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taf2002
06-17-2012, 08:47 PM
I think one result from this thread is that I will be more aware of what high frutose corn syrup there is in stuff I buy & try to choose more wisely.

snoopy
06-17-2012, 09:04 PM
And for yet others, they may be eating a very different diet that what their community is accustomed to (this is prevalent in Native communities and presumed to be one of the reasons why not only obesity is epidemic throughout Indian Country, but also cancers like esophageal are disproportionately.

This is essentially the theory behind low carb / paleo diets. The standard American diet heavy in processed foods is not how most of our forebears ate, so our bodies don't react well to it - leading to things like obesity and type 2 diabetes.

For me, I can eat a lot of my own cooking (based on the perimeter of the grocery store foods) and not gain weight. I start cutting corners with the lean cuisines and forget about it.

kwanfan1818
06-17-2012, 09:20 PM
Except for a lot of women, when they start to go through puberty, their bodies change and eating a normal amount of food doesn't satisfy you. It hasn't been studied that much but what seems to happen is that the body's "full" signal kind of shuts off. This causes the girls to chunk up so they are 10-30 pounds overweight. It's probably some ancient survival mechanism.

Sadly, not so ancient: there are plenty of malnourished women today for whom having children is an huge caloric burden. From an evolutionary point of view, women gain weight during puberty to create and store the fat, primarily in the hips and butt, that is used for fetal brain growth.

I was shocked to read about a study that charted the eye movements of men who were shown a series of photos of naked women of all shapes, sizes, and race, and the overwhelming majority first looked at the waist, not breasts. The waist-to-hip ratio tells a man whether the woman has the "right" fat to bear his children and whether it's more likely that she already has children, an evolutionary downer meaning more shared resources, rather than, "proof she can already do it."


Re calories on stuff: At first it makes you think, especially if you've been buying food you think is a healthier choice at a restaurant, and realize the "non-healthy" option actually has less calories. Then, like anything else, you get used to it, and you just don't "see" it anymore or it doesn't bother you. NY has had lables for quite a while. Haven't seen a lot of fast food closures as a result. Generally, people know it's bad for you. You eat it because you want it, just like any other bad habit.

I've been noticing from commercials the trend from super-sizing the individual components to having smaller, cheaper mix-and-match components or meals consisting of them. I'm not sure if this trend is purely economic or whether they're banking that people won't be able to do the math on the calories for mini-burger x 2 + a mini chicken nuggets vs. "This mega-burger has 1500 calories alone."

Another thing I noticed was that McDonald's here keeps messaging "100% Canadian beef."

When I read about the new law, I thought of the pre-Starbucks tall/grande/venti "Seinfeld" episode where Elaine tries to order a small (or medium) soda at the movies, and it's like the Abbott and Costello "Who's on First?" routine.

About advice, I don't think that having or having had a disorder disqualifies a person from offering good or important advice, or there would be no such thing as 12-step programs or FSU. I think it depends on the advice.

ETA:

The French Are Getting Fatter, Too (http://www.npr.org/2011/08/06/139042221/the-french-are-getting-fatter-too)

:shuffle:

And French Women Do Get Fat (http://www.thatsfit.com/2009/11/11/french-women-do-get-fat/)
In both articles, the chief culprits are a change in diet, less walking, and change in eating habits, and the NPR article also cites a rise especially among immigrants and the poor, who are often the same. The French eating patterns were based on a fairly strict 4x day, with one late afternoon snack to carry over until a late meal by North American standards, a long sit-down dinner, and lots of water.

The only detriment I've read about the traditional French diet is that walking as exercise was key to counterbalancing it to a small but important extent, and walking has become less integrated into day-to-day life.

barbk
06-17-2012, 10:28 PM
I love the restaurant calorie counts California requires. I wish that was nationwide. (If these chain restaurants can do it for California, it shouldn't cost too much to do it for the rest of the country.)

I've also found that the senior specials -- especially for breakfast -- are often much lower in calories, in part because they reduce the portion size. Mr. Barbk got an omelette when we were out there -- it was ostensibly three eggs, but having made enough omelettes in my life I'd guess it had four, maybe five eggs, along with a good cup and a half of home fries. And an obscenely large biscuit. I would guess that when all was said and done, his breakfast incorporated a good 1600 calories. Maybe more.

MacMadame
06-17-2012, 11:38 PM
I'd guess so too. :)

I often order from the "Senior" menu. Or the children's menu if it has reasonable options. It's not that I'm trying to be cheap. It's just that sometimes I don't want to deal with leftovers especially if it's something that doesn't "leftover" well.

Speaking of huge portion sizes: for Father's Day we all went to Outback for lunch. MacBoy and I split a BBQ Mixed Grill plate. It had shrimp, chicken & ribs on it along with French fries. We ended up leaving most of the French fries there and bringing home half the chicken, half the ribs, and one of the coconut shrimp.

So a meal sold as for one person fed two of us with enough leftovers for another meal. I suspect bigger eaters than MacBoy and I wouldn't have had any leftovers. But most people should be able to easily split that meal and be fully satisfied. Then I hear that Applebee's commercial where they say things like "share an appetizer?!" as if that's the most insane idea ever and I just shake my head over how warped our ideas of what a meal is have become.

michiruwater
06-18-2012, 12:50 AM
The commercial is for Golden Corral, actually, making of the fact that Applebee's 2 for 20 deal makes you - gasp! - share an appetizer. It blows my mind, too. Applebees has made sure to have some healthy options (and not just one sort of 'healthy) for years, so even though I think a lot of their food isn't great, I'd eat there before a lot of other places.

McDonalds is a marketing genius above all other things, and the company has noticed the push for more locally-oriented food, which is why it does not surprised me that they would advertise 100% Canadian Beef. A bunch of billboards in MI advertise that they're using Michigan eggs in their breakfast sandwiches now.

cruisin
06-18-2012, 01:19 AM
Last post on this, but yes. Narcissism has been shown to be correlated with eating disorders for some time (meaning, those with underlying narcissism can manifest that through eating disorders). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17080446

The narcissistically abused style (poor me defense) often seeks to elicit sympathy in order to maintain attention on the sufferer through their disordered eating. IOW, you may think you're expressing sympathy for the eating disorder, but in reality you're feeding the underlying narcissistic disorder which is what is fueling the disordered eating. And with that I'll leave it alone.

Just my .02

Which is worth nothing. I'm sure you can find bull shit articles to support your own need to be right all of the time. But, the fact is, you don't know what you're talking about. Eating disorders are addictions. Eating disorders are not just anorexia and bulimia, it includes overeating/obesity. So, are you calling every overweight person on this board a narcissist?

And your selective editing of my posts is really manipulative and self serving on your part.

I am truly disappointed in you as a person.


IOW, your post was an insult...calling someone narcissistic to their faces is rude. And since I doubt you know her in RL, it really isn't appropriate to psychoanalyze her, even if you were qualified to do so.

Thank you.

vesperholly
06-18-2012, 04:01 AM
It's the same with most of the obese. There is something going on with their bodies that isn't going on with the non-obese. It's not just about making poor choices and causing the obesity. In fact, it seems pretty obvious from the science that the stuff that causes obesity causes the poor choices.

Of course, seeing obese people make poor choices just reinforces the idea that they brought all this on themselves and all they have to do is stop making those choices (or never have made them in the first place), but we know from looking at the science that being obese not just a behavioral issue.


When we focus on the faults of others: they need more control, they need more exercise, they need to put more of these items in the diet, your diet plan is all wrong, etc. we are unable to address the real problem.

:cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2:

I have experienced high metabolism, caused by an insanely overactive thyroid. I lost weight while not paying any attention to what I ate bagels, pasta, bread, whatever. I couldn't exercise because my heart would race and I would get nauseous and dizzy (the condition was undiagnosed at this time). And I still lost weight, almost 40 pounds from February to June.

agalisgv
06-18-2012, 04:24 AM
So, are you calling every overweight person on this board a narcissist? No, just you.

And lol that you cut out half my post to make it sound like the my .02 was referring to you rather than the topic at hand. But to then say:
And your selective editing of my posts is really manipulative and self serving on your part. is real chutzpah on your part :lol:.

So let me make it plain. You invade thread after thread, year after year, educating everyone about your bloody eating disorders and dispensing advice like you're some Dear Abby on the subject. You're not.

You have an eating disorder as well other issues. Get help, and stop using any excuse you can to dominate threads with your fecking eating issues.


Thank you. You're welcome

cruisin
06-18-2012, 05:22 AM
No, just you.

And lol that you cut out half my post to make it sound like the my .02 was referring to you rather than the topic at hand. But to then say: is real chutzpah on your part :lol:.

So let me make it plain. You invade thread after thread, year after year, educating everyone about your bloody eating disorders and dispensing advice like you're some Dear Abby on the subject. You're not.

You have an eating disorder as well other issues. Get help, and stop using any excuse you can to dominate threads with your fecking eating issues.

You're welcome

I had no idea you were so bitter and nasty. Why don't you get some help, you clearly have your own set of issues.

And the thank you was not for you. But, then, you knew that didn't you.

Prancer
06-18-2012, 05:24 AM
All right, ladies, that's enough. If you want to discuss one another's personal deficiencies, take it to PM if you must.

manhn
06-19-2012, 12:12 AM
Re calories on stuff: At first it makes you think, especially if you've been buying food you think is a healthier choice at a restaurant, and realize the "non-healthy" option actually has less calories. Then, like anything else, you get used to it, and you just don't "see" it anymore or it doesn't bother you. NY has had lables for quite a while. Haven't seen a lot of fast food closures as a result. Generally, people know it's bad for you. You eat it because you want it, just like any other bad habit.



I do appreciate the information nonetheless. On my way to the Oregon Coast this weekend (which, BTW, is so beautiful!), I stopped by a place called Jersey Mike's Subs (so many American chain fast food places I have never heard of before). They had the calories for each sandwich, which I think is great. I wish Canada would follow suit tout de suite. Originally, I was gonna get a veggie sub but then ordered the turkey and provolone when I found out that the veggie sub was actually higher in calories.

This place, like most fast food places, had refillable drinks where you go back to the pop station to fill your cup for free. So, even with the limits placed by the NYC govt, you can drink as much as pop as you wish. You just have to walk a bit more.

cruisin
06-19-2012, 12:33 AM
Is Jersey Mike's like a Subway or Quiznos? :lol: I live in NJ and I've never heard of Jersey Mike's. I think it's great that they list nutritional values. I went to their web page, to check it out and the nutritional values are listed there, as well. The only thing you have to do is notice that the nutrition values, for cold subs, do not include the values for oil & vinegar or mayo. It's a bit misleading, but it's a start.

numbers123
06-19-2012, 01:10 AM
Most listed calories on fast food menus are the without any condiments. That's where people get fooled.

cruisin
06-19-2012, 01:26 AM
Most listed calories on fast food menus are the without any condiments. That's where people get fooled.

Yes, it's the whole salads are diet food thing. Raw vegetables are good for you and fairly low in calories. The chicken on top is also fine (as long as it's not breaded and fried). But, the shredded cheese and globs of dressing is where people get into trouble.

Wasn't it subway that had the ad campaign with the very overweight guy who lost lots of weight eating nothing but subs? I just can't figure that out, subs don't seem the best choice.