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alchemy void
06-01-2012, 01:31 PM
Diet Soda haterz! :lynch:

I quit a few years ago for 3 months. Succumbed during an overnight shift and it was the best thing I've ever tasted. I drink 52 oz of Diet Mtn Dew most mornings. :P

As for the ban, its totally stupid, and as others have mentioned, makes no caloric sense. People will continue to make poor choices and continue to be obese.

MacMadame
06-01-2012, 04:01 PM
But it's a step towards telling those manufacturers that there should be acceptable limits.

No, it's just political grandstanding.

danceronice
06-01-2012, 04:05 PM
Why not a reusable bag?

For me, 1. I use the plastic bags to dispose of cat litter rather than creating a catastrophic mess by dumping it straigh in the garbage or wasting plastic and money buying special bags just for cat crap and 2. I have something like twenty reuseable bags, none of which ever make it back to the car. I don't JUST go to the grocery store, this not being 1950. I usually stop when I have the chance and am out in the right direction anyway. When some stores were doing a 5-cent or 10-cent-per-bag discount, it was worth my time to remember, now it's not. (And as for charging per plastic bag, rewards work better than punishment.)

Plastic shopping bags also work better as packing padding than peanuts or poppy paper....

RobbieB
06-01-2012, 04:13 PM
As for the ban, its totally stupid, and as others have mentioned, makes no caloric sense. People will continue to make poor choices and continue to be obese.

As others have said, if large sodas are banned then we also need to ban all other foods that are high in calories. Maybe we should work on the fast food industry...that seems like it would be more directly related to obesity.

---
Robert Bryant
Rhode Island bus charters (http://www.trailways.com/team-trailways/motorcoach-listing-companies/companies/flagship)

Prancer
06-01-2012, 06:28 PM
Diet Soda haterz! :lynch:

:lol: I can't remember the last time I got so much positive rep for a single post.


As others have said, if large sodas are banned then we also need to ban all other foods that are high in calories. Maybe we should work on the fast food industry...that seems like it would be more directly related to obesity.

I think soda probably is a major cause of obesity myself, along with other sweetened drinks like Gatorade and bottled tea and such. The number of calories that people consume in drinks is pretty ridiculous.

But half-assed measures are rather pointless.

Flatfoote
06-01-2012, 06:47 PM
I used to drink soda every day. Usually a bottle that I took two days to drink out of. Sometime or other, I just sort of started drinking more water than soda, and only have one every so often now. Yet I'm not only just as fat as I've always been, I'm even a few pounds more. So I don't think too much soda is the prime culprit.

Scintillation
06-01-2012, 06:51 PM
I've just been watching that "Weight of the Nation" series on HBO, and it has many interviews with many different dieticians and nutrition specialists who are extremely worried about how this country has compromised itself by becoming too fat. There's a lot of blame being thrown in many different directions--the companies making and marketing their unhealthy products, congress for being unwilling to step in and enforce major changes, schools for providing unhealthy food options to their students.
And when it comes to the nation's kids, I agree that they are partially responsible for the current epidemic. Parents need to take responsibility too and make sure their kids know what healthy options are, and encourage them to stay active.
But the adults in the series seemed to latch on to the idea that someone else to blame for their current state, which I think is bullsh*t. I got close to the point of type 2 diabetes and I have no one to blame but myself for it. I'm lucky because it's all still reversible but I have to change how I take care of myself. I have to make better choices, and no but me is able to make those decisions.
Anyways, I applaud Bloomberg for trying but I think he's misguided. I liked the idea of posting caloric content at all the major chain restaurants, but this soda size ban won't do much to change anything.

BlueRidge
06-01-2012, 06:51 PM
:lol: I can't remember the last time I got so much positive rep for a single post.



I think soda probably is a major cause of obesity myself, along with other sweetened drinks like Gatorade and bottled tea and such. The number of calories that people consume in drinks is pretty ridiculous.

But half-assed measures are rather pointless.

I'm wondering if the whole point of this effort isn't about the huge sodas themselves, but stirring up a lot of attention to the fact that of the massive empty calorie content of sugary drinks. A lot of people are pretty oblivious to that. It doesn't make a lot of sense otherwise, but it certainly is getting people talking about what is in sodas.

Jot the Dot Dot
06-01-2012, 07:17 PM
Sorry, but the government has no business in that department. Regulate offensive/destructive behaviour yes (such as drunk-driving, etc.). But it sounds like Mayor Bloomburg is on a Puritanism craze.

Aussie Willy
06-02-2012, 05:05 AM
There wouldn't be such a problem with plastic bags if cashiers were taught how to properly bag stuff like groceries. Can't tell you how many times I've gone through the line and have had to say "one bag, please." "One bag?" "Yes, one bag." :wall: This is for items that don't "need" to be bagged separately, like raw meats and veggies. I don't even pack my bread separately; I'm going to be eating it, not putting it up for decoration, so if it gets a bit dented, who cares? This is why I only go to the market with the self check-out if I'm getting more than 1 or 2 items, so I can pack my own, and walk out with one bag instead of the 2-3 that a cashier would typically use.

And yes, I do recycle my plastic bags. Price Chopper and Hannaford both have bins out by the front doors where people can drop off their plastic bags; every month or so I take my collection up to PC and get rid of it.
I am the same with bags too. I get very annoyed when you might have 3-4 items, one of which is laundry or washing detergent. They always put it in a separate bag. When you ask them to put in the same bag as the others they say "but it might leak". I respond that is my problem. I do like self checkout for that. :)

All my bags get used for my rubbish. Just silly to buy separate garbage bags.

As for the soda drink debate, whether you agree with the proposal or not, it does get people discussing the health implications of these things. The reality is they are not healthy. And they are not a need. Water is a need, your body can't get by without it. Soda drinks are just a want which most people would acknowledge are not good for you and can contribute to obesity. But so can a diet of eating the wrong thing. My sister eventually had lapband surgery because she ate too much crap, drank too much soda drink and got very overweight. And even after that she still eats too much crap and then complains she has stopped losing weight.

Rob
06-11-2012, 11:23 PM
Apparently, the Mayor does appreciate certain foods, as he's issued a proclamation for Doughnut Day tomorrow. (http://politicker.com/2012/05/mixed-message-with-soda-ban-and-national-donut-day-endorsements-video/)

Great wash your footlong donut down with an ounce of coke!

shan
06-12-2012, 12:02 AM
Great wash your footlong donut down with an ounce of coke!

:lol:

Prancer
06-12-2012, 01:20 AM
In a somewhat related story, Philadelphia is the site of a very different experiment--rather than banning sodas, the federal government is trying to increase the availability of healthy foods in "food deserts." But will it work?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/will-philadelphias-experiment-in-eradicating-food-deserts-work/2012/06/08/gJQAU9snNV_blog.html

vesperholly
06-12-2012, 02:46 AM
I don't know that I agree with the concept of a law, but the supersizing of drinks here is astounding. As a kid I could get a bottle of pop from a vending machine that was about 8 ounces. Maybe less.

That's really what they ought to crack down on, rather than the drink itself. When I lost 80 lbs on Weight Watchers, I had a can of Pepsi every day.

I also think it goes back to parents/educators really emphasizing healthy eating. My parents were pretty good at feeding us healthy stuff most of the time, so I grew up with it. Though I'm obese according to BMI (regained after thyroid disease), I don't have any "fat" medical issues like high blood pressure or cholesterol, and I think it's because I still eat fairly healthy. Not enough movement and too much cheese and pasta sometimes :shuffle:

Unfortunately healthy eating runs directly counter to the food industry's moneymaking interests. I don't think a 44oz drink exists because consumers asked for it. They're just as powerful as Big Pharma.


I like the required calorie listings at restaurants. I've been quite surprised at some of them, and it definitely has influenced my choice.

Agreed. There's a local Panera-style cafe that does that, and I definitely :eek: and had the fruit salad instead of the baked potato soup when I went there!

Honestly, I wish they'd work on making healthy food more affordable. Eating fresh fruit, vegetables and meat is incredibly expensive and a PITA. The Philly "food desert" experiment sounds interesting, I hope it works.

milanessa
06-12-2012, 03:49 AM
That's really what they ought to crack down on, rather than the drink itself.


Isn't that what they're doing with this law?