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ArtisticFan
07-11-2012, 09:31 PM
I feel for you and hope that you have better luck with a new job.

But I have to tell you that dragging a co-worker into the situation even through private channels is asking for trouble for that person. I worked at a company for a year before leaving and taking another (better) job. The boss at the company was completely lost and found reasons to complain about everyone and everything. A co-worker of mine was fired after I left for refusing to clean out the storage room.

She called me to vent, which I allowed her to do one evening. However, she took that venting to another level. She assumed I would back her up when she filed a discrimination and wrongful termination lawsuit against the company. She claimed that she should not be asked to clean out the storage room, as it might aggravate her allergies. All well and good until I started getting phone calls on my private cell phone at work. I was using this phone until my work cell was provided. This woman's lawyer and her paralegal were calling every day wanting me to sign a statement that I knew this woman had allergies and about some of the things I had seen at the company.

My office was next to my supervisor's office and he could hear the phone calls coming in. It put me in an awkward position because now even my new boss knew that there had been trouble with my former employer. Though I never did sign a statement or agreed to testify, I was being put in a really awkward position by that former co-worker.

So my suggestion is to concentrate on the job search. It is stressful enough.

viennese
07-11-2012, 10:14 PM
I hope you'll find another job soon. Your old workplace sounds rotten.

File for unemployment! If you've worked at all in the last 6 mos you may get some benefits.

berthesghost
07-11-2012, 10:39 PM
I agree with Louis and numbers123 - dragging others into the situation is wrong. shrug... I think people are making too much out of a common practice. No way does the company have jurisdiction on people's personal email at home. It's up to the person emailed what they chose to do. He/She could simply ignore the request, or send back a reply of refusal. It's a free country and smiley isn't putting a gun to anyone's head to do anything.

Smiley0884
07-11-2012, 10:56 PM
Yeah, I was going to say Smiley is really jeopardizing her former coworkers by contacting them like this. That's the danger in some of this venting--it encourages certain actions which can only have negative outcomes.

Smiley, I realize it hurts, but please leave your coworkers aloine. You're putting them in a very vulnerable position for no good reason. This is just one of those things that you have to let go of.


This co-worker and I are actually neighbors and friends long before I started working for this company...LOL. She actually sent me a three paragraph email this morning about how it was "Bull sh*t" that I got fired, and asking me all kinds of questions about what had happened, which prompted me to ask if the Internet rule was in the handbook. Somehow I doubt she's worried about being "dragged" into anything. If it were a co-worker that I didn't have a friendship with outside of the office, I wouldn't put them in the awkward position of telling me what's in the handbook. I won't be at all offended if she chooses not to respond, or politely declines to provide that information. Although Louis did make a very good point in regards to the fact that her disclosure of the information may be illegal. Since that may be the case I won't ask her any more questions in that regard.

Smiley0884
07-11-2012, 11:15 PM
I agree with Louis and numbers123 - dragging others into the situation is wrong. It puts them in a situation that could cost them their own jobs, especially if the CEO is such a hot head. How will they find out - you're funny! Companies have the right to review sites and emails sent/received/read over their networks. If your former co-worker checks her email at work like the rest of the staff, the CEO could easily "find out." I understand that you're angry and upset, but dragging others into the fight is not fair. Or, the coworker might want to cover her own butt and forward a copy onto the CEO asking what to do. That action indicates you're thinking "lawsuit."

As stated up thread, the co-worker and I are friends outside of the workplace, and SHE contacted me asking me what had happened, via email, which I'm fairly certain she is checking on her cell phone. I'm hardly dragging anyone into anything. Friends discuss things of this nature all the time.


If the internet usage clause is the handbook, so what? That doesn't prove anything other than they were a disorganized bunch of yahoos pretending to be management and you are someone who only does what is spelled out for you. Nothing new there. The supervisor never said you COULD use the internet and you never asked her, so she can claim ignorance. The CEO can say he assumed you had been properly briefed on policy. Miscommunications and stupidity, but not grounds for a lawsuit.

:confused: When did I say it was or wasn't grounds for a law suit? I said I would be curious to know, and that's all.


The best case you can hope for is that they don't contest the unemployment claim you plan to file. Asking for corporate documents indicates that you're going to file a lawsuit, so it would be in their best interest to fight the claim. (Allowing it would be an admission of guilt.) Too bad you didn't ask for FSU opinions, because many of us would have told you not to ask, but now you've opened Pandora's box.

Mountain...meet molehill.


Frankly, I think you stop being so nit-picky, forget the handbook, file the claim and start applying for jobs instead of trying to get validation. You also need to think about how you handle yourself at work - you can't always find a job where the organization is perfect and lays everything out in black-and-white. You need to learn how to read between the lines and see in shades of grey.

Responding to my friend/former co-worker's email and asking her a question about the handbook is hardly getting in my way of searching for a job. I've already filed for unemployment, met with a recruiter this morning, and spent the rest of my day applying for jobs online.

It's fair enough if certain things aren't laid out verbatim, but I find it pretty disorganized to not even lay out performance expectations and procedures for the position itself. I don't think that's too much to ask, and I don't find it "nit picky" but that's just me. As stated earlier I am very aware of the fact that I should have asked my supervisor about internet usage instead of relying on other employees words. I'm not sure why it keeps being brought up.

Smiley0884
07-11-2012, 11:21 PM
shrug... I think people are making too much out of a common practice. No way does the company have jurisdiction on people's personal email at home. It's up to the person emailed what they chose to do. He/She could simply ignore the request, or send back a reply of refusal. It's a free country and smiley isn't putting a gun to anyone's head to do anything.

Agreed. Co-workers that have friendships outside of work constantly complain/vent to each other about work drama. I wouldn't however, want to do anything to put my friend in a position where she could get in trouble at work. We are each other's "go to" person about work related complaints, (and we used to work with each other for nearly two years at another company) so any legal issues about what's in the handbook didn't cross my mind since it's so normal for us.

agalisgv
07-11-2012, 11:35 PM
This co-worker and I are actually neighbors and friends long before I started working for this company...LOL. Ah, okay. I thought this was someone you only knew through working there, and saw this as a potentially sticky situation.

Good luck with the job search :)

Smiley0884
07-11-2012, 11:46 PM
Ah, okay. I thought this was someone you only knew through working there, and saw this as a potentially sticky situation.

Good luck with the job search :)


Thank you!! :)

FigureSpins
07-12-2012, 12:12 AM
This co-worker and I are actually neighbors and friends long before I started working for this company...LOL.
That's a horse of a different color. I would have called that person a "friend who lives near me and works there." Nice to have someone sympathetic in real life. Good luck.

numbers123
07-12-2012, 03:23 AM
Heh, IBS doesn't really work that way...sometimes I can feel it coming, and other times I think I'm just going for a quick 5min bathroom trip...and it turns into a 40 min bathroom trip....:scream: I informed her of my situation, without being TMI, and she was very understanding about it.

Wait - did you take a 40 minute bathroom break during your employment? Where you were sitting across from the CEO's office? and you had some less than expected phone contacts?

Even if your co-worker is a neighbor and a good friend, a written email could potentially come back to bite her. If it was a face to face communication with no witnesses or people who could overhear, that might be different.

I like agal, wish you good luck in your job search

berthesghost
07-12-2012, 03:39 AM
Wait - did you take a 40 minute bathroom break during your employment? Where you were sitting across from the CEO's office? and you had some less than expected phone contacts?

Even if your co-worker is a neighbor and a good friend, a written email could potentially come back to bite her. If it was a face to face communication with no witnesses or people who could overhear, that might be different.

I like agal, wish you good luck in your job searchSeriously, where exactly do you think you're going this this? :rolleyes:

Smiley0884
07-12-2012, 04:03 AM
Wait - did you take a 40 minute bathroom break during your employment? Where you were sitting across from the CEO's office? and you had some less than expected phone contacts?




No, it wasn't 40 mins. I was just giving an example of how the effects of IBS are not always "consistent" :P

Debbie S
07-12-2012, 04:52 AM
No, it wasn't 40 mins. I was just giving an example of how the effects of IBS are not always "consistent" :PMy advice is to stop talking about IBS (or any other medical conditions) to your employers. As FigureSpins stated, employers don't want to hear about employees' personal problems, particularly if they've only been there 3 weeks, particularly if it involves trips to the bathroom.

You are never going to know what exactly happened, and you really don't need to know. I'll repeat what others have said, move on. You may have been fired for internet usage, you may have been fired for poor performance, or your boss may have thought you'd be high maintenance with talk of health problems. Focus on what you have learned from the experience and move forward. And don't let your bitterness about the job affect your friendship with your now-former co-worker.

From what you have posted, it sounds like you did cold calls/telemarketing for clients who hired your employer to contact potential customers and get them interested. Jobs like yours have a high rate of turnover for a reason. For one, people don't like working them, so they leave after short periods of time. Another reason is that there isn't a high level of skill required and there are tons of 'qualified' people out there looking for work who can fill the job. Hiring costs are generally low. So usually, an employer will find it cheaper to just get rid of an employee they don't think will work out (for whatever reason, and as people here have already said, they don't need one) rather than give them second chances or additional training.

Usually companies don't give formal training to new employees. You need to get used to picking things up as you go along, asking questions when necessary. Many times, you won't get specific performance expectations, and even if you do, they'll change constantly.

Smiley0884
07-12-2012, 06:36 AM
My advice is to stop talking about IBS (or any other medical conditions) to your employers. As FigureSpins stated, employers don't want to hear about employees' personal problems, particularly if they've only been there 3 weeks, particularly if it involves trips to the bathroom.

Um, the example I gave was to another poster, not to my supervisor :P I have a health condition, I'm going to be honest about it, and present a doctors note, if needed. As stated earlier, I informed my supervisor of my condition, without giving too many details, and she was understanding. If something came up down the road where my condition affected my work performance/attendance, I'm sure they would rather I be upfront about it.


You are never going to know what exactly happened, and you really don't need to know. I'll repeat what others have said, move on.

Thanks for the advice, however I think I've stated quite a few times that I am moving on. Like stated up thread, everyone moves on in different ways and different times. I've gone to a recruiter, I've filed for unemployment, and I asked my boss at my part time job if I can pick up more shifts. I think I'm good.


And don't let your bitterness about the job affect your friendship with your now-former co-worker.

:shuffle: Yeah I'll be sure not to let my "bitterness" affect my friendship with my former co-worker...That's a pretty big assumption, and not at all the truth. Still a bit miffed? Sure, but that's not in the same league as bitter.


From what you have posted, it sounds like you did cold calls/telemarketing for clients who hired your employer to contact potential customers and get them interested.

There was no cold calling. We did business to business appointment setting via email and phone. Our company already had relationships with the businesses we were calling. We basically laid the ground work for the higher-ups in the marketing department.




Usually companies don't give formal training to new employees. You need to get used to picking things up as you go along, asking questions when necessary. Many times, you won't get specific performance expectations, and even if you do, they'll change constantly.

:confused: I'm not sure where you are getting that assumption from. Although maybe I'm using the wrong word and should have said "orientation" as opposed to "training". I temped for a while out of college, and also have a lot of friends that work in marketing/sales that were equally aghast that we didn't receive any formal orientation. I won't say most since that's too large an assumption to make, but based on what I know, many companies at least have an HR orientation or some sort of training on their company software, (Phoenix, Marketo, Salesforce, ect.) I did catch on pretty quickly regardless, but that doesn't change my opinion that the company would be better off at least providing new hires with an employee handbook, and a sheet or small packet outlining basic performance duties/standards, ect.

maatTheViking
07-12-2012, 09:55 AM
I would always expect new employee orientation, even if it is just 30 min of introduction to the HR person, your office and the papers to sign. And a chance to ask questions about the policies.

It sounds like the company was not a good fit for you, good luck on the job search.