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agalisgv
06-16-2012, 06:49 PM
You can get a large soda -- one large enough to qualify for this ban -- for about $1.75. Cheaper some places. A big gulp from 7-eleven (32 oz) costs less than a dollar--$.89.

A super big gulp (64 oz) costs about $1.17.

judiz
06-16-2012, 07:00 PM
Ban won't work without education. I teach Pre-K and I try to teach my students healthy eating habits. Morning snack has to be healthy, even if mommy did pack 3 packs of fruit snacks or 2 fruit rollups in your lunchbox, they do not count as fruit. No chocolate cookies or chips in the morning either. You don't want to know how many of my students have already had multiple cavities.

snoopy
06-16-2012, 07:18 PM
Isn't Taubes contention though that modern wheat and sugar mess with metabolism? Or is he one who says it is actually genetics?

Similar to what has been posted, I have read articles that carbs and fat stimulate the reward centers in our brains and they do have an addictive quality. If you are not one who gets that rush of addiction, you probably don't understand why portion and choice control are harder for some people. Further, not only is bad food cheaper, it is everywhere. It is easier to avoid alcohol for an alcoholic than a carb addict to avoid a donut or a bagel. Better choices can be made but it does require conquering both physiology AND culture.

Somewhat related, I don't drink and in social occasions, it never ceases to amaze me how many people are offended that I don't drink. I was just out with friends and one of them said I HAD to have an alcoholic beverage. The whole table stared at me for 30 seconds waiting for me to capitulate. I have been in same situations over the gosh darn birthday cake. The pressure to conform doesn't go away in adulthood.

MacMadame
06-16-2012, 07:20 PM
A big gulp from 7-eleven (32 oz) costs less than a dollar--$.89.

A super big gulp (64 oz) costs about $1.17.
Well there you go. (I don't drink soda so I was going by memory. :lol:)


We have been told forever that being overweight is a matter of personal choices and/or a lack of willpower. But science has shown over and over that this is mostly not true. There have been many, many studies showing that bodies have a set point that they fight to keep at and that dieting, in people who are genetically prone to obesity, actually causes weight GAIN because it causes the body to raise that set point.

It might make someone who has never had a big problem with being obese feel better to think they are somehow morally superior to those who do. But it's not going to help us solve this problem because it's not accurate.

To solve a problem, you have to understand it. That means understanding what part is played by environment, what part by genetics, what by behavior, and what actions can truly combat it vs. just make us feel good. This ban on large sodas by the mayor of NYC is a feel-good measure that is not going to solve the problem. OTOH, measures like putting the calories on menus has been shown to change people's behaviors -- both individuals and the food industry. That sort of measure has caused some restaurants to change how their foods are prepared or to make portions smaller and it's caused patrons to make different food choices as well.

I am not against the government getting even more involved in what we eat. But, if they are going to make laws about it, I want them to be good ones that actually help. Not stupid ones like this law.

leesaleesa
06-16-2012, 07:57 PM
Originally Posted by leesaleesa
The topic was obesity, and I addressed my particular situation and how I am able to to avoid obesity through diet and excercise.

Well, no. The claim you made was you can eat a wholesome meal on less than what a fast food meal costs. I pointed out that fast food meal costs less than $1. You went on saying you can eat for close to that, but basically by bumming food off of others.


Wow, you got me. My $1.15 breakfast IS less than your .99 cent junk food meal, but I suspect you didn't factor the tax in. I would be willing to send you the difference. So to save a whopping ten cents per day, a person is forced into eating the junk food breakfast. Sorry, you can put a leash on that dog cause it don't hunt.

I am pretty excited that I scored TWO free apples without even begging this week, and am kicking around the idea of urban foraging. You can sit and condescend all day, but I'm still eating healthful foods on a modest budget. I have been invited to a Gala this weekend, and intend to show up with tupperware containers for the leftovers that would end up in the garbage.

Do you also consider people who get food stamp assistance as "scrounging off of others"? That's some damn high and mighty air you're breathing up there. Only a fool wouldn't take perfectly good food that was being trashed, anyway.

If you're anywhere near Miami, I'm getting some free Curry with Roti and home made chutney this coming week. Should make three meals, but I would share. :D

barbk
06-16-2012, 08:10 PM
Isn't Taubes contention though that modern wheat and sugar mess with metabolism? Or is he one who says it is actually genetics?

Similar to what has been posted, I have read articles that carbs and fat stimulate the reward centers in our brains and they do have an addictive quality. If you are not one who gets that rush of addiction, you probably don't understand why portion and choice control are harder for some people. Further, not only is bad food cheaper, it is everywhere. It is easier to avoid alcohol for an alcoholic than a carb addict to avoid a donut or a bagel. Better choices can be made but it does require conquering both physiology AND culture.

Somewhat related, I don't drink and in social occasions, it never ceases to amaze me how many people are offended that I don't drink. I was just out with friends and one of them said I HAD to have an alcoholic beverage. The whole table stared at me for 30 seconds waiting for me to capitulate. I have been in same situations over the gosh darn birthday cake. The pressure to conform doesn't go away in adulthood.

Taubes says it is metabolic & genetic, mediated by whether or not someone has already hit the tipping point of insulin resistance. The studies he references seem to show that fructose is perhaps more deleterious than sucrose, but he'd certainly advocate less (much, much less) of both for people who are insulin resistant. He notes that the tolerance for carbohydrates is tremendously variable person to person, and even after weight loss, the amount of carbs that one individual can tolerate without weight gain can be very different than what another can tolerate.

I also hate the pressure. As somebody who quite literally needs a nap after two drinks, I don't like the continued pressure to have some more. I've given up on the dinner front though -- I just let the insistent host pour, and then I don't drink the wine.

vesperholly
06-16-2012, 08:11 PM
I have been invited to a Gala this weekend, and intend to show up with tupperware containers for the leftovers that would end up in the garbage.

WTF? Who does this?

cruisin
06-16-2012, 08:19 PM
If you are not one who gets that rush of addiction, you probably don't understand why portion and choice control are harder for some people.



It might make someone who has never had a big problem with being obese feel better to think they are somehow morally superior to those who do. But it's not going to help us solve this problem because it's not accurate.

I have posted about my food issues many times. I was obese as a child and teenager. I dealt with many years of eating disorders. I am well aware of how difficult it is and how much genetics plays into weight. But, we are talking about health here. And food choices do effect out health. And portion and choices do effect our weight. Some may have very fast metabolisms, some very slow. It sucks to watch a person scarf down lots of food and stay skinny, while you eat lettuce and fat free yoghurt and are heavier. But, we do have some control. My body wants to be much heavier, I fight it every day. I win because I am in total control. I am not superior, I hate that I can't have a piece of cake at someone's birthday. I hate that I make pasta for my family and don't get to eat any of it. But, I make a choice to stay thin. That doesn't make me special, it makes me neurotic :lol:.

But, we are off track. Banning large sized soft drinks will not cure obesity. Education will help. Better choices will help. Exercise will help. We may not become stick thin, but we do have some control.

I also understand the alcoholic/vs/food addiction example. It is much harder to stay away from alcohol than food. Plus, you can't go cold turkey with food, like you can with alcohol.

purple skates
06-16-2012, 08:21 PM
WTF? Who does this?

You'd be surprised. One of my co-workers does it all the time.

cruisin
06-16-2012, 08:21 PM
WTF? Who does this?

I don't know! :scream:

Though I must admit that my Italian grandmother and great aunts would fill up their purses with treats at the Viennese Table at weddings. It would mortify me :lol:

leesaleesa
06-16-2012, 08:24 PM
WTF? Who does this?

Reading is fundamental. It is obvious that I do. If it makes you feel any less outraged, the Gala is being held by a friend who insists on loading everyone down with leftovers.

snoopy
06-16-2012, 08:43 PM
Reading is fundamental. It is obvious that I do. If it makes you feel any less outraged, the Gala is being held by a friend who insists on loading everyone down with leftovers.

I can see the resourcefulness in scamming free food. I just don't think you can really expect everyone to do this successfully, as part of a regular budget and diet plan.

vesperholly
06-16-2012, 08:55 PM
the Gala is being held by a friend who insists on loading everyone down with leftovers.

It's one thing if the host is known for encouraging leftovers. But the word "gala" to me implies a classier situation, and one where a doggie bag (much less TUPPERWARE :lol: :rolleyes:) would not be appropriate. It just seems tacky, and not something a person would do unless they're completely impoverished.

agalisgv
06-16-2012, 09:04 PM
Well, I go to church potlucks all the time (we sometimes have them several times a week). There are always leftovers, and they are freely handed out to everyone there. But I can't imagine coming to such an event with tupperware *expecting* to take food afterwards--especially if one hasn't brought something in the first place.

More than a tad rude and presumptuous IMO....

snoopy
06-16-2012, 09:10 PM
Well I look at it like this, not only is she providing free food for herself but free entertainment for others. It's a win-win for everyone.