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Rex
12-02-2012, 02:18 AM
American Pyschiatric Association's diagnostic manual DSM-V, to drop Aspergers! (http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20121201/US.MED.Mental.Disorders/)


Full details of all the revisions will come next May when the American Psychiatric Association's new diagnostic manual is published, but the impact will be huge, affecting millions of children and adults worldwide. The manual also is important for the insurance industry in deciding what treatment to pay for, and it helps schools decide how to allot special education. What does this bode for people with diagnoses that fall under the spectrum that need the definition to justify it to their insurance companies?? They don't say anything about "true" autism (which is safe), but Asperger's. Educational benefits won't be affected, but now people (and those with children who previously fell under the Asperger spectrum), will have to be rediagnosed with other disorders...


One of the most hotly argued changes was how to define the various ranges of autism. Some advocates opposed the idea of dropping the specific diagnosis for Asperger's disorder. People with that disorder often have high intelligence and vast knowledge on narrow subjects but lack social skills. Some who have the condition embrace their quirkiness and vow to continue to use the label.

Wyliefan
12-02-2012, 02:30 AM
Wow, I can't believe they're doing that! Doesn't sound like a very good idea . . .

Rex
12-02-2012, 02:38 AM
I'm sure most will be re-diagnosed with some sort of social anxiety disorder. But Asperger's was THE mental illness diagnosis of the 21st century it seemed, Wylie. Even Bill Gates and Steven Spielberg were rumored to have it. Guess they are just plain ol' geeks now. :P.

Wyliefan
12-02-2012, 02:52 AM
You hear about it a lot, that's for sure. I work with a guy who has it (and is a single father raising a son who has a very severe case of it). I'll be interested to hear his take on this.

PrincessLeppard
12-02-2012, 03:28 AM
Every socially awkward kid in my school gets hit with the Asperger's label. I think the description is too generic, and sometimes, awkward people are just awkward.

However, I'm not sure this is the solution, either.

Angelskates
12-02-2012, 03:51 AM
Every socially awkward kid in my school gets hit with the Asperger's label. I think the description is too generic, and sometimes, awkward people are just awkward.

However, I'm not sure this is the solution, either.

I agree. Since Aspergers is a form of autism, it will force psychlogists to really make a decision, autistic or not. IMO, the Aspergers label has been too freely given, much like ADHD.

Anita18
12-02-2012, 04:34 AM
Every socially awkward kid in my school gets hit with the Asperger's label. I think the description is too generic, and sometimes, awkward people are just awkward.

However, I'm not sure this is the solution, either.
I agree there is a difference between socially awkward and what Asperger's is considered to be. When a kid is young and unable to communicate clearly in the first place, I think it's too soon to throw a diagnosis on them.

Alf is socially awkward, but he cares about how I feel. He's just extremely shy and self-conscious.

I always suspected my cousin has Asperger's, although I don't believe he's ever been officially diagnosed. But he shows all the signs: being interested in tiny technical details, having no social filter, not being interested in people, the whole works. He in his mid-20s and doing fine in life, since he's very book smart and happened upon an industry where his programming/work skills are much more prized than his social skills. He makes a lot of money and AFAIK, he is happy. AFAIK his parents have not pressured him to get married or have kids. I believe as long as people accept them as they are and steer them toward a career that will value their skills, they will do perfectly fine and require little to no intervention. There's nothing really "wrong" with them - it's just an attitude adjustment for a society who thinks that everyone should be a social butterfly. They are just different.

If anything, having that diagnosis of Asperger's might open a parent's eyes that their child IS different and may require a different kind of parenting , especially if the family is more gregarious than mine is. I mean, I come from a family of extremely nerdy introverts, so an Asperger's child wouldn't really be anything out of the ordinary for us. But for a family who loves to go out and socialize, it might make a difference. You can't pressure an Asperger's kid to be different from what they are.

MacMadame
12-02-2012, 08:46 AM
Every socially awkward kid in my school gets hit with the Asperger's label. I think the description is too generic, and sometimes, awkward people are just awkward.
I agree with that. I also think our society loves to throw labels at people as if labeling things solves problems.



If anything, having that diagnosis of Asperger's might open a parent's eyes that their child IS different and may require a different kind of parenting , especially if the family is more gregarious than mine is. I mean, I come from a family of extremely nerdy introverts, so an Asperger's child wouldn't really be anything out of the ordinary for us. But for a family who loves to go out and socialize, it might make a difference. You can't pressure an Asperger's kid to be different from what they are.
Alternately, putting a label like that might make a family treat their kid like there is something wrong with them when a lot of these kids are perfectly fine and grow up into happy adults because they make life choices that suit them.

Anita18
12-02-2012, 10:11 AM
Alternately, putting a label like that might make a family treat their kid like there is something wrong with them when a lot of these kids are perfectly fine and grow up into happy adults because they make life choices that suit them.
True. It really does depend on the family. Ours never held much importance over social standing, and my uncle was extremely proud that his son could do computer programming and even help him at his computer software company, at the age of 12. So it worked out even if he's never been officially diagnosed. :P I'm not sure what my aunt and uncle expect of him when he gets older, though. I'm hoping they won't pressure him into marriage, because with the money he's making and his social cluelessness, I'm afraid he might get a gold-digger who'll take advantage of him. :o

The only thing one really needs to do is adjust their expectations, not hoist "treatments" or "special education" on otherwise really smart kids. If you expect your child to be really popular and a social butterfly and work with people, that expectation will have to be adjusted. It's more training the parents than treating the kids. :lol:

ballettmaus
12-02-2012, 03:33 PM
Alternately, putting a label like that might make a family treat their kid like there is something wrong with them when a lot of these kids are perfectly fine and grow up into happy adults because they make life choices that suit them.

Well, kids/people who really do have Asperger's are not "perfectly fine". Asperger's is the weakest form of autism and I know two people who have it and they are not just socially awkward or different. It's far more than that.

I do agree, however, that people love to throw labels at people to solve problems and that that needs to change! It's not helping anyone and those who have Asperger's (in that case) have to suffer because doctor's are too lazy to do a more thorough job. That isn't right.

Aceon6
12-02-2012, 03:38 PM
I just read a fairly comprehensive writeup in my Sunday Boston Globe. Asperger's as a standalone diagnosis is being dropped, as is autism. Instead, there's a single "autism spectrum disorder" with a severity scale. It may take insurance companies time to adjust (and they're still coping with ICD-10), but responsible insurers shouldn't have any problems with the change. Similarly, gender related diagnoses are being consolidated.

Really
12-02-2012, 04:02 PM
We've been seeing ASD in our students' psych reports for several years now. I wondered if that's what was going to replace distinct autism or Asperger's diagnoses.

Wyliefan
12-02-2012, 06:27 PM
It may take insurance companies time to adjust (and they're still coping with ICD-10), but responsible insurers shouldn't have any problems with the change.

That's good.

Rex
12-02-2012, 06:38 PM
I just read a fairly comprehensive writeup in my Sunday Boston Globe. Asperger's as a standalone diagnosis is being dropped, as is autism. Instead, there's a single "autism spectrum disorder" with a severity scale. It may take insurance companies time to adjust (and they're still coping with ICD-10), but responsible insurers shouldn't have any problems with the change. Similarly, gender related diagnoses are being consolidated.

I would love to read this; can you provide us with a link? Do we have to pay for it?

At one point my shrink ruled out Aspergers' for me.

Turns out I'm just a big queen with a geek streak...

Southpaw
12-02-2012, 07:30 PM
Turns out I'm just a big queen with a geek streak...

That may be but in my book you are DY-NO-MITE!!!!!!!