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skatesindreams
06-16-2012, 02:40 PM
I think Karl Wallenda is turning in his grave. Death-defying acts are what made the Wallendas, and being tethered isn't death-defying.

Karl Wallenda wouldn't have been permitted to do most of the things he did, were he doing them now, because of "liability" issues.
I'm glad that Nic achieved his dream.
However, I hope that we don't have a rash of foolish, ill-advised copycat "stunts" due to his success.

Cachoo
06-17-2012, 04:41 AM
:( Were they permanently paralyzed?

This is awful to say, but I didn't watch the Niagara walk but probably would have watched if it had been untethered. With the tether, the only thing on the line (pardon the pun) is his reputation.

For the record, I am VERY VERY GLAD that he was required to wear the tether. I am also very impressed that he can walk a rope like that with the wind and water in the background.

But there's something about Philippe Petit's clandestine not-made-for-TV stunt that makes me like Petit more than Wallenda.

Ita! Hearing Petit in an interview recently I'm not sure he would have cared if only he and his crew witnessed it. He seemed driven to his do his walk with or without publicity.

4rkidz
06-17-2012, 04:48 AM
other than the crap commentators.. i actually found his walk amazing.. even if he was tethered - he balanced on that wire with all the winds and water from the falls.. pretty amazing.. and the scenery was just incredible..

mkats
06-17-2012, 05:53 AM
Does anybody remember the Reader's Digest feature story about Angel Wallenda in the 1990s (can't remember what year)? I remember reading it as a kid and thinking, wow, to walk a tightrope on an artificial leg?? :eek::respec:

I wrote one of my college essays about her and being a stupid teenager with no understanding of what not to post on the internet, slapped it on my (public) livejournal and forgot about it. A few years later I got an anonymous comment - all they said was that they had known Angel Wallenda and that she would have been very pleased to have read that essay.

:respec: Nik Wallenda. The whole family here was watching with bated breath yesterday.

Badams
06-17-2012, 02:42 PM
other than the crap commentators.. i actually found his walk amazing.. even if he was tethered - he balanced on that wire with all the winds and water from the falls.. pretty amazing.. and the scenery was just incredible..

ITA! He was tethered, but not once did he rely on it, and they said over and over beforehand that it wasn't ever tested, he had never used it before, and they aren't even sure it would have worked had he needed it. I don't think it should take away anything from what he accomplished. Considering it was illegal since 1890, imagine the hoops he had to jump through just to get the permission to do it, from 2 countries! And of course there was a ton of publicity surrounding this, the area needs attention, and he helped them get it. They weren't letting it happen without a becoming spectacle.

skatesindreams
06-17-2012, 03:07 PM
Does anybody remember the Reader's Digest feature story about Angel Wallenda in the 1990s (can't remember what year)? I remember reading it as a kid and thinking, wow, to walk a tightrope on an artificial leg?? :eek::respec:

I wrote one of my college essays about her and being a stupid teenager with no understanding of what not to post on the internet, slapped it on my (public) livejournal and forgot about it. A few years later I got an anonymous comment - all they said was that they had known Angel Wallenda and that she would have been very pleased to have read that essay.

The book was "High Wire Angel".

Articles about her:

http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-29/local/me-247_1_wire-act
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19900507&id=SmoaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=FCwEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6229,8436614
http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-29/local/me-247_1_wire-act

Her obituary:
http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-29/local/me-247_1_wire-act
http://articles.nydailynews.com/1996-05-04/news/18006580_1_wallenda-family-flying-wallendas-high-wire

WindSpirit
06-17-2012, 03:24 PM
I can't believe some people would find the whole thing more interesting if he hadn't been tethered. It's like saying the possibility of death is what makes it so wonderful and fascinating, not his actual ability to balance on a steel wire in extraordinary circumstances.

If that wire was 10 inches above the ground, most people could do it. Very few people in the world could do what he's done, and being tethered has nothing to do with it.

taf2002
06-17-2012, 05:39 PM
I can't believe some people would find the whole thing more interesting if he hadn't been tethered. It's like saying the possibility of death is what makes it so wonderful and fascinating, not his actual ability to balance on a steel wire in extraordinary circumstances.

If that wire was 10 inches above the ground, most people could do it. Very few people in the world could do what he's done, and being tethered has nothing to do with it.

Thank you. That's exactly what I was thinking as I read thru this thread. If he had been untethered & had fallen to his death, the youtube video of it probably would have gone viral...that's what people like. ugh

skatesindreams
06-17-2012, 05:58 PM
Unfortunately, I think you are right, taf!

Skittl1321
06-17-2012, 06:19 PM
If that wire was 10 inches above the ground, most people could do it. Very few people in the world could do what he's done, and being tethered has nothing to do with it.

Do you really think so? I don't think many people could do this even if it was 10 inches above the ground. That is a LONG time to maintain balance.

But yes, I think it is just as interesting a feat with the tether. There are very few people who could have done such a thing. (I have issues driving over the bridge across the Mississippi River- it terrifies me. Walking on a wire across Niagra Falls? No way.)

Alixana
06-17-2012, 06:49 PM
But yes, I think it is just as interesting a feat with the tether. There are very few people who could have done such a thing. (I have issues driving over the bridge across the Mississippi River- it terrifies me. Walking on a wire across Niagra Falls? No way.)

Agreed. You couldn't get me to walk a wire across the falls .. even if I was wearing 100 tethers!!! :yikes: :scream:

Gazpacho
06-17-2012, 07:12 PM
Agreed. You couldn't get me to walk a wire across the falls .. even if I was wearing 100 tethers!!! :yikes: :scream:I personally wouldn't go through the training it would require to be able to walk on a tightrope, but there are plenty of people who would be willing to do it with a tether.

With the tether, it's less dangerous than, say, climbing a very high mountain or doing a difficult rock climbing route.

Given that he was tethered, I had hoped he would take some risks such as dancing on the rope, like Philippe Petit did (without a tether :yikes:).

I also read that Nik Wallenda is trained in making hail-Mary attempts at saving himself should he slip. If he slipped, he was trained to react fast enough to be able to grab onto the rope with his arms and legs, raise himself up, and sit on the rope until help arrived. That's far from a guarantee, but it was enough of a possibility that he arranged for a private helicopter rescue before knowing that he had to be tethered.

mkats
06-17-2012, 07:29 PM
I tried walking a wire about 3 feet off the ground once. I fell and got tangled in the net. :shuffle:

taf2002
06-17-2012, 08:13 PM
I have terrible balance. I couldn't stay on a line drawn on the floor.

Vash01
06-20-2012, 10:27 PM
I did not watch it but I am impressed, just reading about it.