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View Full Version : Ice Dancer Anastasia Galyeta suspended 18 months by ISU due to anti-doping violation



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Gil-Galad
06-03-2012, 10:41 PM
Pretty much only ignorant assholes will.
While I believe in being respectful towards others, I highly doubt that everyone who calls Côte d'Ivoire "Ivory Coast" is automatically an "ignorant [...]". Especially considering the fact that Ivory Coast is the direct translation.

On the other hand I don't think it's "highly presumptuous" of countries to pleasantly ask others to respect their national identity by adjusting the terminology a bit.

I think a little mutual tolerance and flexibility might be a good idea here.

(Maybe Germany should start protesting against all those different names we've got in the world. Especially since both "Germany" and the French / Spanish "Allemagne" are kind of historically incorrect. The name Germany indicates that we are the descendants of the Germanic tribes, which is only partly correct, since we have also lots of Celtic ancestors, as well as Roman and Slavic ones. And I know quite a few Germans, who feel uncomfortable with the name Germany, since Hitler played up the whole Germanic heritage angle. Plus, it's highly unoriginal, Julius Caesar used it in his writings and suddenly everyone was calling the region / people "German / Germanic". Allemagne / Alemania is quite interesting as a name, Alemanni was a union of several southern Germanic tribes between 300 and 599 A.D.. The Franks conquered "Alemanni" in 496, and funnily enough, the name somehow stuck. Oh, and the Finnish and Estonian people call us Saxons. The best name we have in the slavic countries though, they all use variations of the protoslavic němъ, which means mute / dumb - only because back in the day they couldn't understand the Germanic tribes. I mean, what's fair about that?)

MacMadame
06-04-2012, 12:22 AM
Taking medications without clearing it with anyone official is a really stupid mistake to make. Since when are pharmacists up to date regarding the list of banned substances?
There's at least one iPhone app and that lists all the substances banned by WADA or you can just go to their website and look things up. It's not really that hard to be up on what is and isn't banned.

The hard part is knowing what is in substances that don't clearly list their ingredient. But most of the time those kinds of substances are not things you really have to be taking as they tend to be home remedies and nutritional supplements. Any medicines will list their active ingredients and you can just look them up on the WADA list and know if you can take them or not.

carriecmu0503
06-04-2012, 01:22 AM
There's at least one iPhone app and that lists all the substances banned by WADA or you can just go to their website and look things up. It's not really that hard to be up on what is and isn't banned.

The hard part is knowing what is in substances that don't clearly list their ingredient. But most of the time those kinds of substances are not things you really have to be taking as they tend to be home remedies and nutritional supplements. Any medicines will list their active ingredients and you can just look them up on the WADA list and know if you can take them or not.

It's easy to look up of you have access to the Internet. While it is often taken for granted in N. America and much of western Europe, it CANNOT be assumed that people in Ukraine and other eastern European countries have that access. Also, the information may not be available in Russian.

triple_toe
06-04-2012, 02:14 AM
Seriously guys? I'm not being snotty, I'm simply pointing out that "The Ukraine" is considered offensive to many Ukrainians. It's an outdated term that comes off as disrespectful today. I didn't think anyone was using the term maliciously here but knowing that the term is incorrect could prevent an awkward situation in the future.

Vagabond
06-04-2012, 05:00 AM
Pretty much only ignorant assholes will.

Do you honestly not see how condescending your stance is? Or are you just pulling our collective leg?

Pardon me, genevieve, but as someone who has always respected your point of view here on FSU, I have to ask, are you serious? Do you not see how condescending your own question is?

Not every person in the English-speaking world -- not even every college graduate -- is well versed in the world geography, let alone official name changes. That doesn't necessarily make those who don't know any better "ignorant assholes."

With respect to Myanmar, many people, notably Aung San Suu Kyi (http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Aung_San_Suu_Kyi#Quotes_about_Aung_San_Suu_Kyi), prefer to use the old name, Burma, because they do not recognize the legitimacy of the regime that changed the name of the country.

With respect to Côte d'Ivoire, Gil-Galad summed up everything I would say.

With respect to Ukraine, people who were adults at the time the Soviet Union split apart grew up referring to "the Ukraine," not "Ukraine." The fact that they never "got with the program" and dropped the definite article doesn't make them ignorant assholes. Chances are, at some point, the article will drop from general use.


On the other hand I don't think it's "highly presumptuous" of countries to pleasantly ask others to respect their national identity by adjusting the terminology a bit.

If that's what they're doing. That's not always the case, particularly when its citizens take offense at something about which most native speakers of English have little knowledge.

triple_toe
06-04-2012, 05:25 AM
Since, as you say, there is apparently "little knowledge" of it, I'm just trying to increase awareness ;)

skateboy
06-04-2012, 05:35 AM
Seriously guys? I'm not being snotty, I'm simply pointing out that "The Ukraine" is considered offensive to many Ukrainians. It's an outdated term that comes off as disrespectful today. I didn't think anyone was using the term maliciously here but knowing that the term is incorrect could prevent an awkward situation in the future.

I'm happy you've pointed this out, as I had no idea that "The Ukraine" was incorrect. So now I know.

(Although I'll admit never knowing WHY it was "The" Ukraine in the first place. Why not "The Belarus," "The Latvia," "The Turkmenistan?" And don't get me started on "The Bronx." :D)

Swurvestar1
06-04-2012, 11:30 AM
I agree that it was really a stupid mistake for her to make, but she must suffer the consequences.

When I competed, I was always concerned about drug tests and took them very seriously, and I was nowhere near her level and was quite a bit younger than her as well.

allezfred
06-04-2012, 11:44 AM
With respect to Myanmar, many people, notably Aung San Suu Kyi (http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Aung_San_Suu_Kyi#Quotes_about_Aung_San_Suu_Kyi), prefer to use the old name, Burma, because they do not recognize the legitimacy of the regime that changed the name of the country.


The name of the country hasn't been changed. It's always been "Myanmar" in Myanmarese. Just like Bombay has always been "Mumbai" and Calcutta has always been "Kolkata".

Those who persist in using "Burma" can tell themselves they are taking some kind of a noble stance, but what they are actually doing is reinforcing the type of colonialism that went around the world changing the names of countries to suit the language they spoke.

Skittl1321
06-04-2012, 01:36 PM
Also, the information may not be available in Russian.

Her federation should be responsible for making sure the athletes have the drug restriction information available. Russian speaking countries are not new to sports- surely this information has got to be available to them, and not just figure skaters but ALL the athletes.

There are no excuses for athletes taking banned substances anymore. Doping control is not a new thing. Every elite athlete is aware of the restrictions and has to deal with this.

misskarne
06-04-2012, 02:40 PM
It's easy to look up of you have access to the Internet. While it is often taken for granted in N. America and much of western Europe, it CANNOT be assumed that people in Ukraine and other eastern European countries have that access. Also, the information may not be available in Russian.

Don't try and pull this excuse out.

My state association is tiny. So tiny we have no clubs. ISA isn't exactly a major force in the figure skating world. Our rink is a pathetic shambles.

And yet on the noticeboard are copies of the drugs policy. The committee keeps a copy of the list and makes it available to anyone who needs it. A skater can go to the committee or to the ISA to find out. You don't even need the internet if you don't have it.

If our little association can do it, I can imagine a national skating federation like Ukraine would be MORE than capable.

You're trying to excuse the inexcusable.

MacMadame
06-04-2012, 04:13 PM
It's easy to look up of you have access to the Internet. While it is often taken for granted in N. America and much of western Europe, it CANNOT be assumed that people in Ukraine and other eastern European countries have that access. Also, the information may not be available in Russian.
:rolleyes: I see skaters from those countries all over FaceBook and Twitter. And that information is available everywhere in every format. WADA doesn't want to be tricking athletes into failing tests. They want to stop cheating. They don't HIDE the information.



When I competed, I was always concerned about drug tests and took them very seriously, and I was nowhere near her level and was quite a bit younger than her as well.
I agree. I'm a recreational triathlete, never even been on a podium, but we have random drug testing so when I have a cold or other medical issue, I always look up every drug I'm thinking of taking on the WADA list.

PairSk8Fan
06-04-2012, 05:33 PM
Does anyone know the types of drugs that furosemide masks?

ALL.

Diuretics would cause increased water to be excreted by the kidneys, which will cause diluted urine, lowering the concentration of any and all drugs excreted into the system, including metabolites of drugs of abuse, HGH and steroids.

There is a danger to anyone who abuses furosemide because it also causes the kidneys to excrete potassium along with the excess water. Low potassium levels are a danger to cardiac function and muscle function for anyone, even a well trained athlete.

genevieve
06-04-2012, 07:57 PM
Pardon me, genevieve, but as someone who has always respected your point of view here on FSU, I have to ask, are you serious? Do you not see how condescending your own question is?


1. Yes
2. I am challenging your colonial lens. This is different than condescending to entire cultures about their silly expectation that people respect the actual name of their country.

I do agree with Gil-Gilaad about Ivory Coast vs. Cote d'Ivoire, because it is a direct translation, but the Burma/Myanmar thing just smacks of Western presumption. I'm sure there are people who find it really inconvenient to learn the name Zimbabwe instead of Rhodesia as well.


The name of the country hasn't been changed. It's always been "Myanmar" in Myanmarese. Just like Bombay has always been "Mumbai" and Calcutta has always been "Kolkata".

Those who persist in using "Burma" can tell themselves they are taking some kind of a noble stance, but what they are actually doing is reinforcing the type of colonialism that went around the world changing the names of countries to suit the language they spoke.

^^ this

VALuvsMKwan
06-04-2012, 09:36 PM
So, fred, should we (including you) in the future refer to your country simply as Eire, since Ireland is an English translation/corruption of its true name and therefore colonial-sighted and condescending of those who use it? :slinkaway