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Eden
06-18-2012, 05:47 AM
German neo-Nazis helped the Palestinian terrorist organisation Black September to carry out the infamous massacre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_massacre) of 11 Israeli athletes during the 1972 Munich Olympic Games.
Der Spiegel (http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4243463,00.html)magazine published today the above details based on a hitherto secret, 2,000-page document on the massacre, held by Germany's Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution which were revealed yesterday, 4 decades after the massacre.

Until now it had been assumed that Black September bore sole responsibility for the kidnapping and murders but according to the newly-released German intelligence file, neo-Nazis also helped to prepare the massacre and planned to carry out further terrorist acts in Germany to avenge the police killing of Palestinian terrorists in Munich.

Israel has been lobbying for a minute's silence to be observed in memory of the massacre at this summer's Olympic Games in London.

Rob
06-18-2012, 04:20 PM
Israel has been lobbying for a minute's silence to be observed in memory of the massacre at this summer's Olympic Games in London.

What is the argument against doing this? It would seem like a fitting tribute 30 years later.

I will never forget watching the coverage of the tragedy during the Munich Olympics. I was 11 and it stuck with me. I am interested in reading at least some this report.

Garden Kitty
06-18-2012, 06:32 PM
What is the argument against doing this? It would seem like a fitting tribute 30 years later.


Their public argument seems to be that official commemorations were held on the 25th and 30th anniversaries of the event and that Rogge will attend the Israeli team's reception in memory of the athletes at the London games, but that the opening ceremony should reflect the host nation and is not the place for a commerative event.

However, like most things the IOC does, there is always a political undertone, and there is a suggestion that they want to avoid stepping in the middle of Israeli/Arab tensions, or opening the official ceremonies to other causes and issues deemed "worthy". Naturally the counter argument is that this is in tribute to athletes killed at the Games themselves and this really is a unique issue.

Lacey
06-19-2012, 01:11 AM
Wait, am I wrong, isn't it 40 years?

Eden
06-19-2012, 06:23 AM
Ankie Spitzer*, widow of fencing coach Andre Spitzer, who was killed by Palestinians in the Munich massacre, says that a minute of silence is a fitting tribute for athletes who lost their lives on the Olympic stage.

According to her (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aEVmxjYwJy0) it is the proper way to honor the memory of the 11 victims. A moment of silence contains no statements, assumptions or beliefs and requires no understanding of language to interpret, says Ankie.

Canada's House of Commons unanimously passed a motion to commemorate (http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/canada-joins-campaign-to-mark-40th-anniversary-of-munich-olympics-massacre-1.436688)the "tragic terrorist events of the 1972 Munich Olympics wherein 11 Israeli athletes were murdered." Following that decision, the Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird sent a letter to Jacques Rogge, IOC president, saying Canada "strongly supports Israel's request" for a moment of silence at the opening ceremony in London.


Wait, am I wrong, isn't it 40 years?
No, you're not wrong and it is 40th year anniversary of the Munich massacre.



________
*Ankie Spitzer- led the fight to get the German government to admit their culpability in the failed rescue of Andre and the others. Today she is a correspondent in Israel for Dutch and Belgian television.

Rob
06-19-2012, 09:22 PM
Wait, am I wrong, isn't it 40 years?

yeah it is. old....

Eden
06-27-2012, 03:51 PM
Latest news on this matter (http://www.cija.ca/israel-advocacy/the-us-australia-and-germany-urge-olympic-moment-of-silence-for-munich-victims/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-us-australia-and-germany-urge-olympic-moment-of-silence-for-munich-victims):


The US, Australia and Germany have joined the global effort calling on the International Olympic Committee to observe a moment of silence at the 2012 London Olympics commemorating the 11 Israeli athletes and coaches who were murdered at the 1972 Games in Munich by members of the Palestinian terrorist group Black September.

paskatefan
07-03-2012, 10:24 AM
IMHO, it would be shameful if a moment of silence is not observed for this tragedy.

allezfred
07-03-2012, 10:48 AM
Apart from it being the 40th anniversary, I'm having a hard time trying to understand why there is a big push happening for it at this Olympics. There has never been a minute of silence observed at any other summer Olympics apart from Munich. The date of the massacre doesn't even fall during the period of this year's Olympics.

By all means have a ceremony somewhere on site where people who want to honour those killed in Munich in 1972 can attend. I just don't get the logic with wanting to have it during the Opening Ceremony.

Cyn
07-03-2012, 03:17 PM
Given the events of the past four years not only in the Middle East but in so many other areas of the world, I think that a moment of silence is more than appropriate.

While what happened in Munich in 1972 does not come close to the horror and brutality of events that take place around the world, it is without a doubt IMO the most tragic even that has taken place at any Olympic games and is in a way symbolic of what takes place all over the world every day. On the 40th anniversary of what happened, a moment of silence to honor the memories of those who were massacred serves not only as a reminder that low, but (in addition to celebrating athletic excellence from each country) to send a message that in spite of our differences, we as the human race in its entirety can (and will hopefully) triumph in overcoming the enmity and hatred and celebrate that which we share in common.

allezfred
07-03-2012, 04:23 PM
Given the events of the past four years not only in the Middle East but in so many other areas of the world, I think that a moment of silence is more than appropriate.

A general minute of silence for every tragedy that has happened in the last four years (why four?) is a hell of a lot less likely to happen. Besides I'm sure every interested party would be demanding they get their own minute of silence. It would make for a very quiet opening ceremony though. :lol:


While what happened in Munich in 1972 does not come close to the horror and brutality of events that take place around the world, it is without a doubt IMO the most tragic even that has taken place at any Olympic games and is in a way symbolic of what takes place all over the world every day. On the 40th anniversary of what happened, a moment of silence to honor the memories of those who were massacred serves not only as a reminder that low, but (in addition to celebrating athletic excellence from each country) to send a message that in spite of our differences, we as the human race in its entirety can (and will hopefully) triumph in overcoming the enmity and hatred and celebrate that which we share in common.

OK, nobody else is going to say it so I will. A minute of silence is a downer on what is supposed to be a celebration of the world coming together. We don't want to be reminded that certain groups of people hate each other. It's the Olympics. :slinkaway

Even in Munich they had a separate memorial ceremony and I remember reading that several Arab countries objected to having their flags flown at half mast. It shouldn't be political, but it is.

SHARPIE
07-06-2012, 12:28 AM
I was wondering if some respects to those that lost their lives in London the day after the Olympcs were awarded to the city on 7-7-2005 would be appropriate actually.

SHARPIE
07-06-2012, 12:37 AM
OK, nobody else is going to say it so I will. A minute of silence is a downer on what is supposed to be a celebration of the world coming together. We don't want to be reminded that certain groups of people hate each other. It's the Olympics. :slinkaway

Agreed, it's the Olympics - Not a Pageant

allezfred
07-06-2012, 01:20 AM
I was wondering if some respects to those that lost their lives in London the day after the Olympcs were awarded to the city on 7-7-2005 would be appropriate actually.

I can see that being more appropriate. Wouldn't be surprised if one of the relatives of the victims carried the torch.

Eden
07-06-2012, 08:21 AM
The 2012 London Olympics may be having a memorial ceremony after all.
The JC reports (http://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/69588/lord-coe-hold-personal-memorial-israeli-olympic-victims)that Lord Sebastian Coe (Chairman of the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games) informed his staff in a London City Hall meeting of a memorial ceremony planned for the Olympics opening day.

The moment of silence movement has gained global momentum across the US, Canada, Australia, Israel, and countries throughout Europe.
German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle joined the campaign by writing of his support for the minute of silence to Jacques Rogge.
More than 50 British members of parliament have signed a motion calling for a minute’s silence. The effort is backed by the German Bundestag, about 100 Australian members of parliament, the Canadian parliament and the U.S. Senate.

Ankie Spitzer the widow of Andre Spitzer told in an interview to The Guardian (http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jun/26/munich-olympics-massacre-fight-for-remembrance)that since 1972 her request to remember those victims was rejected:

"The IOC says it's not in the protocol of the opening ceremony to have a commemoration. Well, my husband coming home in a coffin was not in the protocol either. This was the blackest page in Olympic history. These 11 athletes were part of the Olympic family, they were not accidental tourists. They should be remembered as part of the Olympic framework."

The current IOC president, Jacques Rogge, who was an athlete at the Munich Olympics, told Spitzer that rejecting the request had been his most difficult decision but his hands were tied. "I said: 'No – my husband's hands were tied, his feet were tied, to the furniture.' It's been 40 years. I feel like a fool, banging on doors every four years. But they have never had such an onslaught as this year. We will do everything in our power to try to change their minds."

Rogge and Coe are "nice people", says Spitzer. "But they are impotent. I can only come to one conclusion or explanation: this is discrimination. I have never used that word in 40 years. But [the victims] had the wrong religion, they came from the wrong country."

Israel’s perspective was that since its athlets were brutally murdered during the Olympic Games, it is IOC's moral responsibility to remember them at the opening ceremony – and not at some side venue like it has been so far.