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essence_of_soy
06-23-2012, 03:34 PM
I don't know if this has hit North America and Europe yet, but tonight when I attempted to post a message on Facebook, I was faced with a USD $1.40 payment charge. I certainly didn't accept and let the message go by the wayside.

Thinking it was some kind of bug, I ran a search and unfortunately, it appears to be a test strategy part of a global roll - out.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18033259

For those of you old enough to remember iSkater, it reminds me of the overnight decision made to charge people for using their forum and message boards. The site became a ghost town overnight.

I'm thinking the FB team may have kicked my habit once and for all.

Holley Calmes
06-23-2012, 03:43 PM
Facebook isn't just chat fun for me. I use it extensively for business communication and publicity. I sure hope this isn't going to happen. Non profits don't have a lot of money to spend as it is. Taking away this wonderful free form of "getting the word out" would be horrible.

Kruss
06-23-2012, 03:43 PM
If it reaches here, I won't pay. Google+ is still free...

essence_of_soy
06-23-2012, 03:46 PM
Facebook isn't just chat fun for me. I use it extensively for business communication and publicity. I sure hope this isn't going to happen. Non profits don't have a lot of money to spend as it is. Taking away this wonderful free form of "getting the word out" would be horrible.

Yes, I have a promotional professional Facebook page as well. That hasn't been affected (as yet).

Erica Lee
06-23-2012, 03:49 PM
Facebook will always be free. They get their revenue from businesses, advertising, games - all of which need a significant audience. You're not the customer, you're what's being sold.

What the article is describing is to pay to PROMOTE a post. This has existed for a long time, though they are definitely emphasizing the possibility to do so more now. It's a form of advertising. You can still post, as normal, for free. Paying to promote means that it would be seen by more people. Some businesses would use this if they had a special announcement or promotion that they wanted as many people to read as possible.

michiruwater
06-23-2012, 04:26 PM
I got rid of Facebook in February and I don't miss it even a little.

Polymer Bob
06-24-2012, 08:38 PM
I don't know if this has hit North America and Europe yet, but tonight when I attempted to post a message on Facebook, I was faced with a USD $1.40 payment charge. I certainly didn't accept and let the message go by the wayside.

Thinking it was some kind of bug, I ran a search and unfortunately, it appears to be a test strategy part of a global roll - out.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18033259

Essence: When you were asked to pay the $1.40 to "promote" your message, were you given the option of sending your message the old way without paying?
If you were NOT given a choice, that would be a different situation what the article appears to indicate. There is no "promotion" unless people have a choice not to pay.

Holley Calmes
06-25-2012, 12:42 AM
I know I can "purchase" ads on Facebook, but none of them are $1.40! I don't take advantage of this offer. I can't imagine something so potentially lucrative as Facebook won't succumb to pay-as-you-go in the future. I sure hope not, or not soon.

Google ads are very effective-at lest for me. but they are only like 50 cents per hit.

Polymer Bob
06-25-2012, 03:05 AM
I have trained myself to ignore all the crap that pops up on Yahoo and Google.
A couple of years ago, Yahoo was inserting ads right into people's email messages. The practice was so unpopular, that it was stopped very quickly. I guess these people try to see what they can get away with. It's our duty as customers to show them.

Jenny
06-25-2012, 02:11 PM
For those of you old enough to remember iSkater, it reminds me of the overnight decision made to charge people for using their forum and message boards. The site became a ghost town overnight.


Facebook will always be free. They get their revenue from businesses, advertising, games - all of which need a significant audience. You're not the customer, you're what's being sold.

Thread drift - but this is exactly the mistake iSkater made. They looked at the membership numbers and saw a revenue stream - when what they should have seen is what Facebook saw - an audience they could sell to other businesses.

jollibee
06-25-2012, 03:48 PM
I got rid of Facebook in February and I don't miss it even a little.


Care to give some reasons why? I am always interested in hearing why people leave FB, it makes me feel better that I don't use mine 24/7 like other people.

michiruwater
06-25-2012, 04:06 PM
My primary reason is that I got really sick of people in my life feeling that they had a relationship with me because they could see my Facebook status updates, but whom never spoke to me at all or very rarely. After I deleted it I suddenly started getting calls from people who would have never called me before, all of which started with, "I noticed you deleted your Facebook so I thought I'd see what was going on!"

My secondary reason was that I absolutely have no trust in Facebook's privacy policy whatsoever.

Skate Talker
07-02-2012, 03:43 AM
Won't use it when it is free so a pay version certainly won't get my business.