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barbk
12-11-2012, 09:35 PM
A Russian writer wrote a book about Americans (ordinary, suburban-type Americans) for the edification of Russians. I found the article about it fascinating. (Just like we don't think we have accents, how easy it is to think that the way we do something is normal, when to someone from a different culture it might look very strange indeed.)
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/11/world/europe/book-gives-russians-close-up-of-american-minutiae.html

Any Russian-speaking FSU'ers read it?

Cachoo
12-11-2012, 10:34 PM
I love the bit about the Wrigley's gum advertisements.

PRlady
12-11-2012, 10:56 PM
I would like to read Tinami's review. :shuffle:

Alixana
12-11-2012, 11:33 PM
“You can’t suddenly show up at a friend’s house in the middle of the night with a bottle of vodka, to talk over your problems and seek support,”

Well, you can, but be prepared for me to fall asleep on you! ;)

Jimena
12-11-2012, 11:46 PM
I'd love to read that book.

A lot of what he says are things that I can relate to, especially when you arrive to the US from a very close knit culture, which completely hinges on "family".

ChelleC
12-12-2012, 01:54 AM
Fascinating article. I'd love to read the book too.

barbk
12-12-2012, 04:28 AM
I would like to read Tinami's review. :shuffle:

Me too.

Nan
12-12-2012, 03:31 PM
I would love to read this. I think it's importent for me to understand how my customs are seen by people outside my country.

milanessa
12-12-2012, 04:10 PM
Can't find it on Amazon for some reason.

danceronice
12-12-2012, 04:23 PM
At least I would hope Russians, being from a country that size, would not have the issue some western Europeans do when they get here--not grasping the size of things. Of course New Englanders sometimes have the same problem (this is Michigan-you can drive six hours and over a major bridge and STILL be in the same state.)

skatingfan5
12-12-2012, 04:32 PM
At least I would hope Russians, being from a country that size, would not have the issue some western Europeans do when they get here--not grasping the size of things. Of course New Englanders sometimes have the same problem (this is Michigan-you can drive six hours and over a major bridge and STILL be in the same state.)I think that a lot of New Englanders are well aware of the differential of "size" for various states. After all, several of them border on New York, which isn't exactly miniscule (driving across on the thruway took quite a while, iirc). :shuffle:


Can't find it on Amazon for some reason.The NYT article didn't have any links to the book -- perhaps it's not available in the U.S. I'm assuming that it is written in Russian, not English, as well. I could be wrong about that, but if true, then that would greatly reduce its marketability in the U.S.

FarFarAway
12-12-2012, 04:33 PM
:D Even twelve hours ride won't take you out of the region where I live :) you will be just approaching it's borders.

Vagabond
12-12-2012, 04:35 PM
“You can’t suddenly show up at a friend’s house in the middle of the night with a bottle of vodka, to talk over your problems and seek support,”

I wonder how many times he tried before he was able to take this as an established fact.

:watch:

julieann
12-12-2012, 05:16 PM
Cul-de-sac translates in Russian as tupik — a word that evokes vulnerability and danger, a dead end with no escape.

:rofl:

America is so big and I've lived from one end to the other and people are so different depending on the region. I'm not sure one could generalize America without seeing the country/its people from end to end.

taf2002
12-12-2012, 05:51 PM
:D Even twelve hours ride won't take you out of the region where I live :) you will be just approaching it's borders.

So when you visit the US you need to come to Texas so you'll feel right at home. Don't come in mid-summer though.