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Japanfan
07-16-2012, 01:12 AM
Do you oppose that?

My resistance to it was broken down many years ago and since I've cut back, not an issue.

However, smoking is legal. And it's probably not going to be illegal until there is no money to be made from it. In Canada the taxes on smokes are huge and the government wants that money. And, the fact that is legal indicates that people should be able to do it somewhere. As more and more public spaces are going smoke free, that somewhere has become private property. Public spaces where smoking is allowed are becoming more isolated - like corners of airport grounds where people aren't passing by.

Do you really think that second-hand smoke is a major health threat at this point in time in places that have stringent non-smoking policies? What your friend did in your car was just rude and disrespectful.

But again, I do think the attention put on the harm of smoking is disproportionate to other harms and that more should be done to make people aware of other harms. Again, this comes to money. Big Pharma had lots of money to make when Big Tobacco was taken to task, and still makes big money off of ex-smokers with NRTs and various medications.

But to take a fast food joint like McDonalds or food producer that puts harmful ingredients in processed food products in a manner that led people to drastically reduce their fast food consumption would be highly difficult to do because of the various interests that need protecting.

How would you feel if you were buying your child a soda with fructose and someone gave you a look of horror and a lecture?



If that is what it takes to bring down smoking rates, would you not support that? And if not, why not? To me, that is the crux of the issue.

It is bringing down smoking rates, at least in some parts of the world. I don't think you'll find many smokers complaining about that, especially those who want to quit or at least cut back.

And what do you think about making smoking a substance available by prescription only (for designated addicts), as I believe was tried in Iceland? Could be wrong about that?

agalisgv
07-16-2012, 01:54 AM
I think second-hand smoke is less an issue *because* of all the laws restricting public smoking. IOW, the more laws that are passed restricting smoking, the less second-hand smoke is an issue. The response to that can't be, though, let's get rid of restrictions on smoking bc once you do, second-hand smoke becomes a much larger issue again.

Wrt being lectured on pop, 1) we're not big pop drinkers, and 2) I'm a parent, so I'm used to being lectured on everything under the sun :).

And just want to say I admire and respect your efforts at cutting back. I know it isn't easy, so many kudos to you for trying!

Idk anything about Iceland and cig availability. My initial reaction is to go the present route of tax and public restriction rather than available by prescription only. Would also say that I don't support restrictions on tobacco as a whole as that is used frequently for ceremonial purposes, abd thus should be readily available IMO.

Holley Calmes
07-16-2012, 02:02 AM
Cigs aren't smoked for religious reasons in Native communities (though tobacco is used frequently). Native guys say that sometimes to make their tobacco habit seem better than it is, but also as a line to come onto non-Indian women (sorry).

The dude who attacked you was a misogynist skirt-chaser who used his race/ethnicity to score. Nothing religious or traditional about it (and I'm sorry it happened to you). Sadly, he's not unique, and I have only contempt for such folk.

Dude who smoked in my car was just being an ass (he broke my car radio too and was drinking while driving--car smelled of beer as well). Sometimes it is what it is unfortunately.

I know....you're right. I survived-no permanent scars. Con artists come in all colors and ethnicities.

purple skates
07-16-2012, 05:35 PM
Fair enough. I think a big issue is that, while smoking is banned in many places, it is not illegal. Yet, when smokers light up in a place where it is not banned, they are often made to feel like scum.

<snip>

But smokers are usually expected to "go away," even if they are within their rights to light up in a given area.

I think it depends on where they are smoking. In front of a building is problematic (although in some areas they are banned from doing so now) because people have to walk through a cloud of smoke to get inside. It is amazing how smoke from even a casual contact like that will stick to a person's hair. :(

However, there's lots of "designated" smoking areas I've seen that are out of the common paths of people that are just fine, IMO, and people who don't smoke shouldn't be there in the first place to complain about it (if that makes any sense).


I don't oppose cigarette taxes. Nor do I oppose efforts to prevent others from smoking.

I think cigarette taxes should be used solely for the education and treatment of smoking-related diseases, as well as cancer research. I don't think they should be used for general government funding, but unfortunately they are.


Do you honestly think smokers are unaware of those issues?

There are many who are aware but don't give a damn.


If you take your child to a park where smoking is allowed and a person is sitting on a park bench, is that smoker a danger to your health? If smoking is allowed in the park - and it is a legal habit, remember - is the mere presence of that smoker a danger to your child's health?

I do want to make a point here. If I am at a park with my child and someone is smoking on a bench, then I think it is my responsibility to take my child elsewhere because that person does have the right to smoke. However, if my child and I were there first, I would be very offended if a person sits down and lights up next to me.


But I'll add - do you think that third-hand smoke is a danger to your health?

There have been times when my asthma has been triggered by someone reeking strongly of smoke (as it also does with some strong perfumes, and pretty much any type of recently-applied hair spray). There's a contractor that sometimes comes in the office who smells so bad - from way across the room - that I am amazed that the people who have to deal with him in a one-on-one basis can manage it. Any time I get close to him my lungs react.

DAngel
07-16-2012, 10:44 PM
How would you feel if you were buying your child a soda with fructose and someone gave you a look of horror and a lecture?

I don't have a child and I seldom buy soda, but I would point out to them that whole fruits, too, contain fructose.

And maybe point them to websites like this one (http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/frequently-asked-questions/fructose).

Simone411
07-23-2012, 02:25 PM
I was admitted into the hospital on April of 2011. I had Necrotizing Fasciitis. I nearly died and almost lost my leg. While in recovery (ICU), one of my doctors asked me if I smoked. I told the doctor that I did and that I had smoked since I was 24 years old.

The doctor looked sort of surprised, and asked me how many packs of cigarettes did I smoke per day. I told him that it usually takes me around 3 1/2 days to smoke a pack. The doctor then said that according to x rays and other tests that my lungs looked clear. He said I had non-smokers lungs.

Needless to say, that surprised the heck out of me. I realized, however, after finding that out that I didn't want to end up having smokers lungs in the future.

A friend from the nursing facility I was staying at during the time told me about a vapor cigarette called "Smoke Assist". She showed me hers, and told me that she no longer coughed and her allergies were a lot better since she started using it. She said that she had chosen the tobacco flavored cigarette with nicotine. It came with 10 refill cartridges and a usb plug to recharge it with. Each cartridge was equivalent to 150 cigarettes. She said the best thing about it was that you no longer inhaled the smoke, tar, and other chemicals that were contained in a cigarette. The only thing you exhaled was water vapor.

Shortly after that, I ordered Smoke Assist online from Carol Wright, and I've used it ever since. I ordered the menthol cigarette with nicotine, and to me, it's just like smoking a cigarette except there's no more smelly smoke going into the lungs, chemicals or tar. With 10 refill cartridges included, that should last me a lifetime. :lol: There's a wall or car adapter that you can order, too.

Smoke Assist (http://www.carolwrightgifts.com/Personal-Care/Health-Products/Smoke-Assist/76103.cfm?clickSource=SEARCH)

berthesghost
07-23-2012, 06:03 PM
I'm a parent, so I'm used to being lectured on everything under the sun :).:lol: ain't that the truth!

nothing in Japanfan's post seem to reflect the reality of life in 2012. Where is this magical place where the only big business criticized is the tobacco industry, where obesity is ignored as a health crisis, where zoning doesn't dictate where we can do what and when, but only smoking is unfairly affected, and governments happily spend billions on smoking related heath issues just so they can make a few extra bucks on cigarette taxes. :lol:

FarFarAway
07-24-2012, 07:09 AM
I do want to make a point here. If I am at a park with my child and someone is smoking on a bench, then I think it is my responsibility to take my child elsewhere because that person does have the right to smoke. However, if my child and I were there first, I would be very offended if a person sits down and lights up next to me.

That's an interesting point of view I should say, I have never heard anyone to express it :)

Actually, I have quite a considerable smoking history. I started smoking at the age of 13, that was back in 1992, I think, when my parents divorced. Cigarettes were easily bought then, provided you had the money (remember, Russia became open just a year before that:) ). I actually never thought of giving up till nowadays, but I always had some rules for me:

- I never smoked in the elevators/on the stairs in the blockflats
- never smoked in parks or some areas like that, because there are children there and smoke isn't doing any good for them
- I do smoke in the public buildings, but only in those which have some special closed areas designed for that
- Even though smoking in streets is allowed here, I try not to do so, since I realize that other people may not like the smell. If I smoke in the streets I stop and choose the place, where there are no people.

It is strange, though, that despite the fact that I smoke (half a year ago that was a pack in a day or in a day and a half, now I'm giving up gradually, so that means a pack for 3-3.5 days), I hate the smell of the smoke that is coming from other people's cigarettes:D I don't know why.

And all the advertising against smoking, which we have here on TV and in the press doesn't affect me in fact. My decision to give up was actually caused by me realizing that I probably had enough of cigarettes. And I don't like my teeth becoming yellow:(

Japanfan
07-24-2012, 07:33 AM
nothing in Japanfan's post seem to reflect the reality of life in 2012. Where is this magical place where the only big business criticized is the tobacco industry, where obesity is ignored as a health crisis, where zoning doesn't dictate where we can do what and when, but only smoking is unfairly affected, and governments happily spend billions on smoking related heath issues just so they can make a few extra bucks on cigarette taxes. :lol:

Fast Food and pharmaceuticals, to name just two, have not gotten equally criticized as tobacco. Smoking is going way down, while bad eating habits, obesity, and use of prescriptions drugs are not. I think obesity is actually on the rise, especially among children, which speaks for itself. As does volume of advertising for drugs, fast foods, and processed foods on television.

Sure, there is criticism of those companies but it has not reached anywhere near the same level as criticism of big tobacco. Part of the reason for that is tobacco is a smaller sector and easier to isolate.

In fact, I would say that the pharmaceutical industry did a lot to boost the anti-smoking campaign. Now that people aren't smoking, the industry is making a ton of money on anti-depressant drugs and anti-anxiety drugs prescribed to smokers, as well as nicotine replacement therapies.

Most of the criticism is lip service - i.e. gasoline companies offering greener fuel, McDonalds selling smoothies, companies cutting out trans fat.

It really comes down to economics. Obesity is barely behind smoking as a cause of death, but the economic cost of eliminating it as a problem is not seen as tenable at present to the powers that be, which have a huge influence over the public mindset at large and the media.

For example, an electric car has been a viable proposition for a long time. One of the major American auto producers actually squashed an effort to produce one - I can't remember the details but there was a rather disturbing documentary about it. It was suppressed because of the losses the electric car posed to the gasoline industry. Yes, it's coming - but it has been an unnecessarily slow process.

ETA: The Documentary was "Who Killed the Electric Car?" by Chris Payne. The company was GM.

snoopysnake
07-24-2012, 03:49 PM
I was admitted into the hospital on April of 2011. I had Necrotizing Fasciitis. I nearly died and almost lost my leg. While in recovery (ICU), one of my doctors asked me if I smoked. I told the doctor that I did and that I had smoked since I was 24 years old.

The doctor looked sort of surprised, and asked me how many packs of cigarettes did I smoke per day. I told him that it usually takes me around 3 1/2 days to smoke a pack. The doctor then said that according to x rays and other tests that my lungs looked clear. He said I had non-smokers lungs.

Needless to say, that surprised the heck out of me. I realized, however, after finding that out that I didn't want to end up having smokers lungs in the future.

A friend from the nursing facility I was staying at during the time told me about a vapor cigarette called "Smoke Assist". She showed me hers, and told me that she no longer coughed and her allergies were a lot better since she started using it. She said that she had chosen the tobacco flavored cigarette with nicotine. It came with 10 refill cartridges and a usb plug to recharge it with. Each cartridge was equivalent to 150 cigarettes. She said the best thing about it was that you no longer inhaled the smoke, tar, and other chemicals that were contained in a cigarette. The only thing you exhaled was water vapor.

Shortly after that, I ordered Smoke Assist online from Carol Wright, and I've used it ever since. I ordered the menthol cigarette with nicotine, and to me, it's just like smoking a cigarette except there's no more smelly smoke going into the lungs, chemicals or tar. With 10 refill cartridges included, that should last me a lifetime. :lol: There's a wall or car adapter that you can order, too.

Smoke Assist (http://www.carolwrightgifts.com/Personal-Care/Health-Products/Smoke-Assist/76103.cfm?clickSource=SEARCH)

I'm glad you posted what you did, Simone, because it gives me a chance to warn others about the "clear xray" issue.

I found out the following when my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer. Just because the lungs look clear on an xray does not mean that they have not been damaged by smoking. All that means is that there is no fluid or tumors found on the xray. The lung function is not measured by this. My mother thought she was all set when she had a "lungs are clear" chest x-ray. But her breathing ability was certainly quite poor (which she chose to ignore) by that time. About 2 years later she got the diagnosis of stage 4 lung cancer and the respiratory specialist (whom she really should have seen long ago, but was afraid or unwilling to) told me that her lung capacity was 98% gone in one lung and 100% in the other one.

My mother did not like her primary care doctor and probably had told him as little as possible about her coughing and poor breathing, and believed that a chest x-ray, which he did make her get, was the be-all and end-all on diagnosing the health of her lungs.

Edward
07-30-2012, 06:46 AM
Hi haribobo,
Smoking is bad for health and we must quit smoking to lead healthy life. Smoking may lead certain types of cancer. Smoking effects our heart and may results stroke or cardiovascular disease. Smoking effects our stamina and may be the cause of depression.


ADMIN EDIT: removing commercial link

Simone411
08-02-2012, 08:06 PM
I'm glad you posted what you did, Simone, because it gives me a chance to warn others about the "clear xray" issue.

I found out the following when my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer. Just because the lungs look clear on an xray does not mean that they have not been damaged by smoking. All that means is that there is no fluid or tumors found on the xray. The lung function is not measured by this. My mother thought she was all set when she had a "lungs are clear" chest x-ray. But her breathing ability was certainly quite poor (which she chose to ignore) by that time. About 2 years later she got the diagnosis of stage 4 lung cancer and the respiratory specialist (whom she really should have seen long ago, but was afraid or unwilling to) told me that her lung capacity was 98% gone in one lung and 100% in the other one.

My mother did not like her primary care doctor and probably had told him as little as possible about her coughing and poor breathing, and believed that a chest x-ray, which he did make her get, was the be-all and end-all on diagnosing the health of her lungs.

Good grief! Now I'm glad I posted that information, too. Yeah, I looked sort of puzzled at my doctor after he said my lungs were clear.

Thank you so much for posting about your mother. I think the best decision I could have made was purchasing Smoke Assist. Some people may not like it as much as I do. However, I'm no longer inhaling smoke with the tar and the harsh chemicals that are added to cigarettes. I'm only exhaling water vapor and there's no harm from that.