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immoimeme
07-09-2012, 06:23 PM
If I live to be 100, I will never, EVER understand folks who bitch and whine about second-hand cigarette smoke yet drive and drive and fricking DRIVE hulking steel vehicles that spew out far more toxic, more damaging fumes.

I'll never understand folks who BBQ with tons of fricking lighter fluid then complain because you lit a cig to like, sort of dull the odor of that nasty cr*p.

I'll never understand folks who don't want their kid breathing second hand smoke yet stuff that kid full of far worse stuff called "fast food" and "cola."

Leave me and my cigs the hell alone and I won't mess with whatever it is that drives me nuts but makes you hap hap happy, 'kay?

Southpaw
07-09-2012, 06:43 PM
I'll never understand people who drink liqueur while smoking (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9AnvARnv60).

Anita18
07-09-2012, 07:24 PM
Congrats to all of you who are quitting and trying to quit smoking! Big hugs and pats on the back!

Here is another potential angle to the whole issue:

Looking back on life from the advantage of 62 years, I have come to the realization that living a pristine lifestyle and doing all the right things doesn't necessarily mean you won't die at 35 from cancer, a heart attack, etc.

Don't get me wrong-trying to be healthy is wonderful, and yes, doing the right things might mean you only have a small heart attack instead of one that kills you. However, if your DNA says you're going to have a particular disease, eating organic food isn't going to save you.

I think that the objective to trying to live healthy lifestyles isn't so you'll have years added to your life. It's about the quality of your life day by day. If you exercise, you're going to feel better on a daily basis.

I'm a huge control freak, and I see so clearly that doing all these things to ward of the reaper or just the pounds is part of a control thing. We can't control life much at all, really. We're all going to get sick and die eventually. We have absolutely no control over that.

But-we can control how we feel on a day to day basis. Simplistic, I know.
Oh I agree. If you're predispositioned to cancer, that won't change whether you smoke or not. My coworker is fighting pancreatic cancer, and he's not a smoker, not overweight (quite the opposite!), doesn't have diabetes, no family history. Just plain bad luck.

I don't think organic food is the panacea for lifelong good health either, unless you're particularly allergic to pesticides. But locally grown food (that can be organic) just tastes better. So that goes into your point of enjoying life day to day. :)

michiruwater
07-09-2012, 07:58 PM
According to the CDC, smoking cause about 90% of lung cancers (http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm). So, no, I do not agree with you that if you are predisposed to lung cancer, whether or not you smoke won't make a difference. Clearly, it makes an absolutely gigantic difference.

skatingfan5
07-09-2012, 08:27 PM
According to the CDC, smoking cause about 90% of lung cancers (http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm). So, no, I do not agree with you that if you are predisposed to lung cancer, whether or not you smoke won't make a difference. Clearly, it makes an absolutely gigantic difference.Yes, it does make a big difference, but obviously not enough to prevent people from starting the smoking habit. If 90% of people who smoked developed lung cancer, it probably would have a huge deterrent effect -- and yet there still probably would be people taking up smoking. :(

My father smoked for over 30 years -- began when he was in his early 20's and serving in the Merchant Marine during WWII. I remember him trying to quit several times -- and once did for a year, only to take it up again. It wasn't until he found himself at the Mayo Clinic for surgery for possible lung cancer (a shadow on his chest x-ray in those pre-CAT scan days) that he successfully quit -- cold turkey -- and never smoked another day of his life. He didn't have lung cancer, but his hospital roommate and the two men in the room across the hall weren't so fortunate. Dad hated that he was hooked on cigarettes and offered my siblings and me $500 each (a goodly amount back then) if we made it to age 21 w/out smoking. The incentive was partially successful at least. I smoked for one year in my early 20's (stupidly to avoid "smelling the smoke" of my chain-smoking roommate and co-workers), but was never hooked on it at all and quit without any problem. One of my sisters started at age 18, quit when she was pregnant with my nephew, started up again 5 years later, and then finally quit after another 5 years.

Congrats to all who have decided to stop smoking and have won that difficult battle. :respec:

Bev Johnston
07-09-2012, 08:28 PM
serious question - how do people get addicted to something that tastes and smells like hot sewage?

Yes,that is a great question and some of us who are ex-smokers don't even understand it.

I never thought I'd be a smoker, and then sophomore year of college rolled around and life got tough. A lot of my friends didn't come back after freshman year, I had a job as a resident advisor, and my classes were a lot harder. I went to a party one night and decided to try a Marlboro Red. I wound up laying on a bed with my face in a trashcan, because smoking it gave me the spins in the worst way and upset my stomach terribly. Logically, this should've put me off smoking, right?

One of my friends suggested that I try something lighter and with a little menthol, so I started smoking Salem Slim Lights. The menthol taste covered up the nasty tobacco/poison taste, and I got a nice little buzz. They were great for relieving my stress and it was an awful lot of fun to sit with my friends and smoke and talk. If I think about it now, I think I was mostly addicted to the ritual of it all. I never thought I would always smoke and didn't consider myself a hard core smoker, but there was something comforting about the process of smoking.

I managed to sort of quit after college, but I'd have periods when I'd go back to smoking again. Finally in 2000, I went out for dinner with my boyfriend to a restaurant where he knew everyone who worked there. After the restaurant closed, we sat around drinking and smoking with the staff. I got pretty smashed and was violently ill the next day. The thing that grossed me out the most about the previous night was the number of cigarettes I'd smoked. I could just envision black, rancid smoke coming out of my lungs and mouth. For some reason, that visualization was what it took for me to quit for good.

I haven't smoked for over 12 years and I am highly disgusted by it now. I wouldn't even consider getting serious with someone who smokes. It's just a real deal breaker for me. I don't have many friends who smoke, but there are a few. Luckily, they don't smoke in their homes and they take themselves far away from everyone else if we are all out together.

Louis
07-09-2012, 08:51 PM
I'm into my sixth week of a drastic reduction smoking reduction program, down from two packs a day at worst to six a day at best.

:respec: Good for you! I know from your past posts how much you love smoking. It's encouraging that you're giving it a try.


I enjoy smoking. It is a five minute break where I can stop and think and plan.

Try meditation! :P


Yes, it does make a big difference, but obviously not enough to prevent people from starting the smoking habit. If 90% of people who smoked developed lung cancer, it probably would have a huge deterrent effect -- and yet there still probably would be people taking up smoking. :(

Won't all smokers get lung cancer if they live long enough? My understanding, and correct me if I'm wrong, is that lung cancer is 100% guaranteed for smokers. Some get "lucky" and die of something else before their lung cancer develops.

I cut some slack to smokers in their 50s and up, but none to people my age. My sister got a ticket for throwing a cigarette butt out the window of a car. I applaud the cop who gave her the ticket, not so much because she littered, but because she had three kids, including a FIVE-DAY-OLD BABY plus two other severely asthmatic children (gee, I wonder why....) in the car while she and her boyfriend were both puffing away. IMO, that should be a jailable offense or at the very least carry a four- or five-figure fine.

Anita18
07-09-2012, 08:57 PM
According to the CDC, smoking cause about 90% of lung cancers (http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm). So, no, I do not agree with you that if you are predisposed to lung cancer, whether or not you smoke won't make a difference. Clearly, it makes an absolutely gigantic difference.
But there are people who have lung cancer who've never smoked a day in their life. (Sure, there's secondhand smoke too, but it's still possible to have it develop completely out of the blue.) That's what I mean. Smoking drastically, DRASTICALLY cuts the chances of developing lung cancer, but nothing is ever 100% guaranteed.


Won't all smokers get lung cancer if they live long enough? My understanding, and correct me if I'm wrong, is that lung cancer is 100% guaranteed for smokers. Some get "lucky" and die of something else before their lung cancer develops.
Judging by how smoker's lungs look, I would be surprised! :yikes: It's really just a matter of time, IMO. Roll the die whether it'll hit in your 50s or in your 90s.

PRlady
07-09-2012, 08:58 PM
Won't all smokers get lung cancer if they live long enough? My understanding, and correct me if I'm wrong, is that lung cancer is 100% guaranteed for smokers. Some get "lucky" and die of something else before their lung cancer develops.

I cut some slack to smokers in their 50s and up, but none to people my age. My sister got a ticket for throwing a cigarette butt out the window of a car. I applaud the cop who gave her the ticket, not so much because she littered, but because she had three kids, including a FIVE-DAY-OLD BABY plus two other severely asthmatic children (gee, I wonder why....) in the car while she and her boyfriend were both puffing away. IMO, that should be a jailable offense or at the very least carry a four- or five-figure fine.

Well, thank you, Louis for the exemption. ;) (I've avoided this thread for as long as I could.) And no, lung cancer is not 100% guaranteed, my 95-year-old aunt died of something else after a lifetime of more than a pack a day, my 89-year-old aunt looks to be going the same way. I guess if people lived to be 150 your theory might be accurate.

I cross the street to avoid strollers if I'm smoking, that's how paranoid I've gotten about babies and second-hand smoke.

And yes, it is hellish to quit especially if there are psychological factors to smoking, which for many people there are. It's the same with obesity, I imagine, with alcoholism and illegal drug use, prescription drug addiction and so on. The underlying causes are not identical with the actual substance being abused, but after time they fuse into a very difficult problem.

nubka
07-09-2012, 09:43 PM
Congrats to all of you who are quitting and trying to quit smoking! Big hugs and pats on the back!

Here is another potential angle to the whole issue:

Looking back on life from the advantage of 62 years, I have come to the realization that living a pristine lifestyle and doing all the right things doesn't necessarily mean you won't die at 35 from cancer, a heart attack, etc.

Don't get me wrong-trying to be healthy is wonderful, and yes, doing the right things might mean you only have a small heart attack instead of one that kills you. However, if your DNA says you're going to have a particular disease, eating organic food isn't going to save you.

I think that the objective to trying to live healthy lifestyles isn't so you'll have years added to your life. It's about the quality of your life day by day. If you exercise, you're going to feel better on a daily basis.

I'm a huge control freak, and I see so clearly that doing all these things to ward of the reaper or just the pounds is part of a control thing. We can't control life much at all, really. We're all going to get sick and die eventually. We have absolutely no control over that.

But-we can control how we feel on a day to day basis. Simplistic, I know.

So do you smoke, or not? Just curious. :)

nubka
07-09-2012, 09:48 PM
If I live to be 100, I will never, EVER understand folks who bitch and whine about second-hand cigarette smoke yet drive and drive and fricking DRIVE hulking steel vehicles that spew out far more toxic, more damaging fumes.

I'll never understand folks who BBQ with tons of fricking lighter fluid then complain because you lit a cig to like, sort of dull the odor of that nasty cr*p.

I'll never understand folks who don't want their kid breathing second hand smoke yet stuff that kid full of far worse stuff called "fast food" and "cola."

Leave me and my cigs the hell alone and I won't mess with whatever it is that drives me nuts but makes you hap hap happy, 'kay?

You are right, french fries and cola are waaaay worse than cigarette smoke. :rolleyes:

skatingfan5
07-09-2012, 09:53 PM
So do you smoke, or not? Just curious. :)In post #31 up thread Holley Calmes said that she had smoked from age 18 to 26 (more than 35 years ago).

Lacey
07-09-2012, 10:02 PM
One thing I am proud of is that not one of my 3 adult kids smoke, one did until she got married, I kind of wish I had known that I must have been embarrassing them, I might have stopped sooner. Well, I am a good quitter, been 5 years and not one thought.

BlueRidge
07-09-2012, 10:15 PM
You are right, french fries and cola are waaaay worse than cigarette smoke. :rolleyes:

They actually are really bad for you however.

I think its a valid question why are people willing to eat a large amount of foods that contain things that are bad for your health and have few nutrients. No one has to smoke anything, but everyone has to eat, but why do we (pretty much we've all done it) go around eating things that are very likely to cause us illness?

I think this everytime I go by a fast food place. Lung cancer is horrid, emphysema is horrid, but heart attacks and strokes aren't pleasant experiences either.

snoopy
07-09-2012, 10:29 PM
I would imagine that the less direct the cause and effect are, the more likely we are to engage in high risk behaviors whether that is bad eating or smoking. It takes a few years of both to start noticing the ill effects.

However, when Japanfan mentioned addictions earlier, the one I thought of was Crocodile. This is a form of meth that has a time frame of killing users of two years. And it turns your skin (and your internal organs) a hard scaly green along the way. Which is why they call it Crocodile. So there is a direct and short killing effect of the drug but people cannot get off of it once they are hooked. When I read about this particular drug, this is what really hit home the power of addictions, whatever they may be.