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PeterG
07-07-2012, 06:44 PM
When is a celebrity entitled to be left alone?

When they are dead and buried.

That's what I say.

:EVILLE:

WindSpirit
07-07-2012, 08:32 PM
A celebrity is entitled to be left alone - when they say they do. We pay the celebrity to do their work - i.e. sports person gets paid to play or do sports, movie star gets paid to do movies, etc. They do not owe us any of the personal or downtime.
I might be all a flutter when seeing a celebrity but I don't think that I deserve an autograph or picture because I am not willing to pay them for those items. They do not owe me anything. That's pretty much my stance on it, too.

Generally I don't feel they owe me anything I'm not paying for. If I pay for a concert, they owe me a concert. If they come out after to shake hands with fans, that's a wonderful bonus, but still a bonus. They don't owe me that. If I pay for a movie ticket, they owe me the movie. I understand they owe the production company to market those films, do press junkets and show up at festivals, awards, etc. I think it's perfectly fine to ask for autographs there.

If they're on their private time, they don't owe the public anything. They still might sign autographs and pose for pictures if they choose to, but that's a really huge bonus (basically a gift) and shouldn't be exploited. Or expected. Or demanded. And some situations should be completely off limits. When they're busy; eating; on the phone; spending time with their family, etc.

I think many people approach it the wrong way. They feel entitled to a contact with a celebrity. And if they don't get what they want, they get pissed. Like I said, many celebrities are pretty accommodating but you have to understand that while to you it might a one-time event, they have multiple people interrupting them all the time and asking for things. If you really want their autograph/whatever, try to pick the least inconvenient for them moment. Do not interrupt them during things you wouldn't want to be interrupted by strangers. Read their body language. You can usually tell if people don't want to be approached or interrupted. If they don't, respect that. If you misjudged their willingness to be approached, accept their refusal and move on. It's really not rocket science.

overedge
07-07-2012, 09:16 PM
So what about celebrities whose PR people phone up paparazzi - with the celeb's approval and knowledge - and tell them that said celeb is going to the gym at X time, attending a private party at Y restaurant, etc. - so that the paparazzi can conveniently "find" the celeb and sell pictures of them to the tabloids? And then, when something bad happens in their life, send out press releases asking for "privacy at this difficult time".

I don't disagree that everyone has the right to a private life, but this is the sort of behaviour I mean when I say that you can't turn public attention on and off whenever it suits you.

ilovepaydays
07-07-2012, 09:17 PM
Totally agreeing with those who have said that celebrities are entitled to their own privacy when they want it.

I will give you a recent example. I was at a dinner for a Democratic political event when while I was in the bathroom washing my hands, there was Caroline Kennedy. She had just finished washing her hands and needed help with the paper towels. After I helped her, we both went back to out tables. It was a very friendly and normal exchange.

Later that evening, I overheard someone who was probably in her early-mid twenties say "Caroline Kennedy is staying at my hotel! And I saw her in the elevator! And I screamed 'DON'T I KNOW YOU....AAH!!!! YOU'RE CAROLINE KENNEDY!!!!!'" I was mortified that someone would have behaved that way around her. I don't care if she was the biggest celebrity in the Democratic Party that most of us would realistically ever run into.

WindSpirit
07-07-2012, 10:01 PM
So what about celebrities whose PR people phone up paparazzi - with the celeb's approval and knowledge - and tell them that said celeb is going to the gym at X time, attending a private party at Y restaurant, etc. - so that the paparazzi can conveniently "find" the celeb and sell pictures of them to the tabloids? And then, when something bad happens in their life, send out press releases asking for "privacy at this difficult time".

I don't disagree that everyone has the right to a private life, but this is the sort of behaviour I mean when I say that you can't turn public attention on and off whenever it suits you. I don't have a problem with it. For example, I think Kim Kardashian is a complete fame whore who made selling her private life her "job." I think she likes it and she craves attention. But when she asks for privacy because something bad happened in her life, I give her just that. I don't care if she's bluffing, etc. or people think she's being hypocritical. You know, do onto others... I know that if I asked someone for privacy I would appreciate it if they complied, so I'm doing the same.

Another example, quite a few celebrities got their sex tapes out there and they don't seem to care. If someone does, I wouldn't watch it. OK, I would have a big problem not watching it if I was attracted to that celebrity (I'm only human :drama:) Fortunately (or unfortunately ;)) no celebrity I really like has a sex tape out there. But seriously, if someone said it was stolen and they really didn't want it out there, I would most likely not watch it. It's hard for me to disregard someone's feelings like that, celebrity or not.

Your example, BTW, is kinda like saying, what about all those women who like people putting their hands up theirs skirts? Well, it doesn't mean that all women like it and it doesn't mean those very women who like it at times always like it.

I think it's always that person's call. Just by being celebrities they don't cease to have basic human rights.

And that's my take on it.

Wyliefan
07-07-2012, 10:05 PM
That's a good take.

numbers123
07-07-2012, 10:06 PM
how do you know the PR people called or asked to call the paps? because the paps said they did? or are you one of those who get called?

yes there are some PR whores, doesn't mean the majority are.

overedge
07-08-2012, 02:21 AM
how do you know the PR people called or asked to call the paps? because the paps said they did? or are you one of those who get called?

yes there are some PR whores, doesn't mean the majority are.

I said "those celebrities", which I think was pretty clear that some celebrities do this but not all.

And it's well known that there are PR people who call paparazzi to tell them where their clients are going to be. It's a quick and easy way to get a photo of the clients into circulation without a lot of work on the PR person's part.

overedge
07-08-2012, 02:31 AM
Your example, BTW, is kinda like saying, what about all those women who like people putting their hands up theirs skirts? Well, it doesn't mean that all women like it and it doesn't mean those very women who like it at times always like it.


Well, no, I don't think my example is like that at all. Having your career/income dependent on how well recognized you are and how many people are willing to pay money to see you perform is a little different than having a hand up your skirt.

And I agree with what you say about the Kardashians - although I don't think they, or the mom anyway, knows what "asking for privacy" really entails. Like Khloe cancelling the "reality" show with her and her husband because they didn't like the intrusion on their lives, and then her being on the cover of several tabloids the very next week talking "exclusively" about how they're trying to get pregnant. But I think that has more to do with the mom's (mistaken) concept for privacy rather than the poor daughters (who I actually feel kind of sorry for, because pretty much everything they do in their lives gets turned into commercial opportunities).


I think it's always that person's call. Just by being celebrities they don't cease to have basic human rights.


I don't disagree with that either. But I still see a contradiction in sending out a press release asking for privacy.

gkelly
07-08-2012, 02:40 AM
I said "those celebrities", which I think was pretty clear that some celebrities do this but not all.

But how do you know which ones they are?

You see celebrity Q in some nonofficial situation. You know that Q had been photographed and quoted in similar situations in the past, where it was unlikely that paparazzi would have known where they would be without having been tipped off.

But how do you know that 1) it was Q's publicist and not, say, an employee of the location who leaked the information, and 2) the publicist did actually consult in advance Q, and 3) Q enthusiastically agreed "Yeah, great, let's get my name and image out there!" rather than reluctantly agreed "Well, you gotta do your job, I gotta keep my name out there, I guess this occasion would be less intrusive than some other times you might have chosen"

overedge
07-08-2012, 04:50 AM
But how do you know which ones they are?

You see celebrity Q in some nonofficial situation. You know that Q had been photographed and quoted in similar situations in the past, where it was unlikely that paparazzi would have known where they would be without having been tipped off.

But how do you know that 1) it was Q's publicist and not, say, an employee of the location who leaked the information, and 2) the publicist did actually consult in advance Q, and 3) Q enthusiastically agreed "Yeah, great, let's get my name and image out there!" rather than reluctantly agreed "Well, you gotta do your job, I gotta keep my name out there, I guess this occasion would be less intrusive than some other times you might have chosen"

Those are all very good points. I know of two celebrities in the past who have instructed their PR agent to tip off the paps in the way I described (Pamela Anderson and Kid Rock, when they were married). But you're right that you can't know every time a celeb just happens to be caught at the gym, Starbucks, wherever, that it was their publicist who arranged for the paps to know where they were.

screech
07-08-2012, 06:06 AM
There is a fine line, I think. I wouldn't approach someone while they were out on a date, or eating a meal, or with their kids, etc. But I can't say that I wouldn't approach them if I ran into them on the street. But there is a way to be respectful about it, and respect their choices if they say no.

It's just like, if you saw someone you knew was an accountant, you might want to ask about your taxes, but there's a time, place and way to go about it.

A celeb's fame is related to their job, so ideally the best time to approach one is when they are doing things pertaining to their job. For example, next week is Comic Con in San Diego. If a celebrity has made their way to San Diego to participate in the event, they are expected to make themselves available to fans for those 5 days.

I'm a big fan of Alexander Skarsgard, who is Swedish, and he says that one of the things he loves about going home to Sweden when he has a break from True Blood or movies, is that there they're treated like just another person - nobody cares when he goes to the grocery store, or who he has lunch with. The odd person might approach him (and he's much more recognizable there than in the US) but not nearly to the level he gets in LA where he sometimes has to use back doors to restaurants and every single female he's seen with is automatically someone he's sleeping with. There were even people sneaking pictures of him working out at the gym and tweeting about his exercises. That (especially the gym stuff) is not OK in my books.

mag
07-08-2012, 08:38 PM
You're right - the fact that one celebrity was an asshole in your presence once means that celebrities don't deserve privacy.

That is not, in any way, what I posted. My point is that when a celebrity uses his celebrity to get something a non celebrity couldn't get, I think it is pretty poor form to get snarky with an 8 year old who asks for an autograph. Of course the celebrity has the right to refuse, no one is going to force him to sign. But, I also have the right to think he is a complete jerk. I have also previously stated that I don't think celebrities should be bugged when they are just out and about as private citizens. I will add that in my example the park employees looked really embarrassed. I can't say for sure, but it sure looked like they were led to believe that a few autographs would be okay.

moojja
07-09-2012, 01:04 AM
It's just like, if you saw someone you knew was an accountant, you might want to ask about your taxes, but there's a time, place and way to go about it.

I don't know, most accountants hate it if you're asking them for money advice in a social setting. Unless you're family/friends, even then, they get sick of doing it.

milanessa
07-09-2012, 01:29 AM
I don't know, most accountants hate it if you're asking them for money advice in a social setting. Unless you're family/friends, even then, they get sick of doing it.

:confused: Isn't that what screech said?