PDA

View Full Version : Teachers: Define critical thinking



Pages : 1 2 [3]

Aceon6
06-08-2012, 01:39 PM
Except that isn't a measurable skill. The STAT order always takes precedence. :lol: We don't really teach triage as that isn't within the radiographer's scope of practice. Your manager was actually in non-compliance with the ARRT.

Problem was, they were all submitted as STAT, so the rad staff had to sort them out. Which STAT is more STAT? This was a large outpatient center, and at times, there'd be a dozen people waiting, all dependent on films to determine what happened to them next.

rfisher
06-08-2012, 01:48 PM
Problem was, they were all submitted as STAT, so the rad staff had to sort them out. Which STAT is more STAT? This was a large outpatient center, and at times, there'd be a dozen people waiting, all dependent on films to determine what happened to them next.

:lol: Outpatient's aren't STAT. That isn't triage based on a patient's critical needs. That's a scheduling issue for management. Who should have clearly gone to senior management and requested additional equipment and technologists. I actually cover things like this in our management track but it's not something we would deal with in the general radiography curriculum.

Aceon6
06-08-2012, 01:54 PM
:lol: Outpatient's aren't STAT. That isn't triage based on a patient's critical needs. That's a scheduling issue for management. Who should have clearly gone to senior management and requested additional equipment and technologists. I actually cover things like this in our management track but it's not something we would deal with in the general radiography curriculum.

True this was a funked up system as it was a blended building. No one took any time to explain to the docs that STAT in the O/P rad center weren't the same as STAT in the I/P imaging department. Docs went back and forth, so they tended to be in I/P mode most of the time and if they ordered it STAT, they were always calling down to see what the problem was. Of course, it never occurred to them that 11 other docs were also ordering STAT. Real world, unfortunately.

Back to the critical thinking thing... can you do anything around patient flow management or cultural competence, or are the students not at that level?

jeffisjeff
06-08-2012, 02:19 PM
I know this, but every time I make this point, I am shot down in flames by people who are convinced that a math test is a math test and all the answers are right or wrong.

Ugh. The idea that these things can be objectively quantified is silly. Quantified, sure. But objectively? Of course not. Failure to acknowledge the subjectivity of assessments is a dangerous trait in an educator or administrator.

numbers123
06-08-2012, 03:40 PM
Back to the critical thinking thing... can you do anything around patient flow management or cultural competence, or are the students not at that level?

If I understand rfisher's original question it was related to a new standard of department of education requiring all courses to have a measurable objective goal for the courses, including those who are a bit "soft or esoteric" in nature.

She is able to place those measurements on the clinical courses and that their programs have had to have those objectives in places as regulated by the state boards of the profession and the professional regulation of the Radiology Technologists. Plus she has been writing those for years, whereas the new regulations must be implemented as mandated by the DoE by this fall or experience the removal of the course in the University's program.

For as much as rfisher wants to be a hard nose professor, she is probably trying to help her collegues write some measureable outcomes with critical thinking component and was asking if we knew about any. just my assessment of the situation :slinkaway

Prancer
06-08-2012, 06:27 PM
Ugh. The idea that these things can be objectively quantified is silly. Quantified, sure. But objectively? Of course not. Failure to acknowledge the subjectivity of assessments is a dangerous trait in an educator or administrator.

It's not being ignored; on the contrary, it's considered a major problem.

I am not explaining this well because I am somewhat confused myself, but as I understand it, the problem is that one of the major purposes of the whole objective-assesment-rubric-assignment approach is that it is supposed to precisely clarify the purpose and expectations for a particular assignment, in part to avoid confusion on the part of the students.

So, if I tell students to write a research paper, for example, I break the assignment down into its component elements in a rubric. One of those elements would be the thesis statement. So I would say "clear, effective thesis" and that would be worth X points, and I would define the thesis in a breakdown, just as agalisgv said, something like this:

Thesis clearly identifies subject
Thesis clearly identifies position
Thesis clearly predicts course of paper
Thesis is appropropriate for audience

Theoretically, this should identify for the student all the things that must be done in order to earn full points for the thesis statement. The expectation was that this method would reduce student confusion and the perception of subjectivity in the assessment process.

What has happened, however, is that student complaints about subjectivity in assessment have increased, not decreased. Some are inclined to blame this on the increase in student complaining in general, but it seems to me that this should have been anticipated, as it does NOT make grading less subjective; au contraire, the subjectivity of the grading criteria is now explicitly spelled out. What is "clearly"? And what is "appropriate"?

It is what I say it is, essentially. As PL said at the beginning of the thread, I know it when I see it.

So the question at my assessment seminars was, how do we eliminate that kind of subjectivity in assessment and make the process more objective and standardized?

I don't see how it can be done. In the end, it comes down to my judgment. That's essentially what they pay me for--my educated judgment of student work. But as we have seen in K-12 education, teachers are not trusted to judge student work on their own. It's all creeping upward. I predict that we will see some sort of standardized terminal assessment for degree programs before I escape retire.

PrincessLeppard
06-08-2012, 08:19 PM
In the end, it comes down to my judgment. That's essentially what they pay me for--my educated judgment of student work. But as we have seen in K-12 education, teachers are not trusted to judge student work on their own.

QFT. Either trust me to do my job or fire me.

rfisher
06-08-2012, 09:01 PM
I predict that we will see some sort of standardized terminal assessment for degree programs before I escape retire.

Yes. That is the next step in the particular format our affiliate has opted to use. They call it Degree Profile. It's going to be tied to federal funding. What some faculty don't seem to have realized is if you don't find assement tools for your class that can be tied into program and university wide goals and outcome assessments, your class will be considered unnecessary and eliminated. Meaning your job is on the line. Our programs are better than most non health care programs because we did a lot of this already. My problem is that I not only have to meet programmatic accreditation by JRCERT, I also have to meet the affiliate university's requirements and sometimes there is a real disconnect between the two. It takes real critical thinking on my part to accomadate both. That and dealing with a faculty that is entrenched in how things used to be and why do we have to change anything. Just today I heard "the technologists in the imaging department won't fill out the student evaluation forms....they just mark it all good.." So I said then we need to develop a different assessment tool that we can use. The reply" why do we need to change anything? The forms are just fine and we don't need to do anything different." It can't be both!!!
Online and distance course are facing new guidelines as of this fall. Many of these classes are going to be reclassified as correspondance courses and federal student aid will not cover them. There must be 10 seminars being offered over the summer to insure any online class meets the new guidelines. The University cannot afford to lose that money.

Really
06-09-2012, 04:14 AM
http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/260