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Quintuple
07-12-2012, 11:08 AM
Hah. I've been at my company for more than 1.5 years, finally got an orientation after a year, and they also said they were "out" of employee handbooks and still haven't officially gotten one to me. I also have had no review and no performance goals set. And yes, there's policy behind all of that - I work with the group that administers all of it! They have time to make videos and posters about our great new competencies, but after a whole year I still have no set expectations? And yes, I've politely brought this up to my supervisor more than once. We've been around more than a 70 years and we're international. Love it.

snoopy
07-12-2012, 11:51 AM
Two things:

1) if the IBS is only impacting your work 4 days a year, I agree not to say anything either. If it is more chronic than that, I would tell my boss AND immediately after that tell my boss my plan to make up any missed time by staying late or working through lunches, etc. to make it clear that I will not let my condition have a negative impact on my performance.

2) wrt handbooks and policies, in most cases companies being lax in that area will not matter to the employers position - because really most people don't pursue anything because it is a pain in the butt to do so. However, should there ever be an employment practices case against the company, the lack of those things will count against them in arbitration/court. Those types of policies are always looked at in the evaluation of a discrimination, harrassment etc case. This type of stuff still happens. I just had a potential client lose an employment practices suit and incur a $1MM settlement wrt a long time employee.

MacMadame
07-12-2012, 04:55 PM
Even in mature industries and older companies, orientation and formal policies can be bad to nonexistent.

Good point.

On another issues, in terms of suing a company for wrongful termination, there generally has to be some sort of grounds for a discrimination complaint when you work in an at-will state. (Not 100%, but the majority of the time) and it has to be something where you belong to a protected class or have a recognized disability.

Having recently been through this will a former company myself, I found the whole process very interesting and it's often not what people expect. It's usually not enough to just be "right" and the company be "wrong" in how they let you go.

Finally I find it somewhat amusing that people are telling Smiley to "learn from her mistakes and let it go" in response to her talking to a former colleague trying to find out what her mistakes were! :P

Smiley0884
07-12-2012, 05:34 PM
Hah. I've been at my company for more than 1.5 years, finally got an orientation after a year, and they also said they were "out" of employee handbooks and still haven't officially gotten one to me. I also have had no review and no performance goals set. And yes, there's policy behind all of that - I work with the group that administers all of it! They have time to make videos and posters about our great new competencies, but after a whole year I still have no set expectations? And yes, I've politely brought this up to my supervisor more than once. We've been around more than a 70 years and we're international. Love it.

:rofl: Obviously it varies depending on the position, but it only took me an hour to compose a performance expectation sheet for my part time job. Hopefully your supervisor finds the time eventually! Maybe they can put together a fancy video outlining performance expectations :P

I think my main gripe is even though I didn't care for the lack of orientation/set performance goals, I could actually deal with it, even if it wasn't my preference. It just strikes me as hypocritical to act smug about policies and fire an employee for "violating" them when you don't bother to inform said employee. I could understand a warning or a write up, but considering the company was always boasting about how laid back they are, they definitely were not when it come to my situation! :lol:

Debbie S
07-12-2012, 05:43 PM
Finally I find it somewhat amusing that people are telling Smiley to "learn from her mistakes and let it go" in response to her talking to a former colleague trying to find out what her mistakes were! :PIt didn't seem from her posts that Smiley is trying to "find out what her mistakes were", just that she's obsessed with what's in the employee handbook about internet usage, which doesn't make a difference at this point. I think she posted upthread that she recognizes it was wrong to rely on co-workers to tell her the Internet policy.

I don't really think the Internet usage is why Smiley was let go. I think her supervisor and CEO decided it wasn't a good fit and used the Internet as a convenient excuse. If they took her off her job responsibilities to do faxing, that seems a clear indication that they didn't think she was doing that well with what she was supposed to do.

I do agree that it was handled poorly, but that is not atypical for low-level positions, and even happens with higher-level positions. Maybe in Smiley's future interviews, she should ask what processes are in place for feedback and mentoring of new employees.

hydro
07-12-2012, 07:48 PM
I don't really think the Internet usage is why Smiley was let go. I think her supervisor and CEO decided it wasn't a good fit and used the Internet as a convenient excuse. If they took her off her job responsibilities to do faxing, that seems a clear indication that they didn't think she was doing that well with what she was supposed to do.

Well, she was doing faxing in the first week, hardly enough time for them to gauge her abilities. It's not as if the employer has clean-hands in any of this, I don't think Smiley's expectations were out of line, and can understand her confusion and need for clarity. Frankly, I find comments stating otherwise obnoxious.


I do agree that it was handled poorly, but that is not atypical for low-level positions, and even happens with higher-level positions. Maybe in Smiley's future interviews, she should ask what processes are in place for feedback and mentoring of new employees.

It's a sad state of affairs in corporate america, then. Handling anything poorly and with such disrespect towards a working professional doesn't bode well for the company. And if that's typical behavior, then we all need take a hard look at what we are willing to tolerate. Smiley isn't a slave or an indentured servant, she's a working professional that should expect professionalism even in bad situations.

Smiley0884
07-12-2012, 08:18 PM
It didn't seem from her posts that Smiley is trying to "find out what her mistakes were", just that she's obsessed with what's in the employee handbook about internet usage, which doesn't make a difference at this point. I think she posted upthread that she recognizes it was wrong to rely on co-workers to tell her the Internet policy.

I'm hardly obsessed, no need to be hyperbolic. Am I curious to know if there's anything in the handbook that relates to internet usage? Sure, but I'm not sure where you got obsessed from :confused:


I don't really think the Internet usage is why Smiley was let go. I think her supervisor and CEO decided it wasn't a good fit and used the Internet as a convenient excuse. If they took her off her job responsibilities to do faxing, that seems a clear indication that they didn't think she was doing that well with what she was supposed to do.

Feel free to ask questions, instead of make assumptions. I was shadowing my first day, came in the second day, and was told the admin team asked to have someone help them out since they had so many people on vacation. My supervisor figured it would be better to have someone new help them, so they wouldn't have to pull any marketing assistants who obviously would be more productive at that position than someone who just started. I spent the rest of the week faxing, and the middle of my next week they let me go back to my initial position. However, the admin team still periodically needed my help as they still were somewhat understaffed.


Maybe in Smiley's future interviews, she should ask what processes are in place for feedback and mentoring of new employees.

That's a good point, and something to keep in mind for interviews. I usually ask questions in regards to the position, but maybe I need to be more specific.

Smiley0884
07-12-2012, 08:27 PM
Well, she was doing faxing in the first week, hardly enough time for them to gauge her abilities. It's not as if the employer has clean-hands in any of this, I don't think Smiley's expectations were out of line, and can understand her confusion and need for clarity. Frankly, I find comments stating otherwise obnoxious.



It's a sad state of affairs in corporate america, then. Handling anything poorly and with such disrespect towards a working professional doesn't bode well for the company. And if that's typical behavior, then we all need take a hard look at what we are willing to tolerate. Smiley isn't a slave or an indentured servant, she's a working professional that should expect professionalism even in bad situations.

Thank you. Just because someone is an entry-level employee doesn't mean they don't deserve to be treated with respect and professionalism. If that makes me high-maintenance, I'd rather be that, than an over-worked, under appreciated drone. That said, I have learned a lot about asking questions, and communication.