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View Full Version : Ice Dancer Anastasia Galyeta suspended 18 months by ISU due to anti-doping violation



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Sylvia
06-02-2012, 10:08 PM
This decision of the ISU Disciplinary Commission was published on May 21, 2012 as ISU Communication 1731 (PDF link): http://t.co/NXNyQfKr

Excerpts:

...
III. Facts
1. The Alleged Offender is a 19 years old ice dancer from Kiev, Ukraine and member of the Ukrainian Figure Skating Federation. She participated in the Ice Dance Event at the 2011 /2012 ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Quebec City, December 8-11, 2011.
2. Following an in-competition Anti-Doping test carried out on December 10, 2011, the ISU received an adverse analytical finding for sample 2616504 from the Alleged Offender. The said sample was found to contain Furosemide, which belongs to class S5 (Diuretics and Other Masking Agents) of the 2011 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Methods.
...
Decision
1. Anastasia Galyeta is declared responsible for an Anti-Doping violation, committed on December 10th 2011 at the ISU Junior Grand Prix Final in Quebec, Canada.
2. A period of ineligibility of 18 months, beginning on December 10th 2011 and ending on May 9th 2013, is imposed on Anastasia Galyeta.
3. The Ukrainian Figure Skating Federation has to reimburse the ISU for the costs of these proceedings and the laboratory fees of the Anti-Doping testing.
4. The skater bears her own costs.

ETA: Yuri Larionov (of Bazarova/Larionov) was also suspended after testing positive for Furosemide at the 2007 JGP Final. He was originally suspended for 2 years by the ISU and the Russian federation later filed a successful petition to have his sentence reduced to 18 months.

centerpt1
06-02-2012, 10:30 PM
Seems a very severe punishment for taking a diuretic.

Eislauffan
06-02-2012, 10:33 PM
The problem is more the fact that furosemide can be used as a masking agent for serious doping substances, therefore the sentence it carries is harsh.

agalisgv
06-02-2012, 10:33 PM
It's considered a masking agent for other drugs.

ETA: Eislauffan beat me to it

kirkbiggestfan
06-02-2012, 10:35 PM
Would she be taking a diuretic to lose weight? Are diureticts masking asgents for other drugs?
I saw her skate in Quebec and she impressed me, but felt she could have a much stronger partner.

Eislauffan
06-02-2012, 10:39 PM
According to the ISU document she claimed to have taken the furosemide containing medication because of a swollen face and excess weight.

Back then in the Larionov case it was also suspected that he took it in order to loose weight but he claimed he took it inadvertently because it was in a pill he took against a severe headache.

Eislauffan
06-02-2012, 10:42 PM
She is 19 years old and should know better than taking a medication without checking what it contains. At least she should have consulted the team doctor.
I think that's it for her and Alexei Shumski now.

Bogie
06-02-2012, 11:11 PM
Does anyone know the types of drugs that furosemide masks?

Lara
06-02-2012, 11:21 PM
She is 19 years old and should know better than taking a medication without checking what it contains. At least she should have consulted the team doctor.
I think that's it for her and Alexei Shumski now.

Agreed. Stupid mistake on her part, unfortunately. Even a quick Google search would likely show that furosemide is banned, but you still don't take something without consulting the team doctor (not a pharmacist who may be misinformed).

misskarne
06-02-2012, 11:42 PM
No sympathy here either...she's 19, she's a big girl now, and any athlete at that level should absolutely know about the drug regulations. At the very least, common sense would dictate that you at least ask the team doctor.

I've heard every excuse under the sun, including the oft-used "I didn't know it was in the tablet"...well if you didn't know what was in the tablet, why on earth did you take it?

Sad for her partner though.

Sylvia
06-02-2012, 11:49 PM
I think that's it for her and Alexei Shumski now.
IIRC, I saw Galyeta's name listed on icepartnersearch.com not long after the JGP Final in December 2011 - perhaps that was when she was notified by the ISU that she had tested positive?

millyskate
06-02-2012, 11:53 PM
No sympathy here either...she's 19, she's a big girl now, and any athlete at that level should absolutely know about the drug regulations. At the very least, common sense would dictate that you at least ask the team doctor.

I've heard every excuse under the sun, including the oft-used "I didn't know it was in the tablet"...well if you didn't know what was in the tablet, why on earth did you take it?

Sad for her partner though.

She's from Ukraine. "A quick google search" presumes that she speaks English well enough and that she has regular access to the internet; I know many a 19 year old female Ukrainian who would be likely to make the same mistake. It's IMO no coincidence that the country has such a high rate of athletes getting caught for doping offences.
When you're raised in a country where the law isn't really the law and there's always a $$ way around it, you just don't have the same perception of things. Ask the member of the olympic committee who recently got caught by the BBC trying to sell his tickets on the black market. I'm quite sure he didn't have the sense he was doing anything that bad either.
And by the way... the perception that Ukraine has a team doctor is rather, well, westernized. I'm sure there are some they can go to who take $$ to sign the medical certificates they require and who are willing to offer medical assistance in case of need . Not one who is obssessed with ensuring the athletes are following the doping regulations.

Eislauffan
06-03-2012, 12:33 AM
And by the way... the perception that Ukraine has a team doctor is rather, well, westernized. I'm sure there are some they can go to who take $$ to sign the medical certificates they require and who are willing to offer medical assistance in case of need . Not one who is obssessed with ensuring the athletes are following the doping regulations.

The Ukraine has team doctors that are travelling to international competitions with the skaters and for sure can be consulted outside the competitions as well. Also, one of the ISU medical advisors is from the Ukraine (he used to be team doctor as well before he was promoted to medical advisor).

As an athlete that competed at the international level for several years, Anastasia Galyeta is aware of anti-doping controls etc.

But I feel sorry for her. She made a stupid and costly mistake.

alj5
06-03-2012, 01:04 AM
lasix / furosemide will attempt to mask any drug filtered through the kidneys, and will cause people to lose any excess water weight (think CHF patients with "wet" sounding lungs or massive swelling in their feet/legs). It is also used (in combo with other drugs) to kick start kidneys (aka urine production) that are in early kidney failure.

As a MD, I cannot think of any reason why a healthy 19-year old athlete would be taking this medication. Ever.

triple_toe
06-03-2012, 01:08 AM
Not to be pedantic, but it's Ukraine, not The Ukraine. "The Ukraine" is considered offensive to some Ukrainians because it implies colonialism to Russia. Ukrainians are often very independent-minded so that's a hot button issue.