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View Full Version : Houston? Mars Base Here, Curiosity Has LANDED!!!



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AragornElessar
08-06-2012, 06:42 AM
Watching on CNN and it sounds like it was a perfect deploy and landing!!!

They've already gotten back pictures and they think they could get two more before the Odyssey satellite moves out of range.

This is was beyond huge risk for possible huge reward, but they pulled it off!!!

Can't wait to see the discoveries and also the pictures this robot's going to make over the years. :D :D :D

julieann
08-06-2012, 07:19 AM
Watching on CNN and it sounds like it was a perfect deploy and landing!!!

They've already gotten back pictures and they think they could get two more before the Odyssey satellite moves out of range.

This is was beyond huge risk for possible huge reward, but they pulled it off!!!

Can't wait to see the discoveries and also the pictures this robot's going to make over the years. :D :D :D

It was an awesome thing to watch!!!

AragornElessar
08-06-2012, 08:59 AM
It really was!!

I was having a tough time making it till 1:25am when I turned on the TV and CNN. That changed in a hurry. :D Now I'm so wired, I don't know what to do w/myself and that's not a good thing w/a big day of Olympics watching ahead of me. :D

IT *WORKED*!!!!! :D :D :D

skatesindreams
08-06-2012, 04:29 PM
This is such important and wonderful achievement/milestone.
Kudos to all concerned.
Very excited for all the discoveries to come in the years ahead.

susan6
08-06-2012, 05:33 PM
I have to admit, I thought that Rube Goldberg landing procedure was never going to work. But it was great to watch CNN's live coverage of the JPL last night (way to drop the ball, MSNBC and FOX) and see the celebration as they got indications of success and finally photos from the lander. (Look at all those dorky engineers and scientists cheering.....they're MY PEOPLE!!) Hopefully this success will induce the government to give NASA more funding. I want someone walking on Mars in my lifetime.

And now that we know that "sky crane" contraption actually works....that thing looks like a hoverboard. Can hovercars be far behind? Jet packs? The "party board" from Futurama? Make that happen, somebody!

pilgrimsoul
08-06-2012, 07:34 PM
I love smart people. <happy sigh> Well done, NASA.

love_skate2011
08-06-2012, 09:27 PM
I hope it doesnt bring anything like the black liquid from Prometheus :drama:

orbitz
08-06-2012, 10:32 PM
I hope it doesnt bring anything like the black liquid from Prometheus :drama:

No need to worry. The Curiosity wasn't designed to be able to fly back to Earth :)

love_skate2011
08-06-2012, 10:39 PM
No need to worry. The Curiosity wasn't designed to be able to fly back to Earth :)

thank goodness , lol :cheer:

professordeb
08-06-2012, 11:48 PM
I was watching the news for a bit and they showed the reactions of the "peeps". My son and hubby thought it was funny, I was simply glad for them.

PeterG
08-07-2012, 01:26 AM
Sorry if this is off-topic, but I'm confused. On the news, they said something about how this project cost in the billions. And that one thing they were hoping to find was if Mars could have sustained life at one time. Is there a possibility that if life existed on Mars that it ceased to exist because of lack of water?

What I'm wondering about is us humans. We know people on our planet die because they don't have healthy water. According to water.org, almost 10,000 humans die every day due to lack of water. Add to that, deaths because of lack of food, shelter, medical care, etc. The numbers would be staggering.

So how does any human justify projects like the Mars one? I just spent 15 minutes googling the cost of this project to compare it to the cost of providing water for all humans on our planet. Not only could I not find a figure, I could not even find an exact name for this project.

I talked to a friend at lunch today and I said that if I had to explain to a parent why his/her child will die because we choose to put money towards project like this, I had no idea how I could justify it. I'm totally confused by projects like this!

Cachoo
08-07-2012, 01:36 AM
Peter I think we must keep exploring in the event that someday--for whatever reason-- we may be forced to leave the planet. Of course this sort of research is in it's infancy and I think we need to move forward.
When it comes to the life saving projects you speak of my question is why we must spend so much on defense. I think we spend more than many countries combined. Or the war chests that have developed since the Citizens United Supreme Court decision. To spend that much on elections (mostly tearing each other down) seems criminal to me. Space exploration is noble and one day may prove life saving. I would rather pick on other programs before we pick on this project.

susan6
08-07-2012, 02:05 AM
Sorry if this is off-topic, but I'm confused. On the news, they said something about how this project cost in the billions. And that one thing they were hoping to find was if Mars could have sustained life at one time. Is there a possibility that if life existed on Mars that it ceased to exist because of lack of water?

What I'm wondering about is us humans. We know people on our planet die because they don't have healthy water. According to water.org, almost 10,000 humans die every day due to lack of water. Add to that, deaths because of lack of food, shelter, medical care, etc. The numbers would be staggering.

So how does any human justify projects like the Mars one? I just spent 15 minutes googling the cost of this project to compare it to the cost of providing water for all humans on our planet. Not only could I not find a figure, I could not even find an exact name for this project.

I talked to a friend at lunch today and I said that if I had to explain to a parent why his/her child will die because we choose to put money towards project like this, I had no idea how I could justify it. I'm totally confused by projects like this!

The price tag I've seen on the Curiosity program is about 2.5 billion. Worth it? Totally.

You want to save some serious money (20 billion), tell the military to ease up on the air-conditioning.

http://gizmodo.com/5813257/air-conditioning-our-military-costs-more-than-nasas-entire-budget

Anita18
08-07-2012, 02:10 AM
Peter I think we must keep exploring in the event that someday--for whatever reason-- we may be forced to leave the planet. Of course this sort of research is in it's infancy and I think we need to move forward.
When it comes to the life saving projects you speak of my question is why we must spend so much on defense. I think we spend more than many countries combined. Or the war chests that have developed since the Citizens United Supreme Court decision. To spend that much on elections (mostly tearing each other down) seems criminal to me. Space exploration is noble and one day may prove life saving. I would rather pick on other programs before we pick on this project.
I agree. Science is always for the betterment of humankind, even if its immediate application isn't clear today.

I'm not just saying this because I work in basic research figuring out how cells repair their own DNA so we can see how cancer forms. :P I suppose "cancer research" is more topical than "space exploration," but it's still decades before we can find or develop drugs for the processes I'm studying.

Anita18
08-07-2012, 02:16 AM
BTW, I missed the live stream landing last night since we got home from a road trip late. Is there a good YouTube link for the exciting stuff?