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View Full Version : Interview with Weir `Deep down I'm an old Russian Lady'



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Wyliefan
06-12-2012, 03:26 AM
They invade any Johnny thread with this bashing because they are professional Johnny bashers.

Professional? You can get paid for it? Where do I sign up? :D ;)

Bournekraatzfan
06-12-2012, 06:32 AM
Johnny makes my skin crawl. I posted this in the "NYC Ballet Fans" thread, but I'm reposting here. This is NOT appropriate attire for a ballet gala.

http://bfanyc.com/home/photo/404451#anchor

Goodness, how many Birkin bags does Johnny own?!

Alex Forrest
06-12-2012, 12:32 PM
I hope his training is going well, but I fear this is like Cohen back in 09. When Weir first came on the scene I was a huge fan. I loved his effortless skating, particular that 3axel-3toe, and predicted he'd be on many world and olympic podiums. Then it seemed he got caught up in a cult of personality rut, he didn't bother to learn the new IJS rules and sometimes gave away wins or podiums for lack of basic math skills. The worse his skating and results, the more outrageous his interviews and behavior were. I hope married life has stablilized him a bit more and he reenters competition and training with more maturity and respect for his talent.

misskarne
06-12-2012, 12:55 PM
Goodness, how many Birkin bags does Johnny own?!

Yes...it would probably look better if he wasn't begging for sponsors and bragging about his Birkin bags in the same breath.

That just really, really, really bugged me.

psycho
06-12-2012, 03:53 PM
Johnny knows IJS rules perfectly well. Anyone listening to his commentary at 2010 worlds or 2012 nationals knows that. ;) Also, IJS is not a perfect indicator of your worth as a skater. It is simply a system du jour that is used to score current competitive performances. There is much more to skating than that.

In fact, there is more than one way to achieve success in skating. One way is to pander to the judges (and federations, and play a political game etc.) and win at all costs. That gets you top medals. But another way is to put out memorable, athletic AND artistic product out there, which captures the audience's hearts and minds. You pander to the audience first and foremost. And that's a way to achieve skating glory and international fan support. So just because Johnny (either consciously or unconsciously) took the second road to success, arguably the less travelled one, that does not make him a failure. He has put out countless memorable and breathtaking performances, and just because they did not result in top medals (for whatever reason) does not diminish them in any way. That's why he has hordes of fans and supporters around the world. And that's why he is considered a success by so many (as much as that irks a few others;)).



Yes...it would probably look better if he wasn't begging for sponsors and bragging about his Birkin bags in the same breath.

That just really, really, really bugged me.

Why? These things are not mutually exclusive. He is looking for sponsors, not standing on the street corner asking for change. Sponsorship is a mutually beneficial relationship between a product and a person asked to promote it.

allezfred
06-12-2012, 03:57 PM
Johnny knows IJS rules perfectly well.

Shame he has never applied them. :shuffle:



In fact, there is more than one way to achieve success in skating. One way is to pander to the judges (and federations, and play a political game etc.) and win at all costs. That gets you top medals. But another way is to put out memorable, athletic AND artistic product out there, which captures the audience's hearts and minds. You pander to the audience first and foremost. And that's a way to achieve skating glory and international fan support. So just because Johnny (either consiously or unconsciously) took the second road to suceess, arguably the less travelled one, that does not make him a failure. He has put out countless memorable and breathtaking performances, and just because they did not result in medals (for whatever reason) does not diminish them in any way. That's why he has hordes of fans and supporters around the world. And that's why he is considered a success by so many (as much as that irks a few others;)).

:lol:

zaphyre14
06-12-2012, 04:12 PM
[QUOTE=psycho;3592869]Johnny knows IJS rules perfectly well. Anyone listening to his commentary at 2010 worlds or 2012 nationals knows that. ;) Also, IJS is not a perfect indicator of your worth as a skater. It is simply a system du jour that is used to score current competitive performances. There is much more to skating than that.

In fact, there is more than one way to achieve success in skating. One way is to pander to the judges (and federations, and play a political game etc.) and win at all costs. That gets you top medals. But another way is to put out memorable, athletic AND artistic product out there, which captures the audience's hearts and minds. You pander to the audience first and foremost. And that's a way to achieve skating glory and international fan support. So just because Johnny (either consiously or unconsciously) took the second road to suceess, arguably the less travelled one, that does not make him a failure. He has put out countless memorable and breathtaking performances, and just because they did not result in medals (for whatever reason) does not diminish them in any way. That's why he has hordes of fans and supporters around the world. And that's why he is considered a success by so many (as much as that irks a few others;)).

QUOTE]

But if your stated goal is to WIN medals in an athletic competition, then it's to your advantage to play within the current structure of the sport. Ignoring those rules or choosing to favor personal expression over them puts you at a disadvantage when you're up against against equally talented, equally well-trained competitors who have opted to do the opposite. And you don't do yourself any favors when you comment negatively about the very establishment that you expect to reward with the aforementioned medals that you covet.

Johnny is his own worst enemy.

psycho
06-12-2012, 04:24 PM
But if your stated goal is to WIN medals in an athletic competition, then it's to your advantage to play within the current structure of the sport. Ignoring those rules or choosing to favor personal expression over them puts you at a disadvantage when you're up against against equally talented, equally well-trained competitors who have opted to do the opposite.

No one said he ignored the rules. He just did not make pandering to every aspect of COP his main priority, at the expense of putting out a quality product on the ice. That may have cost him a few points, but it gained him a lot of fans. You win some, you lose some.


equally talented, equally well-trained competitors who have opted to do the opposite.

Are we talking about the real world here? :lol:This kind of uniformity can rarely be achieved in a lab experiment with rats, much less with actual living-breathing people!


And you don't do yourself any favors when you comment negatively about the very establishment that you expect to reward with the aforementioned medals that you covet. Johnny is his own worst enemy.

To each his own. Some people call that "own worst enemy," some call that integrity. When Takahashi went for a quad in Vancouver - even though it was undervalued and he had low chance of landing it - some people said that was stupid. Others saw it as admirable, because it was his conviction to do so, and he wasn't willing to sacrifice his convictions, even if it might cost him. At the end of the day, it's up to the person to decide how much they are willing to sell out for a goal. It's their own choice and they are the ones who have to live with it.

gkelly
06-12-2012, 05:31 PM
But another way is to put out memorable, athletic AND artistic product out there, which captures the audience's hearts and minds. You pander to the audience first and foremost. And that's a way to achieve skating glory and international fan support. So just because Johnny (either consciously or unconsciously) took the second road to success, arguably the less travelled one, that does not make him a failure. He has put out countless memorable and breathtaking performances, and just because they did not result in top medals (for whatever reason) does not diminish them in any way. That's why he has hordes of fans and supporters around the world. And that's why he is considered a success by so many (as much as that irks a few others;)).

Fair enough.

And other skaters have chosen to put out products athletic and artistic products that are memorable to different segments of the audience -- some of them with more competitive success than Weir, some with less.

There's room in skating for different styles and different approaches. No skater is going to be the favorite of all fans.

The fact that Weir has managed to attract a large following of devoted fans is a measure of his success at what may matter most to him. His skating just speaks to many fans on an emotional level.

And it leaves other fans cold. And some of his comments or behaviors rub some people the wrong way even if they enjoy or are neutral about his skating.

As long as we all acknowledge that no one will be beloved by everyone, there's no need to try to tear a skater down or to try to build him up in other people's eyes beyond their own honest reactions. Live and let live. Enjoy the skating and the skaters you enjoy. Lots of fans love Weir's skating. Lots of others don't care for it so much. So what?

psycho
06-12-2012, 05:56 PM
Fair enough.

And other skaters have chosen to put out products athletic and artistic products that are memorable to different segments of the audience -- some of them with more competitive success than Weir, some with less.

There's room in skating for different styles and different approaches. No skater is going to be the favorite of all fans.

The fact that Weir has managed to attract a large following of devoted fans is a measure of his success at what may matter most to him. His skating just speaks to many fans on an emotional level.

And it leaves other fans cold. And some of his comments or behaviors rub some people the wrong way even if they enjoy or are neutral about his skating.

As long as we all acknowledge that no one will be beloved by everyone, there's no need to try to tear a skater down or to try to build him up in other people's eyes beyond their own honest reactions. Live and let live. Enjoy the skating and the skaters you enjoy. Lots of fans love Weir's skating. Lots of others don't care for it so much. So what?

I agree with everything you've said. Some people like some skaters, some people don't. No one is asking anyone to love or even like Weir. But it would be nice if every thread of his did not quickly turn into a bashfest by the same individuals who never liked him and never will. And I would advocate the same for any other skater out there.

zaphyre14
06-12-2012, 06:00 PM
It would also be nice if Weir's fans would allow non-fans to state their opinions with constantly being accused of "bashing" by said fans.

skatesindreams
06-12-2012, 06:04 PM
I agree with everything you've said. Some people like some skaters, some people don't. No one is asking anyone to love or even like Weir. But it would be nice if every thread of his did not quickly turn into a bashfest by the same individuals who never liked him and never will. And I would advocate the same for any other skater out there.

You spoke for me.

PinkFeathers
06-12-2012, 06:08 PM
It would also be nice if Weir's fans would allow non-fans to state their opinions with constantly being accused of "bashing" by said fans.

Sub in Johnny's name for any other skater/team discussed here imo :slinkaway

bardtoob
06-12-2012, 06:35 PM
Non-fans shouldn't bash :argue: Fans shouldn't accuse non-fans of bashing :argue: Non-fans shouldn't bash :argue: Fans shouldn't accuse non-fans of bashing . . . :rollin: Sonia, Cecelia, Tenley, Carol, Linda, Annette, Roz, Kat, Deb, Midori, Kristi, Nancy, Tonya, Nicole, Michelle, Tara, Irina . . . Johnny, Evan

minignome
06-12-2012, 06:49 PM
He just did not make pandering to every aspect of COP his main priority, at the expense of putting out a quality product on the ice.


To each his own. Some people call that "own worst enemy," some call that integrity. When Takahashi went for a quad in Vancouver - even though it was undervalued and he had low chance of landing it - some people said that was stupid. Others saw it as admirable, because it was his conviction to do so, and he wasn't willing to sacrifice his convictions, even if it might cost him. At the end of the day, it's up to the person to decide how much they are willing to sell out for a goal. It's their own choice and they are the ones who have to live with it.

But the flip side of this is that when you choose to not pander, to live with "integrity", you should also accept the results of your choices. You shouldn't then complain about being under appreciated, under scored, under supported, under politicked for, underwhatever for not pandering to the rules set forward to win the competition. If you want to be artistic instead of a COP whore fine. But accept the fact that the COP whores are going to be ahead of you in the standings when the judges award marks based on COP rules.