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barbk
06-15-2012, 07:05 PM
We've got a fabulous farmer's market, and the produce does seem to all come from within the state. Unfortunately, the produce prices really are pretty high. I do like it for weird stuff -- like the nice Asian ladies who sell cilantro complete with the root, which I use is a Thai dish, or some lovely heirloom tomatoes.

You can buy fresh artisan breads, local cheeses, honey, jams & jellies, and frozen local meats at ours, but it stretches for a good way and has an arm that sticks out with prepared food vendors.

I had a half share of a CSA two years ago, and the reality was that everything was either in huge abundance or virtual scarcity week to week, which made using it difficult. (Plus way too much kale. Way too much.)

purple skates
06-15-2012, 07:06 PM
Isn't Ypsilanti in Michigan? Just goes to show....something. ;)

Ypsi marches to the beat of its own drummer. :lol:


Seriously, why do so many markets have so much space taken up with crafts and such?

Because the crafts sell.

Southpaw
06-15-2012, 07:08 PM
Seriously, why do so many markets have so much space taken up with crafts and such? Anyone have any idea?

I would imagine, like flea markets, the vendors have to buy their tables in order to hustle their wares. There are probably more crap hawkers than produce vendors willing to pony up the cash for a table. A sold table is better than an empty one.

milanessa
06-15-2012, 07:16 PM
Seriously, why do so many markets have so much space taken up with crafts and such? Anyone have any idea? To me that is not at all the intent of a farmers market...

Because farmer's markets have often changed into combination markets. Unless the people running them have strict regs on what can be sold then anyone applying for a spot gets it. The organizers get paid based on how many vendors are there.

vesperholly
06-15-2012, 07:57 PM
I read these threads and I understand that some healthy food is more expensive. But, there is no way I can believe that a carrot is more expensive than a bag of chips.

Have you tasted carrots lately? They've got nothing on chips, pop, or all the other crap that's out there. And I say this as someone who eats quite a bit of veggies. People eat unhealthily in part because it tastes good. I'm wondering if science will find out down the road that those unhealthy foods are addictive in some way.

Also, if I buy a carrot, what do I do with it? Eat it raw? I suppose if it were baby carrots. But most vegetables require cooking and/or preparation of some sort. Would you just eat a tomato like an apple? If those kitchen utensils aren't available to you, what do you eat? Do you just blame the person for not adequately preparing food for the day? It's always their fault in the end, right? :rolleyes:

Personally, I have a hard time expanding my cooking past the recipes I know I'll like - and I know I could be doing better. But I cannot afford to spend $30 in food for a new recipe only to find out it tastes like crap.

michiruwater
06-15-2012, 08:07 PM
Would you just eat a tomato like an apple?
Is this not something that other people do? :shuffle:


Ypsi marches to the beat of its own drummer. :lol:

A truer statement has never been said :lol: It was such a weird place to live. I don't think I'll miss it, to be honest, though Ann Arbor was nice.

Ann Arbor (and I don't know if this is recent or not) has a separate crafts market now at times or on days of the week other than when the farmer's market is there. I did notice, when I went to A2's farmer's market, that it was more expensive than Ypsi's, which confused me because I felt like... wouldn't the same vendors go to both places? But Ypsi's is (way, way, way, WAY) smaller, so maybe I just can't find the cheaper ones at A2's. Ann Arbor's market actually overwhelmed the hell out of me and I only went to it once or twice.

PDilemma
06-15-2012, 08:21 PM
Also, if I buy a carrot, what do I do with it? Eat it raw?

Yes. You just need to peel it.


Would you just eat a tomato like an apple?

I have. But I prefer to slice it and put pepper on it.


If those kitchen utensils aren't available to you, what do you eat?

All that's required here is a paring knife. Not incredibly expensive. A vegetable peeler would make peeling a carrot easier, but it is not impossible without it. I'm not understanding your point. Do you really think these vegetables can't be eaten raw or that utensils like knives are that expensive? If you think they must be cooked, unless people are actually homeless, they should have access to a stove. And even small microwaves are not that expensive anymore.


Personally, I have a hard time expanding my cooking past the recipes I know I'll like - and I know I could be doing better. But I cannot afford to spend $30 in food for a new recipe only to find out it tastes like crap.


If you already cook, then you should have an idea of what spices, tastes and combinations appeal to you. That's a starting point for looking for other recipes.

As for how people eat, the problem of food deserts is an issue. There are so many places where fresh food is not easily available. Even farmers markets (if they do have fresh foodstuffs) are not easily accessible--they are in affluent city centers or distant suburban areas in my experience.

milanessa
06-15-2012, 08:23 PM
Is this not something that other people do? :shuffle:


Probably not in public. It also emphasizes the difference between feeding yourself and feeding a family.

Prancer
06-15-2012, 08:26 PM
Is this not something that other people do? :shuffle:

Too drippy.


I did notice, when I went to A2's farmer's market, that it was more expensive than Ypsi's, which confused me because I felt like... wouldn't the same vendors go to both places?

Probably, but booths costs a lot more in some places than in others.

For example, there's a farmer's market here on Saturdays that is set up in a K-mart parking lot. The farmers bring their own tables and such, and K-mart charges them a nominal fee for the space. Produce is pretty cheap there, although not as cheap as a grocery store.

But we have a permanent, year-round, indoor farmer's market that has little restaurants, a big eating area with live music, and non-produce booths like fresh flowers and organic products, and booth space there is very expensive, so that cost is passed on.

michiruwater
06-15-2012, 08:33 PM
Probably not in public. It also emphasizes the difference between feeding yourself and feeding a family.

How?

I mean, I am not under any delusions that I am spending the normal amount that most people spend per person in a family, but I just don't understand how my (life-long) desire to eat a whole tomato by myself emphasizes that particular difference. I really don't think I will stop eating whole tomatoes if I ever decide to have a family.

genevieve
06-15-2012, 08:39 PM
Also, if I buy a carrot, what do I do with it? Eat it raw?


Yes. You just need to peel it.
I don't even peel carrots, I just wash them


Would you just eat a tomato like an apple?


Is this not something that other people do? :shuffle:

I don't like raw tomatoes, so I don't eat them, but I have seen people just pop cherry tomatoes in their mouths. Less messy than eating a whole tomato.

One of my coworkers eats green peppers like eating an apple - I thought that was really funny the first time I saw it, but why not?

The farmer's market in my neighborhood is a bit spendy, because Seattle (and especially my neighborhood) has a reputation for local food culture. I'm not sure where there might be cheaper farmer's markets in the city, although last year there were several fruit sellers who just showed up randomly on corners selling strawberries. I bet they aren't paying anyone a fee to stand there so the prices are probably lower :lol:

As to the soda ban - I think there is absolutely no need for gallons of soda to be sold, but the fact that this is only targeting non-diet sodas makes it just ridiculous.

Andrushka
06-15-2012, 08:41 PM
Fruit Juices and flavored milks have just as much or more sugar than soda does. Most of that stuff is not good for you but I don't think the government should have the right to now control what people can and cannot buy to eat or drink. There are bigger fish to fry than that.Instead why not educate people about what is in their food or make good foods less expensive. My kids and I eat quite healthy 98% of the time...it's not cheap.But I'd rather put in a little extra $ for healthy food than pay doctors.

fyi Diet sodas are really not good for you.Aside from tasting horrible. :)

PDilemma
06-15-2012, 08:44 PM
How?

I mean, I am not under any delusions that I am spending the normal amount that most people spend per person in a family, but I just don't understand how my (life-long) desire to eat a whole tomato by myself emphasizes that particular difference. I really don't think I will stop eating whole tomatoes if I ever decide to have a family.

Agreed. My mother used to let us eat whole tomatoes out of the garden. Last time I checked, we were a family of four when I was growing up. Plus one cat, who oddly enough ate tomatoes if the bucket was left where he could get to it.

numbers123
06-15-2012, 08:46 PM
You can not regulate foods or sodas or lattes to be only sold in specific amounts. One simply buys another one.

As I had it explained to me by a dietitian - our bodies crave salt, sugar and fat as part of a survival mode.
This affinity for fat is not by chance, it is part of our genetic make up. When we eat fat we release chemicals in our brains that actually.
These chemicals were important in the evolutionary history of mammals. Fats are crucial to survival, and they were once hard to come by in the mammalian diet.
Why do we crave Salt? Your body consists of over 60% water. Salt is one of the electrolytes that helps your body maintain an appropriate balance of fluids.
Sugars: Carbohydrates stimulate the release of the feel-good brain chemical serotonin. Sugar is a carbohydrate. The taste of sugar also releases endorphins that calm and relax us, and offer a natural "high,"
Processed flour, sugar etc. have its roots in extending shelf life:
Modern supermarkets would not exist without modern food processing techniques. Processed foods are usually less susceptible to early spoilage than fresh foods and are better suited for long distance transportation from the source to the consumer. When they were first introduced, some processed foods helped to alleviate food shortages and improved the overall nutrition of populations as it made many new foods available to the masses.

Decreasing the amount of processed sugar, flour etc. increases the cost of food as it's shelf life is shorter and results in more waste. I love fresh veggies and fruits, but another of the factors in a high cost is the cost of transporting the items to your store. If we only ate fruits and veggies that could be grown locally, the variety of foods would be significantly different. How many of us could have oranges year round or even oranges at all, kiwi, pineapples, etc.
Between hard wiring of the human body, the consumer's desire for mega supermarkets, the lack of variety of your local grown items (not that there isn't variety, but many of us have become accustomed to food items that are not suitable for growing in our areas) - Yes, having a diet with more healthy options is more costly.

ETA: feeding one's self and feeding a family means that you have to make that food budget go farther. You may still want to eat that whole tomato, but you are probably have the same income, so the grocery budget of one now has to feed 2 or more people. Which means that one tomato has to be divided between 2 or more people.

milanessa
06-15-2012, 08:51 PM
How?

I mean, I am not under any delusions that I am spending the normal amount that most people spend per person in a family, but I just don't understand how my (life-long) desire to eat a whole tomato by myself emphasizes that particular difference. I really don't think I will stop eating whole tomatoes if I ever decide to have a family.

You can eat whole tomatoes all you want - I do; the point is that it's not something you hand your kids and say here's dinner. I'm not speaking to money but most of the posters here espousing eating healthy and pushing vegetables can please themselves and not worry about another adult and a couple of kids in the process. More to say but I'm already 2 hours late leaving to go to my mother's house. More later.