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View Full Version : Would you know if something in your food is good or bad for you?



Aussie Willy
07-16-2012, 11:33 PM
Listening to the radio this morning, the guy was talking about Permeate Free milk which appears to be the latest marketing ploy by one of the milk companies. On doing a search on just what Permeate is, I found this on the website of the company who is promoting their milk as Permeate feee.

http://dairyfarmers.com.au/permeatefree.html?gclid=CIHG4N-cn7ECFcIlpAodomQUWQ

What is interesting is that reading through this, they have actually taken it out just to reduce the amount of processing in the product. But it is actually a good part of the milk.

But my question is, how many people would actually be aware that this is a substance in milk? And if people don't understand what is would it influence them to buy the milk?

Buzz
07-17-2012, 12:09 AM
I read the labels of food stuffs all the time but they are often hard to understand.

Japanfan
07-17-2012, 01:18 AM
It seems that more food is bad for you than good for you. Non-organic produce can actually be harmful, but you don't know that organic is all that it claims to be either. Then there is fructose, trans fats, mercury in fish, hormones in meat. . .and apparently the substance they put on the lids of canned goods is carcinogenic.

I'm a hedonist at heart and find that all this information doesn't make me want to eat healthier and put all the time and energy that some people I know put into shopping and cooking healthy etc.

It just confuses me and makes me disinterested in food.

ballettmaus
07-17-2012, 01:30 AM
It seems that more food is bad for you than good for you. Non-organic produce can actually be harmful, but you don't know that organic is all that it claims to be either.

At least, organic gets controlled and has rules to follow or it cannot be called organic.
I don't know how strict those rules are in the US but Germany, as far as I know, has pretty strict rules and a farmer can lose an organic status pretty easily but then has to wait several years to regain it. A farmer cannot just say now I'm going to go organic and call his produce organic. There's a transition period and he gets monitored.

As far as knowing what is good and bad for one's health, I guess it's pretty difficult to differentiate especially since there is so much stuff that advertising wants people to believe his healthy when it isn't (thinking about all those kid snacks, for example, they advertise as containing fiber or milk or vitamin C or whatever)
I think googling is probably the only way to know whether it's good or bad and even then it may be difficult to judge because you get different opinions.

Anita18
07-17-2012, 01:44 AM
My general rule is as unprocessed as possible, although we still do stuff like canned tomato paste. Whatever chemical is possibly leaching from the cans is probably so little to be essentially ignored, as long as you don't eat like, 50 cans a day.

Organic in the US is probably the same thing as "organic" in other places, but my French friend was telling me how every piece of beef in France is pretty much organic by US standards. Our unlabelled stuff is pretty piss poor compared to a lot of other places, but there's also the crazy stuff you find on the streets of China as well. So it's six of one, half-dozen of the other.

I mostly don't worry about it, and I'm a biologist. As long as what I eat somewhat resembles the organism it came from, it's pretty much good enough for me. :lol:

Japanfan
07-17-2012, 02:11 AM
My general rule is as unprocessed as possible, although we still do stuff like canned tomato paste. Whatever chemical is possibly leaching from the cans is probably so little to be essentially ignored, as long as you don't eat like, 50 cans a day.

I mostly don't worry about it, and I'm a biologist. As long as what I eat somewhat resembles the organism it came from, it's pretty much good enough for me. :lol:

:respec:

I'll borrow that rule of thumb, thanks. IMO it beats living in a constant state of paranoia about what's in your food.

Anita18
07-17-2012, 03:33 AM
:respec:

I'll borrow that rule of thumb, thanks. IMO it beats living in a constant state of paranoia about what's in your food.
My fiance's mom is like that. It gets old really really fast. :lol: Plus you do know that studies come out every year refuting the findings of previous studies. ;) I figure, if it's something we've been eating for a long time, it must be pretty safe. And if it's been processed, it's still better than Twinkies. :lol:

That's how I justify my love of orange juice. :lol: I know many doctors say it's as bad as soda, but at least it came from oranges, you know! I have no idea where soda comes from. :lol:

Aussie Willy
07-17-2012, 03:37 AM
I mostly don't worry about it, and I'm a biologist. As long as what I eat somewhat resembles the organism it came from, it's pretty much good enough for me. :lol:

ITA. It is very hard to avoid processed food so I think this makes a lot of sense.

Prancer
07-17-2012, 03:54 AM
If you have a smartphone, Fooducate (http://www.fooducate.com/) can be helpful. You scan in the barcode on a food and the app tells you about the food.

A couple of sample reports:

http://www.fooducate.com/app#page=product&id=20AFDD6A-169F-11E0-BF92-FEFD45A4D471

http://www.fooducate.com/app#page=product&id=D330EB0A-E107-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471