in time of need.

*Jen*
12-18-2012, 04:59 PM
I cannot imagine anything that would comfort me more than having a dog to hug at a time of coping with something horrific.

And no, stuffed animals are not the same!

I have great admiration for the people that train dogs to do this and offer them in time of need.

Me too. A family friend of ours died some years ago, and his sons really struggled to come to terms with their father's sudden death. The older boy took to just sitting with our old dog and talking to her. Dogs can bring immense comfort, they're such lovely creatures.

AxelAnnie
12-18-2012, 05:14 PM
Jenny,

You make some great points. People did have guns for their personal enjoyment (target shooting, hunting and protection). All perfectly legal and perfectly fine.
And it was a different time. Can you imagine Beaver (Leave it to Beaver) going on a rampage? No. People worked things out at home, or with people. They didn't take their anger or problem and work it out in isolation on their computer with horrid games, and nameless strangers.

I think gangs have a huge impact on the conversation. But those are not legal guns, and those are not good people. You may change the weapon....but you won't change the violence. You will just get an IED lobbed into the community center.

I think the media carries some culpability in all this. The 24 hour news cycle, the desire to "get the scoop" whether true or not....the constant barage of stupid speculation (he had Asburgers.......ok so? He didn't have it. He might have had something. He was a genius because he got a 3.0 in a college level course........that's all it takes to be a genius?) It is all about fault and blame....how much fault can we find, and how quickly can we assign blame.

This kid, by all accounts, was not socially comfortable. He had problems....whatever they were, and what ever the cause. And....biggest problem....a mother who knew she had a problem with her son, and not only kept an array of guns around, but thought learning to shoot would raise his self-esteem. What kind of twisted logic was at work there?

There is lots of things that went wrong with this boy.......but the guns were the smallest part of the equation. IMO, it is a false comfort to think that if we fix the guns, we fix the problem.

AragornElessar
12-18-2012, 05:56 PM
I think the biggest problem is we don't actually talk to each other anymore. We tweet or talk on Facebook, but how many of us actually talk to people these days of things at a breakneck speed? It just seems to me that more things are falling through the cracks these days than ever before and simply because we've gotten into the habit to not talking to each other. Or even talking about a problem to work it out.

Maybe that's just me, but...

Just got home about twenty minutes ago, but on the way home in the back of my Sister's car, I was listening to one of the many copies of Les Mis that's on my iPod and for the first time since Friday, heard Bring Him Home. I was literally biting on my lip to keep from sobbing, but the tears were flowing pretty freely. The lyrics just so fit w/Friday and...

Yeah.

missing
12-18-2012, 06:16 PM
This kid, by all accounts, was not socially comfortable. He had problems....whatever they were, and what ever the cause. And....biggest problem....a mother who knew she had a problem with her son, and not only kept an array of guns around, but thought learning to shoot would raise his self-esteem. What kind of twisted logic was at work there?

There is lots of things that went wrong with this boy.......but the guns were the smallest part of the equation. IMO, it is a false comfort to think that if we fix the guns, we fix the problem.

A person who is not socially comfortable, who has problems, can indeed bring sadness to himself and those who love him.

But a person who is not socially comfortable, who has both problems and weapons, can kill 27 people.

There's no one solution for the problem of violence in America. But to think guns aren't part of the problem, and don't need to be part of the solution, is absurd.

BlueRidge
12-18-2012, 06:49 PM
There are a heck of a lot of people who as teens and young adults are not socially comfortable. More than a few of the descriptions of this guy from acquaintances sound like they could be describing me when I was that age. Its kind of chilling, really. Most weird non-communicative kids do not end up like this guy.

Anita18
12-18-2012, 07:11 PM
There are a heck of a lot of people who as teens and young adults are not socially comfortable. More than a few of the descriptions of this guy from acquaintances sound like they could be describing me when I was that age. Its kind of chilling, really. Most weird non-communicative kids do not end up like this guy.
I have loved ones who'd definitely stand in a corner and be awkward while in a group of people. (Jon Stewart was reportedly like this when he was younger too.) None of them have even raised their voice at me, besides my father yelling at me to do homework. :P Trying to ostracize all introverted socially-awkward people as potential mass murderers isn't doing anyone any favors.

Cachoo
12-18-2012, 07:29 PM
Perhaps this has already been covered but why is it boys and young men who do this? Girls can be isolated, ostracized and shy too. How did Lanza get from point A --being introverted as so many of us have experienced---to point Z in doing the unthinkable? Why is it always males? I'm mystified by this.

BlueRidge
12-18-2012, 07:42 PM
We don't know yet, but I think most people are not assuming that Lanza was simply an introverted person. I think most people expect he suffered from a mental disorder of some kind, probably severely.

Females suffering from such disorders don't seem to commit massacres. I don't know if anyone knows why.

Jenny
12-18-2012, 07:56 PM
The only one I can think of is the girl who was the basis for the song "I Don't Like Mondays" - that was in 1979 - two adults killed and a bunch of kids injured at a school in San Diego.

my little pony
12-18-2012, 08:04 PM
a girl by me shot up our local mall in the 80s

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/mass/sylvia_seegrist/index.html

Susan1
12-18-2012, 08:05 PM
Me too. A family friend of ours died some years ago, and his sons really struggled to come to terms with their father's sudden death. The older boy took to just sitting with our old dog and talking to her. Dogs can bring immense comfort, they're such lovely creatures.

I understand that completely. About a month after my mom died (2005), one of the ladies at work had taken the day off and brought her little puppy by the office after their grooming appt. She brought her over to me and I just sat there and worked with her in my lap while this lady was visiting other people in office. And I even took her outside on her leash in the yard. My boss didn't care at all.

I just worry about the dogs that have this "job" to do every day.

jeffisjeff
12-18-2012, 08:05 PM
In the Mother Jones article from just a few months ago, 62 mass shootings were documented over the past 30 years in the US. Some of the statistics:


Half of the cases involved school or workplace shootings (12 and 19, respectively); the other 31 cases took place in locations including shopping malls, restaurants, government buildings, and military bases. Forty four of the killers were white males. Only one of them was a woman. (See Goleta, Calif., in 2006.) The average age of the killers was 35, though the youngest among them was a mere 11 years old. (See Jonesboro, Ark., in 1998.) A majority were mentally ill—and displayed signs of it before setting out to kill.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/07/mass-shootings-map

Anita18
12-18-2012, 08:13 PM
We don't know yet, but I think most people are not assuming that Lanza was simply an introverted person. I think most people expect he suffered from a mental disorder of some kind, probably severely.

Females suffering from such disorders don't seem to commit massacres. I don't know if anyone knows why.
Most sane people are, but the speculation by the media about his awkwardness are starting to make me :lynch: