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barbk
06-28-2012, 05:41 AM
UGG, hearing isn't checked until 18 months unless there is a problem. :)

Hmmm...here for at least fifteen years every infant has been checked in the hospital before discharge -- they put electrodes on the baby's skull, play various tones, and look at the resultant brain waves. My D was tested years before that as a newborn because a significant hearing loss runs in my family.

Hang in there, UGG. And remember -- you're not expected to be an expert in child development -- that's why pediatricians ask all those multitudes of questions.

Angelskates
06-28-2012, 06:01 AM
Hmmm...here for at least fifteen years every infant has been checked in the hospital before discharge -- they put electrodes on the baby's skull, play various tones, and look at the resultant brain waves. My D was tested years before that as a newborn because a significant hearing loss runs in my family.

I'm not talking about the one at the hospital. Everything is checked before a baby is discharged, but after that, it's not done until 18 months unless there's a problem. Many times, deaf children pass the pre-discharge test. My sister passed the sight test but is completely blind, and was almost 100% likely born that way (incredibly prem, and had a hole in her heart and lots of complications, so it could be that the life-saving procedures they gave her made her blind, we'll never know). My point was that UGG's paediatrician said that a baby's hearing isn't tested (after the initial one pre-discharge) until 18 months, and that's true, unless there is a problem. It can be tested, but it isn't usually. Her doctor made it sound like (to me) that it can't be done. Not only can it be done, since there is a problem, it should be done.

barbk
06-28-2012, 07:53 AM
I didn't know that, Angelskates. Yikes. Given our family history, I wish I had. While my D ended up with good hearing (at least for now) I know early intervention is so important for hearing loss.

UGG
06-28-2012, 12:40 PM
Angelskates I see what you are saying-He said "we don't test hearing until 18 months" and I took it as they don't test until 18 months unless their is a reason, and he did not seem to think, at this point, there was a reason. I kind of do but I am not a doctor, just a worried mama LOL.

Do you know why hearing is not looked into until 18 months? For me, my son not responding to his name, not even saying mama or dada at 16 months, and the multiple ear infections kind of point in that direction-to me anyway.
Perhaps the not pointing, waving, or clapping are throwing that possible cause to the side? I don't think any of that would be delayed due to hearing. maybe he has a few issues going on.

He is such a loving little boy and so adorable and he has the best smile and he is so handsome and has such a loving personality. I love him so much. I don't know how my heart will function if he struggles. I don't know how parents cope with that.

BigB08822 He makes eye contact with us for sure, and he throws balls and chases after them but if I stand in front of him with an object, and he is focused on something else, he totally ignores me-its as if I am not there. So if he is focused on something, he does track with his eyes. I think. Maybe I should pay more attention.

July 13 cannot come fast enough for me!!

Badams
06-28-2012, 02:25 PM
Call his doctor and see if you can get him in to see them about hearing. My son had sleep apnea, so I called his Dr. to see if they would look at him. She checked him out, saw his enormous tonsils, and gave us the option of wait and see, or see an ENT specialist. I picked the specialist. She took one look at him and immediately scheduled surgery. He had his tonsils and adenoids out and tubes put in his ears. My son is a bit speech delayed but is doing much better and it's only been a month since his surgery. If you think there's an issue, go with your gut and have him checked out!

mag
06-28-2012, 04:34 PM
Perhaps they do this in the evaluation, but I would also have his eyes tested. Hearing and eye tests are non invasive and easy to do so, IMHO, it makes sense to get them out of the way.

Angelskates
06-28-2012, 04:50 PM
Angelskates I see what you are saying-He said "we don't test hearing until 18 months" and I took it as they don't test until 18 months unless their is a reason, and he did not seem to think, at this point, there was a reason. I kind of do but I am not a doctor, just a worried mama LOL.

Do you know why hearing is not looked into until 18 months? For me, my son not responding to his name, not even saying mama or dada at 16 months, and the multiple ear infections kind of point in that direction-to me anyway.
Perhaps the not pointing, waving, or clapping are throwing that possible cause to the side? I don't think any of that would be delayed due to hearing. maybe he has a few issues going on.

He is such a loving little boy and so adorable and he has the best smile and he is so handsome and has such a loving personality. I love him so much. I don't know how my heart will function if he struggles. I don't know how parents cope with that.

BigB08822 He makes eye contact with us for sure, and he throws balls and chases after them but if I stand in front of him with an object, and he is focused on something else, he totally ignores me-its as if I am not there. So if he is focused on something, he does track with his eyes. I think. Maybe I should pay more attention.

July 13 cannot come fast enough for me!!

UGG, hearing tests at 18 months are usually just milestones tests, lots of time people skip them because they're not really necessary if there are no obvious issues. Speech and language also have milestone tests, as do a lot of fine and gross motor skills, eye sight etc. Usually people don't have them, and so often these issues are not picked up until the teacher picks them up in preschool or kindergarten (or later). Especially with first-born children, this is because parents don't yet have a true basis for "normal" - they sometimes compare to others' children, but haven't had any others themselves to form a good comparison. If a second-born is speech delayed, for example, parents usually notice that something is wrong, because they have their first born as a comparison.

Milestone testing starts at "birth" (with the first done pre-discharge from the hospital) and then continues at different intervals depending on the area. That's why a new mother has times to visit the paediatrician in advance (usually), just to make sure the child is progressing within normal limits (WNL). The same is done with measurements (height/length, weight etc.)

Milestone testing of any kind doesn't ever produce a diagnosis - it only ever results in "normal range" or "further testing required by (speech and language therapist etc.) due to (test result being below NL)."

As I said before, I don't think not pointing, waving, or clapping are a result of hearing issues. My family has a lot of experience with blind and deaf children and families, and this wasn't an issue with any of them, nor with any deaf or hard of hearing children I have worked with. If anything, they were better with non-verbal communication because their hearing issues hampered their verbal communication. That said, I am not a doctor and not qualified to make a diagnosis of any sort independently, especially over the internet. ;) You need to ask your doctor these questions - don't be shy! Remember that as a parent, you may need to fight sometimes; if you want the test - get it done. You do have valid reasons.

Educational assessments and diagnosis I can do, these kind of issues, I would be part of a team if I were involved - and I am usually only involved in 18 months or up unless it was an area of my specialty (communication disorders, bi/multilingual, blind, or autistic are the areas I am usually involved in earlier if they need me). Usually the hearing impaired children I work with earlier than 18 months are bilingual, so I am needed to help out with assessment because of the language barrier.

There could be multiple diagnosis, or just one. I think the reason some are asking about eye contact and tracking is because the other issues point to autism. Autistic children don't usually have good eye contact or tracking, and don't usually show affection easily. That said, I know some who have all of these skills.

Over the internet, just with the information you've given, your son could have global delay and/or hearing issues, or multiple other things. Again, it's impossible for any of us to know, and that's why you're son is being evaluated. Even though you are freaking out, an evaluation is a GOOD thing - it will give you answers of how you can help your son.

Again, I urge you to ask as many questions as possible to the people already involved in "real life" (not over the internet). While we can give you what we know and think, there are people, such as your son's doctor, who have met your son and are in a much better position to answer your questions - but you have to ask them! :)

UGG
06-28-2012, 05:06 PM
UGG, hearing tests at 18 months are usually just milestones tests, lots of time people skip them because they're not really necessary if there are no obvious issues. Speech and language also have milestone tests, as do a lot of fine and gross motor skills, eye sight etc. Usually people don't have them, and so often these issues are not picked up until the teacher picks them up in preschool or kindergarten (or later). Especially with first-born children, this is because parents don't yet have a true basis for "normal" - they sometimes compare to others' children, but haven't had any others themselves to form a good comparison. If a second-born is speech delayed, for example, parents usually notice that something is wrong, because they have their first born as a comparison.

Milestone testing starts at "birth" (with the first done pre-discharge from the hospital) and then continues at different intervals depending on the area. That's why a new mother has times to visit the paediatrician in advance (usually), just to make sure the child is progressing within normal limits (WNL). The same is done with measurements (height/length, weight etc.)

Milestone testing of any kind doesn't ever produce a diagnosis - it only ever results in "normal range" or "further testing required by (speech and language therapist etc.) due to (test result being below NL)."

As I said before, I don't think not pointing, waving, or clapping are a result of hearing issues. My family has a lot of experience with blind and deaf children and families, and this wasn't an issue with any of them, nor with any deaf or hard of hearing children I have worked with. If anything, they were better with non-verbal communication because their hearing issues hampered their verbal communication. That said, I am not a doctor and not qualified to make a diagnosis of any sort independently, especially over the internet. ;) You need to ask your doctor these questions - don't be shy! Remember that as a parent, you may need to fight sometimes; if you want the test - get it done. You do have valid reasons.

Educational assessments and diagnosis I can do, these kind of issues, I would be part of a team if I were involved - and I am usually only involved in 18 months or up unless it was an area of my specialty (communication disorders, bi/multilingual, blind, or autistic are the areas I am usually involved in earlier if they need me). Usually the hearing impaired children I work with earlier than 18 months are bilingual, so I am needed to help out with assessment because of the language barrier.

There could be multiple diagnosis, or just one. I think the reason some are asking about eye contact and tracking is because the other issues point to autism. Autistic children don't usually have good eye contact or tracking, and don't usually show affection easily. That said, I know some who have all of these skills.

Over the internet, just with the information you've given, your son could have global delay and/or hearing issues, or multiple other things. Again, it's impossible for any of us to know, and that's why you're son is being evaluated. Even though you are freaking out, an evaluation is a GOOD thing - it will give you answers of how you can help your son.

Again, I urge you to ask as many questions as possible to the people already involved in "real life" (not over the internet). While we can give you what we know and think, there are people, such as your son's doctor, who have met your son and are in a much better position to answer your questions - but you have to ask them! :)

Oh I know-I am also asking people in real life as well LOL. I decided to ask on here because no one is emotionally connected to me-my friends and family when I ask their opinion are saying "oh boys always take longer than girls" "don't worry he will catch up" etc...which I am sure is not to worry me.My sister in law was horrified at the whole thing and thinks its being blown out of proportion. So...IRL it is hard to get honest opinions! My doctor of course, can give us the opinion that we need to have him evaluated-which he has done. I did ask questions but he would make no mention of autism or anything like that- I am sure because my son has not been evaluated yet. Basically as you said, the milestones are markers to see if intervention is possibly needed or not and he, at this time, thinks it is warranted. He did blow over the hearing test pretty quickly but I think I am going to revisit that again and believe me I already have a page full of questions for the people who are coming to do the evaluation.

So-like you said-I am not using what people say here as diagnosis or anything-just looking for possible outside experience or maybe speak with someone who has gone through this as well. :)

Aceon6
06-28-2012, 05:39 PM
Spoke to my niece in law last night about her experience with her son. In hindsight, she said that she should have paid as much attention to what was right as to the problem areas. You might want to add "Does he have any particular areas where he's in the upper percentile?" to your list of questions. The reason for that is that the intervention folks can include strength activities mixed in with activities that the children might find frustrating. My niece had to circle back with the evaluator to get information on what her son's strengths were so that the pre-school could include them in his plan.

barbk
06-28-2012, 05:42 PM
What a great idea, Aceon6.