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my little pony
07-08-2012, 05:58 PM
serious question - how do people get addicted to something that tastes and smells like hot sewage?

Lara
07-08-2012, 06:15 PM
My stupid sister started smoking when she was 15. She's 21 now. It blows my mind that in this age, when we have so much concrete information that smoking will kill you, when she's a smart girl, that she still decided to smoke and eventually became addicted to it. Our grandmother died three days after Christmas in 2010 of severe lung cancer that ate her whole body up. She'd smoked her whole life. She was 67. She was the only grandparent I ever had.

My brother's even more frustrating - he started after his teens. :wall: So. effing. stupid.

I live out of town (for now) and see him rarely enough that I can try to forget about it, but it does kill me to think about. It was the one thing I had always hoped he wouldn't do, and I thought he'd be safe by then. :(

taf2002
07-08-2012, 06:32 PM
serious question - how do people get addicted to something that tastes and smells like hot sewage?

As a small child I loved the smell of cigarette smoke. I loved my 1st cigarette. Non-coffee drinkers say the same thing about coffee - how can people drink something so vile? I say the same about beer. I never got a taste for it.

It's been 3 1/2 yrs since I quit. I don't crave one very often & it's pretty easy now to ignore the desire. But as soon as I saw the title to this thread I really wanted one. BTW, people often said I was a polite smoker. Not every smoker is rude.

Holley Calmes
07-08-2012, 06:41 PM
Many smokers try extremely hard not to offend. I do have to say, however, that the smoke carries with them. They go outside for a ciggie, and when they come back in, they reek of it. They can't tell this themselves, but it's obvious they've been smoking. You can smell them from yards and yards away. Or if they smoke outside, it's supposed to be "ok" because it's...well, outside. Believe me, if you are anywhere close to an outside smoker, you are breathing in the smoke which you can smell very strongly. Their cars stink. We had a neighbor with a lovely mountain house in our neighborhood. This guy and his wife (now dead) were chronic smokers. They were lovely people, and I liked them a lot. They would invite us over for dinner, but after a few times, we declined because their house was so permeated with smoke, we couldn't breathe, and our stomachs would be upset when we left. of course, we didn't tell them that. We'd have to make up an excuse, which isn't comfortable to do. We'd invite them to our house, but they wouldn't come because they knew we didn't want them to smoke in the house.

Southpaw
07-08-2012, 07:13 PM
My stupid sister started smoking when she was 15. She's 21 now. It blows my mind that in this age, when we have so much concrete information that smoking will kill you, when she's a smart girl, that she still decided to smoke and eventually became addicted to it. Our grandmother died three days after Christmas in 2010 of severe lung cancer that ate her whole body up. She'd smoked her whole life. She was 67. She was the only grandparent I ever had.

When my heavy smoker father was tethered to the oxygen tank my mother used to go outside to smoke because, ya know, couldn't have open flames near oxygen. It astounded me that her husband was lying inside, chained to his couch and miserable for it, he couldn't walk to the kitchen without gasping for air, and yet she kept on with it even though the awful truth was staring her right in the face. Ironically, smoking was a coping mechanism for her. Shortly after he died she finally quit, which was MY tipoff that something was wrong with her because she was such an aggressive smoker the whole time I knew her (and then some), but by then it was too late because she died from lung cancer a year later. That's just how these things go sometimes. People see what they want to see and think what they want to think and they make their decisions accordingly.

Really
07-08-2012, 07:31 PM
I smoked from the age of 15 to 42. Quitting was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. My mother was never able to quit. Some people have those extremely addictive personalities that make it almost impossible. Ever notice that a large number of drug addicts are also smokers? Most of the time I really enjoyed smoking -- after I got over turning green when I first started. But like many who started in the 70's, I did it to fit in. However the getting over the fitting in was extremely difficult.

My son smokes -- I didn't realize it until after I'd quit and could smell it on him. I bug him about it occasionally, but like all the rest of us, he'll quit when he's ready.

ChelleC
07-08-2012, 08:03 PM
I'm the first one in my family who doesn't smoke. I've always hated the smell of cigarette smoke. I can remember being around 4-6 years old, and using my hand to move my grandmother's cigarette smoke away from me. Her response. "That won't hurt you." :(

My grandmother died of lung cancer that had metasized to her bones in 2010. However, she'd quit smoking 20 years before the diagnosis. Her doctor had informed her it would best for her to stop, due to heart disease. She quit cold turkey on that day. When my grandfather came home, she told him. She told him if he wanted to keep smoking that was fine, but he quit at the same time. I think the both smoked around a carton a week, and at the time they quit, there was an unopened carton in their cabinet. They'd always bought the cigarettes at a small store near their home. The guy who owned the store let them return the cigarettes. The only time I remember my grandmother saying anything about wanting a cigarette was about six months after she'd quit, and her brother died. His wife was smoking at the funeral home, and she said she thought of how easy it would be to reach over and get one of her sister-in-law's cigarettes.

My mother has smoked since she was 14, she will turn 64 at the end of this month so 50 years. :( She's quit for a few months a couple of times, but started back. After my grandparents quit smoking, they wouldn't let anyone smoke in the house, but they could go outside to smoke. When we would visit my grandparents for the weekend, my mom would go the entire weekend without smoking, but as soon as we were out of sight of their house, she would reach into the backseat for her cigarettes.

I do not comprehend at all how my mom can still be smoking after watching her mother die of lung cancer. :(

I'm fairly certain my future will include watching my mother die of it too.

snoopysnake
07-08-2012, 08:14 PM
My grandmother smoked from high school until her late 40's and quit and has not smoked again. She said for the past 42 years every single day she wants - a huge desire - a cigarette. I think it's more than will power.

She was healthy as a smoker and she is healthy as a non smoker. At 82 she is very active.

If she kept smoking there's a good chance that today she'd either be not healthy, or already dead.

My mother was a heavy smoker (and was in denial that her 2nd hand smoke was harmful to me. I have never smoked but attribute my chronic cough to her smoke.) She was adamant that "you've gotta die of something sometime" and that no one should bug a smoker to quit, until she got lung cancer. Then she actually begged her sister to quit. (She didn't and died of a stroke 7 years after Mom died of lung cancer.)

made_in_canada
07-08-2012, 08:25 PM
I've never understood the appeal of smoking at all. I do understand though that it isn't an easy thing to quit and have a lot of sympathy for those that are addicted.

I'm very grateful for the strict non-smoking laws where I live. There's no smoking allowed in any public building including patios and entrances. I think it probably makes smoking less appealing to start too if you aren't allowed to smoke in public.

Southpaw
07-08-2012, 08:29 PM
My mother was a heavy smoker (and was in denial that her 2nd hand smoke was harmful to me. I have never smoked but attribute my chronic cough to her smoke.)

Oh yeah, I got that "it's not hurting you" trip from my parents, too. It's funny because even though I've never smoked in my life (not firsthand, anyway) smokers always wrongly peg me as one of their own. I guess I have a smoker's personality, but instead I choose to channel that inherent smoker energy into other hobbies and pursuits. People often wrongly peg me as someone who would get drunk and start dancing on tables with a lampshade on my head, too. I guess because I like to joke around and have a good time with people that they automatically assume I'm some girl gone wild. But really, I grew up in a house in which I was always choking on smoke so I've had enough of that in my life. I'm not insane about it and I'll even chat with people outside while they're smoking, but I don't ever EVER want to live with a smoker again.

Anita18
07-08-2012, 09:11 PM
I'm a nonsmoker and am pretty lucky that all my friends are nonsmokers too. I've never had to deal with the awkward talks of smoke smell on clothes or having to smoke outside or whatever. In fact, I think the only people I can recall interacting with who were regular smokers were my photography teachers this past semester. :lol: I think they took the smoke breaks as general breaks to get away from the craziness of the lab.

I understand that quitting is hard. Not only is it chemically addicting, but physically addicting too. It's a coping mechanism.

What I don't really understand is why so many people start nowadays, when smoking laws are getting stricter, cigarettes are expensive, AND everyone knows smoking drastically increases your chances of developing cancer.

purple skates
07-08-2012, 10:04 PM
serious question - how do people get addicted to something that tastes and smells like hot sewage?

There's a buzz at first, if I remember correctly from all that time ago. After I got over wanting to vomit, that is. When I started, all my friends smoked so I did too. Cowboy Killers (Marlboros). Switched to Virginia Slims Light Menthol after a few years - the menthol is addictive too. Although I quit smoking, I always have a can of Altoids in my car and eat them when I'm driving. I think it's a leftover from the menthol cigs.


I do not comprehend at all how my mom can still be smoking after watching her mother die of lung cancer. :(

My husband watched his mother die from lung cancer. She died at home, under the care of DH and his two nurse sisters. From what he said, it wasn't pretty. Yet he still smokes.


I'm fairly certain my future will include watching my mother die of it too.

I expect to be in this position with my husband. :(

merrywidow
07-08-2012, 10:59 PM
I smoked for 50 years & quit 9 years ago at age 68, cold turkey. Why then? Because I had a full blown heart attack. Did I have trouble quitting? Oh, no. Do I ever long for a cigarette? Nope. It doesn't even bother me to be around a smoker. I do think your genes determine how smoking will affect you. My mother was not a smoker & died of a heart attack at age 56. My father smoked into his 80's & died of heart failure at the age of 93. Both of my brothers smoked. One had had a bad heart from his 50's requiring at least 3 open heart surgeries so had stopped smoking then. He died last year at age 81. My other brother will soon turn 84 & I believe he smokes cigars now instead of cigarettes. I should note that I never smoked more than 1 pack a day & when I would reach that amount I would cut back to 3 cigarettes per day for a few days & then slowly smoke more. For the last 20 years that I smoked it was 12 to 15 cigarettes a day.
One thing more I'd like to say...when I had my heart attack the pain was not in my chest or arm but in both of my elbows. Please be aware that the pain can strike anywhere.

Aussie Willy
07-08-2012, 11:14 PM
The issue with smoking and people being lectured and other things (like not exercising or eating crap) is that smoking directly affects others around them, that is probably why smokers probably cop it more than others. I personally hate having to walk through a cloud of cigarette smoke to get into the office building or have someone blow smoke in my face if I walking down the street. I tend to hold my breath or keep a wide berth. Sorry but if you stand outside our office door sucking on a fag, then I am going to tell you go elsewhere to do it, as we do have an exclusion zone around our office for smokers (you cannot smoke within 20 metres of an entrance).

Japanfan
07-08-2012, 11:20 PM
Every day I pray that they will pass a law in Louisiana to not allow smoking in public places. They no longer allow it in restaurants but casinos and bars still allow smoking. We go to the casino and about die sometimes with someone sitting next to us blowing smoke in our face. It is so incredibly rude. If you want to kill yourself with that crap, fine, go do it at home. I should not be forced to breath your poison. We often decide not to go to the casino because of the smoke so they do lose business from us and others we know because of allowing smoking (although probably not as much business as they would lose if they banned smoking). We almost never go to bars because of smoking as the smoke in a bar is much worse than in a casino which is much more open.

Are there any states other than Louisiana where smoking is still allowed in public places? It's banned in all the states I've been to (Northwest Coast states, Arizona) and I've assumed that would be the case everywhere else. Perhaps the deep south is an exception?

In Nevada smoking is allowed in casinos, though not in regular bars so far as I know. The reason for this is that brings in a ton of money as many smokers are drinkers and gamblers as well. Californians flock to the Nevada casinos on the week-end to smoke and drink.