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View Full Version : When is a celebrity entitled to be left alone?



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GarrAarghHrumph
07-09-2012, 01:50 AM
My actor friends here in NY tell me they like living in or visiting NY, because here, celebrities are very common - even out in the suburbs. So they don't get hassled in quite the same way they do outside of this area (I can't speak for LA - perhaps it's similar there?) Here, they say people less often interrupt them when they're doing what I'd call "normal life stuff", and when they are interrupted, it's often done politely - someone asking if they can have a photo, rather than demanding one, for example.

screech
07-09-2012, 03:24 AM
I don't know, most accountants hate it if you're asking them for money advice in a social setting. Unless you're family/friends, even then, they get sick of doing it.

That's why I said what I said. People want to keep their personal and professional lives separate, which is why people should respect celebs outside of their jobs the same way they wouldn't ask an accountant for tax advice when they see them at a restaurant. Or a teacher about their child's grades when at a grocery store. If Britney Spears is getting groceries, she is not doing anything related to her job at that time and IMO should be treated as anyone else would be treated at the grocery store, and should be allowed respect and privacy.

manhn
07-09-2012, 07:40 AM
People want to keep their personal and professional lives separate, which is why people should respect celebs outside of their jobs the same way they wouldn't ask an accountant for tax advice when they see them at a restaurant.

People may want it but they also know it's just part of their profession. No point whining about it. Goodness gracious, people asking for tax advice from their accountant friends is now evil?

And my *waitress* asked me for tax advice at 2010 Canadians. I told her she should see an accountant but I answered some other questions. I and some other FSU'ers got free drinks out of it. Big whup.

ballettmaus
07-09-2012, 08:19 AM
I have also previously stated that I don't think celebrities should be bugged when they are just out and about as private citizens.

One could argue though that the celebrity in your example wasn't a private citizen when visiting the park. He jumped the line and asked to have the ride to himself as a celebrity, not as a private citizen, so I think people have a right to ask for an autograph. The celebrity opened the door himself.
Of course, people would have asked one way or another but the point is that any celebrity cannot ask to be a private citizen and yet enjoy the benefits of a celebrity at the same time. They have to make up their mind what they want to be.

Which doesn't change the fact that it's sad how people wouldn't leave celebrities alone if they were somewhere as private citizens and didn't ask for special treatments.
Celine Dion had to build her own water park on her own property to have privacy which I think is sad in regards to what our society has become.
That woman spends 3 hours after a concert signing autographs when she has the time, she should be able to go somewhere and have some family time and not be bothered! (just like every other celebrity)

skateboy
07-09-2012, 10:24 AM
I've run into a fair share of "famous" people in "normal" public places (restaurant, supermarket, airport, etc.). While I appreciate fandom, I've personally never felt compelled to say anything to them unless they speak to me (which rarely happens).

But when celebrities are being featured in a public event or performance, a meet-and-greet, or photo/autograph opportunities seems fair game. JMO.

cruisin
07-09-2012, 01:13 PM
Slightly off topic, but: It appears that Justin Bieber got himself in trouble, doing over 100MPH in his chrome car. His excuse, that paparazzi were following him. :rolleyes:

taf2002
07-09-2012, 03:03 PM
Celine Dion didn't have to build her own water park. Have you seen the rest of her estate? Pretentious doesn't begin to describe it.

MacMadame
07-09-2012, 04:25 PM
People may want it but they also know it's just part of their profession. No point whining about it. Goodness gracious, people asking for tax advice from their accountant friends is now evil?

And my *waitress* asked me for tax advice at 2010 Canadians. I told her she should see an accountant but I answered some other questions. I and some other FSU'ers got free drinks out of it. Big whup.
First of all, no one said it was evil. Nice hyperbole.

But, as a former computer consultant, I can say that it is tiresome and sometimes rude to have people ask for free advice all the time. The thing is, I would be well within my rights to tell people to make an appointment and I charge XX an hour or to just tell them I'm not helping them.

Just like a celebrity is well within their rights to refuse autographs or to have their picture taken no matter what the circumstances.

manhn
07-09-2012, 04:56 PM
First of all, no one said it was evil. Nice hyperbole.

Given the solemnity and righteousness applied to the discussion regarding the nerve of people asking for an autograph from Cate Blanchette at a park suggests to me that my "hyperbole" is not that far reaching a description.


Just like a celebrity is well within their rights to refuse autographs or to have their picture taken no matter what the circumstances.

Just like a person is well within their rights to ask for an autograph. The celeb can say yes or no. No need for people to get all huffy for having asked.

michiruwater
07-09-2012, 05:02 PM
Given the solemnity and righteousness applied to the discussion regarding the nerve of people asking for an autograph from Cate Blanchette at a park suggests to me that my "hyperbole" is not that far reaching a description.

Yes, you're right, clearly everyone here literally meant, though their less harsh words, that everyone who asked Cate Blanchett for an autograph is evil. Devil's spawn, in fact. Thank you for enlightening us to what we really meant.


Just like a person is well within their rights to ask for an autograph. The celeb can say yes or no. No need for people to get all huffy for having asked.

So, what about the people who then got huffy that she dared to say 'no'? Or did you not read the original post? People believe she should be accommodating because she is a celebrity. As though she isn't anything else.

I think it's completely rude to ask a celebrity for an autograph when they are out with their children. Imagine if everyone in the world knew your profession, and while you were at the zoo with your kids having family time people repeatedly walked up to you to ask for accounting advice.

manhn
07-09-2012, 05:05 PM
Or did you not read the original post?

Where in the original post was it mentioned that the autograph seekers got all upset? Did they threaten to kidnap her children?

michiruwater
07-09-2012, 05:17 PM
Um, no? Does a person have to threaten to kidnap someone else's children in order to be actually upset?


However people seem to think that she should be accommodating because she is a "star".

They were upset that she did not accommodate them. No kidnapping of children necessary. Just your standard, run-of-the-mill upset.

moojja
07-09-2012, 05:21 PM
That's why I said what I said. People want to keep their personal and professional lives separate, which is why people should respect celebs outside of their jobs the same way they wouldn't ask an accountant for tax advice when they see them at a restaurant. Or a teacher about their child's grades when at a grocery store. If Britney Spears is getting groceries, she is not doing anything related to her job at that time and IMO should be treated as anyone else would be treated at the grocery store, and should be allowed respect and privacy.

Sorry, it seems that I misunderstood your original comment. Most people seem to think if you work with money, then they can ask for investment advice regardless of the situation.

PeterG
07-09-2012, 07:49 PM
Slightly off topic, but: It appears that Justin Bieber got himself in trouble, doing over 100MPH in his chrome car. His excuse, that paparazzi were following him. :rolleyes:

Is it true that Bieber once tweeted that he thought he was the reincarnation of Princess Diana? Or is that just a rumour?

That I just started... :EVILLE:

numbers123
07-09-2012, 08:15 PM
People may want it but they also know it's just part of their profession. No point whining about it. Goodness gracious, people asking for tax advice from their accountant friends is now evil?

And my *waitress* asked me for tax advice at 2010 Canadians. I told her she should see an accountant but I answered some other questions. I and some other FSU'ers got free drinks out of it. Big whup.

But you had the chance to say no, and you got paid for it (free drinks for you and others). Would she have persisted if you said no? Did she expect you to do that just because? Does everyone stop and ask you for advice? Will they sell your advice for a profit?

I see only a slight similarity here, someone asked you for something.