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PDilemma
06-18-2012, 09:26 PM
I will respectfully disagree. My church has a service specifically designed to help those seeking citizenship. green cards or any other access to legal residency in the US (usually at no charge due to the outreach programs and funding). Many of their clients are well versed in what they thought the processes would be and spoke fairly fluent English and still needed help with the whole process.

This.

Additionally, I know someone who spent a few years working at a company that was contracted to process immigration paperwork. There are two piles. Those submitted with/by lawyers and those without. Guess which ones don't get thrown out (forcing the immigrant to start over) if a form is out of order? And they really were instructed to throw the entire pile of forms out if one tiny thing was wrong.

A.H.Black
06-18-2012, 10:10 PM
I appreciate all the comments. Thanks, especially, for sticking to the subject.

I find myself wondering how my neighbor got his citizenship with comparative ease. Of course, he had been here a long time, owned his own home, and had a green card. Still, after reading all the experiences here, I can only think the people at his work really helped.

I think his wife is here legally, She is from Salvador (as they say) and has been married here before and divorced and has other children. I have suggested they check at the Spanish church congregation nearby. I also suggested he talk to the same people who helped him. He's a good neighbor so I wish him well.

agalisgv
06-18-2012, 10:21 PM
I know someone who spent a few years working at a company that was contracted to process immigration paperwork. There are two piles. Those submitted with/by lawyers and those without. Guess which ones don't get thrown out (forcing the immigrant to start over) if a form is out of order?. Interesting

On their website, they explicitly say that is not the case, and there is no preference nor expedition associated with obtaining a lawyer. They actually warn people about relying upon immigration assistance for applying for things since many times those are scams that take people for money or otherwise get people into immigration trouble.

maatTheViking
06-18-2012, 10:26 PM
I have have a Canandian co-worker with a US wife, he got his citizenship with relative ease. However, he already had a green card.

Does she have a green card?
It seems that getting a green card is step one, and should be smooth if they are married and he is a citizen (and she has no criminal/illegal activities).

It is still A LOT of paper work. My husband and I got ours through work, and they had lawyers filling out the whole thing. It was all very complicated - lots of forms (Americans do love thier forms!), lots of things like marriage certificates, birth certificates, exam papers, statements from manager (since this was a work visa)

Actually, step one should be for her to make sure she has a valid birth certificate, that will help in every thing.

PDilemma
06-18-2012, 10:32 PM
Interesting

On their website, they explicitly say that is not the case, and there is no preference nor expedition associated with obtaining a lawyer. They actually discourage using immigration lawyers for applying for things since they say there's no tangible benefit for doing so, and too many times the lawyers are scamming people for money when they get no different results than if you had filled out the forms (properly) yourself.

Let's just say the person I know who worked there went from having a super conservative "can't they just come here legally?" view of immigration to being adamantly in favor of comprehensive immigration reform and disgusted by the process. This paperwork gets shuffled to contracted private companies all over the country, lost in transit, and a lot of the stuff INS says about it isn't actually true. And they are all classified employees and get threatened to keep them quiet about how it all works. He was not supposed to tell us anything about what he did.

agalisgv
06-18-2012, 10:35 PM
^^^ Again, interesting.

Was this awhile ago? I ask because you referred to them as INS, and they haven't been called that for awhile. I'm just wondering if things might have changed in the interim.

PDilemma
06-18-2012, 10:45 PM
^^^ Again, interesting.

Was this awhile ago? I ask because you referred to them as INS, and they haven't been called that for awhile. I'm just wondering if things might have changed in the interim.

Only three or four years. I don't know that employees there used the most correct terms since they were not government employees. This stuff has been contracted out. The company is still there and still has the same government contract to process immigration paperwork. It is sent there after being opened at a government office, sorted and checked for accuracy (as in everything being in the packet) there, then sent off to another state to another private company for more processing. It is unskilled labor. And if they drop a form out of a pile, they are instructed not to pick it up. In all likelihood then, the immigrant would be notified that they have failed to submit one form and have to start over. My source used to pick them up but was sometimes reprimanded for "wasting time".

agalisgv
06-18-2012, 10:58 PM
Wow, that's really incredible (in a sad way).

numbers123
06-18-2012, 11:19 PM
I know that this is a sort of tongue in cheek flow chart (http://reason.org/files/cb299f0134ca8bb75243c69caa92eea7.pdf) and not sure of the accuracy, but have seen it in many different settings when discussing citizenship. or this one (http://immigrationroad.com/green-card/immigration-flowchart-roadmap-to-green-card.pdf) is even more complicated.

Even if it is not completely true - it shows the hoops needed to be jumped through. Right now, this issue is one that ignites my social responsibility of if not me, then who and if not, then when but that is an argument best suited for the PI

cruisin
06-19-2012, 12:24 AM
That second chart was :scream:! The first one was depressing, but at least you could follow it. Based on that chart, it would appear that the OP's neighbor's fiancee should be able to get citizenship more "easily".

kwanfan1818
06-19-2012, 12:59 AM
People still speak of "landing" and "Landed Immigrants" for Canadian permanent residency, even though this hasn't been the correct term for a number of years, including the people at CBSA (border patrol). I was asked a few trips ago when I "landed."

I certainly can understand this, since I still refer to IJS as CoP, and after one work divisions name (initials, really) changed three times in two years after re-organizations, I just picked one and used it.

El Rey
06-19-2012, 05:30 AM
I applied for my citizenship back in 1998, together with my mother and sister. We were green card holders and it wasn't difficult at all. We basically just filed, paid the costs, and got fingerprinted. We were all assigned the same interview date. When it was my turn to interview, the interviewer saw that I had applied one month before my 18th birthday and denied my application. Apparently, I was too young to apply, although I had applied with my family. My mother (who doesn't speak English) and sister passed the test. Basically, get a lawyer.

kwanfan1818
06-19-2012, 06:11 AM
Not much related to Homeland Security has been easy after 9/11.

cruisin
06-19-2012, 01:58 PM
I applied for my citizenship back in 1998, together with my mother and sister. We were green card holders and it wasn't difficult at all. We basically just filed, paid the costs, and got fingerprinted. We were all assigned the same interview date. When it was my turn to interview, the interviewer saw that I had applied one month before my 18th birthday and denied my application. Apparently, I was too young to apply, although I had applied with my family. My mother (who doesn't speak English) and sister passed the test. Basically, get a lawyer.

That really surprises me (well, not really). I know that you can't alloy if you are younger than 18. But, it is my understanding that if you have a parent who is a citizen or who is also applying, that you don't have to be 18.

Gazpacho
06-19-2012, 09:22 PM
Do you live in the Bay Area, by any chance? If so, you can get 1992 Olympic gymnastics champion Tatiana Lysenko (http://youtu.be/oWFe0WFCtVo) to represent the case. She's now an immigration lawyer in the Bay Area.

When I read that's she's a lawyer in the US, I thought it must be somebody else named Tatiana Lysenko. But it's her! Amazing that someone who didn't start learning English as an adult is now an American lawyer!