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michiruwater
07-06-2012, 08:50 PM
You're right - the fact that one celebrity was an asshole in your presence once means that celebrities don't deserve privacy.

agalisgv
07-06-2012, 08:55 PM
It sounds like you have a legitimate gripe with the amusement park. After all, they were the ones who allowed the line-jumping and taking over of empty cars. The celebrity cannot on their owndo that without the permission of the facility (cf. Little Nelly's rebuke at the Chesapeake arena when he demanded special treatment to watch the OKC Thunder play).

Just because a celebrity may be a jerk (which quite frankly many of them are) doesn't mean they lose their right to privacy. Civil rights aren't just for folk we like. And doing autographs shouldn't be seen as acceptable punishment for rude celebrities.

manhn
07-06-2012, 09:05 PM
Asking for an autograph is a breach of one's civil rights?

Gazpacho
07-06-2012, 10:57 PM
A few other situations in which it's wrong. I mentioned a doctor's office as one place where it's wrong to hound. Add legal office and pharmacy to that list.

Second, situations in which it would be inappropriate to ask for something from any stranger, famous or not. If they're making a phone call, are clearly busy or in a rush, or are clearly having a rough time, for instance.


Because someone stars in a movie/skates at the Olympics in no way makes them "owe" people their personal privacy. Their fame comes from their talent and performance.But their money comes from the fans. Think about how many extremely accomplished athletes there are who have no fame, no endorsements, and work at Home Depot to pay for basics. They are just as talented, just as hard working, and sometimes even higher achieving than athletes with the endorsements. The same goes for actors.

There are things that come with the territory when you purposely give yourself a big public presence. I :rolleyes: at celebrities who hire publicists to try to get their name everywhere but then complain about fans hounding them.

I don't give fans a blank check to hound them and do think there are situations in which it is completely wrong, but in other situations it may not be right, but I wouldn't say it's wrong either. Same goes for the celebrities who refuse.


In the 80s and early 90s, there was a huge market for baseball autographs in the card collecting community. It was not at all uncommon for card shop owners and other dealers in memorabilia to pay kids and young teens to get autographs as players have long been more inclined to sign for them than for adults.
...

I have long heard that Mattingly rarely signed at the ballpark or otherwise. I'm sure he knew about all these scams.As I said earlier, I think it's wrong to hound them and sell the photo, autograph, or whatever.

But most kids that approach them are actual fans. It's fine not to sign because of scam concerns, but there are polite ways to decline that don't hurt a kid's feelings.

Two other ways to negate autograph value are to sign in pencil and to write "To [full name]". Personalized and pencil autographs have very little value. Plus, I bet many kids who get an autograph with their own name on it would gladly return the bribe money in order to keep that autograph.

Badams
07-06-2012, 11:25 PM
When I met Bryan Adams, he wrote out an autograph to ME, on his ticket. He specifically said that people who have their autograph written to them by name won't go and sell it on Ebay, and he won't sign CD's or albums. At the time I couldn't imagine anybody wanting to sell anything that Bryan Adams wrote to them. :lol: I'm such a Bryan Adams UBER!

PDilemma
07-07-2012, 01:03 AM
Two other ways to negate autograph value are to sign in pencil and to write "To [full name]". Personalized and pencil autographs have very little value.

Uh...grab a baseball and try to sign it with a pencil. Ink barely works. You need a permanent marker.

And no one, kid or adult, wants their own name on an autographed baseball. Not for "resale" value, but because it is a small surface and because it is just not done.

overedge
07-07-2012, 02:20 AM
As I said earlier, I think it's wrong to hound them and sell the photo, autograph, or whatever.

But most kids that approach them are actual fans. It's fine not to sign because of scam concerns, but there are polite ways to decline that don't hurt a kid's feelings.


I sometimes skate at a rink where NHL teams train. I don't know if this is the same for other sports, but when the pro hockey players are there, by my guess 99% of the people asking for autographs are there because it's a business for them - they come prepared with Sharpies, binders full of high-quality photos in plastic sleeves, etc. etc. And they are very aggressive while hanging around the lobby and the team buses. The kids who are just there to see their favorite player often get pushed aside :(

MacMadame
07-07-2012, 03:40 AM
I still say it doesn't matter what the celebrity is doing. They are always entitled to be left alone. It may not be the smartest thing for their career or reputation depending on the circumstances but they are always entitled to privacy and no one is entitled to take it way from them just because they think the star has done something to make it okay.

numbers123
07-07-2012, 03:51 AM
A celebrity is entitled to be left alone - when they say they do. We pay the celebrity to do their work - i.e. sports person gets paid to play or do sports, movie star gets paid to do movies, etc. They do not owe us any of the personal or downtime.
I might be all a flutter when seeing a celebrity but I don't think that I deserve an autograph or picture because I am not willing to pay them for those items. They do not owe me anything.

Japanfan
07-07-2012, 08:27 AM
*They didn't ask for fame.


Yes, but some embrace it, invite it, exploit it, and benefit from it. And to a certain extent, get addicted to it and the public adulation that goes along with it.

I remember Robert Redford saying that one should be wary of celebrity, rather than welcome it. When he left Hollywood, started the Sundance Festival and got involved in various causes, he remained in the public eye, but his celebrity waned.

And he was one of the hottest in-demand celebs of his time.

KHenry14
07-07-2012, 09:49 AM
Well, in the age of TMZ, it's almost impossible for celebrities to not get hassled, no matter what they are doing. Harvey Levin has amassed a huge number of pap trolls with video cameras who hang out EVERYWHERE. And it doesn't matter how low of a D-Lister you are, they'll go after you. And when the see you, they ask stupid questions trying to get equally dumb answers. Essentially they try to provoke celebs into altercations.

Harvey Levin has taken what Walter Winchell and Hedda Hopper started and corrupted celebrity gossip into something mean and borderline eville.

Jot the Dot Dot
07-07-2012, 02:00 PM
A celebrity is entitled to be left alone - when they say they do. We pay the celebrity to do their work - i.e. sports person gets paid to play or do sports, movie star gets paid to do movies, etc. They do not owe us any of the personal or downtime.
I might be all a flutter when seeing a celebrity but I don't think that I deserve an autograph or picture because I am not willing to pay them for those items. They do not owe me anything.

Well put.

cruisin
07-07-2012, 02:14 PM
I think that celebrities should have their privacy when not participating in a public forum. I also think that celebrities should stick to what they know and not go off politically. I think it's lousy that all of their misfortunes under a microscope for all to dissect. What is amusing, however, is that they spend so much time trying to get famous enough to sign autographs, then they want privacy.

taf2002
07-07-2012, 06:21 PM
A celebrity is entitled to be left alone - when they say they do. We pay the celebrity to do their work - i.e. sports person gets paid to play or do sports, movie star gets paid to do movies, etc. They do not owe us any of the personal or downtime.
I might be all a flutter when seeing a celebrity but I don't think that I deserve an autograph or picture because I am not willing to pay them for those items. They do not owe me anything.

Totally agree. I call the shots with my own time/availability. Why wouldn't we accord a celebrity the same right? Unless a celebrity is at a meet 'n greet or some other type of autograph & photo taking event, and unless they agree to the contact, they should be left alone.

I once was seated at the same table as my object of fandom at an event. I talked to her the same way that I talked to the others there. I think she appreciated it. We admired each other's shoes & discussed jewelry. For me that is a much better memory than it would have been if I had gushed over her & asked for her autograph or a photo.

skatesindreams
07-07-2012, 06:37 PM
^^^
numbers and taf: Well said.

"Celebrities" deserve the same respect that you would offer any person in a similar situation.
They don't give up the right to be treated with dignity because they are well-known, or "in public".