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View Full Version : The History of Synchro. Team name's



FSWer
05-31-2012, 02:16 AM
Say,'ve ben wondering about that. We know that a lot of Teams are named after their Club...(such as the Haydenettes). But what about the ones that aren't? Such as Team De-Sol,etc.? Does anyone know?

Sylvia
05-31-2012, 02:24 AM
http://www.teamdelsol.org/history.shtml

San Diego’s four "Team del Sol" synchronized skating teams (senior, teen, juvenile, adult) are based in San Diego, one of Southern California’s most popular vacation destinations. ... Formerly known as the Icettes (senior/junior), Sun Blazers (novice/intermediate), and Starlites (juvenile), our teams changed their name to Team del Sol in 1997 to reflect San Diego’s Spanish heritage. Team del Sol translates from Spanish to "Team of the Sun."

crzesk8dad
05-31-2012, 02:33 AM
The "Ice'Kateers" derived their name from the team's training facility, originally owned by the Walt Disney Co. and then named Disney Ice (they also owned the Mighty Ducks NHL team and the Anaheim Angels...yes Anaheim, not LA..baseball team, at the time). It was a take off from the old Mickey Mouse Club, Mousekateers.

The rink is also 2 miles north of "the Happiest Place on Earth." (That's Disneyland, not Fry's Electronics for you Southern California computer nerds...Fry's is three miles the other way :lol:).

The team still trains at the same facility, but it is now called "The Rinks/Anaheim Ice" and it continues to be part of the NHL Anaheim Ducks organization, which is no longer owned by Disney, but by a private investor group. The Ducks control/own several ice and dry rinks in the OC area.

The Ice'Kateers represents the Glacier Falls Figure Skating Club, in US Figure Skating competitions, and has several ISI teams as well.

FSWer
05-31-2012, 02:38 AM
http://www.teamdelsol.org/history.shtml

I'm not following.

overedge
05-31-2012, 05:18 AM
Sylvia's post has the quote from the linked website that explains the team's name. What are you not following?

Yazmeen
05-31-2012, 06:23 PM
FSWer: Team del Sol is Spanish for "Team of the Sun." San Diego is a sunny California city with a strong Spanish history, so the teams decided to change their old names and use Team del Sol to reflect their San Diego location and history.

And the use of "ette" in team names (Haydenettes, Crystalletes, etc.) is simply an old feminine term that meant that when they were formed, the teams were all girls. This goes beyond skating; for example, there is a college in Texas called Kilgore College, and their men's football team is the Kilgore College Rangers. In 1939, their director wanted to attract women to the college (not as many women went to college back then as now) so they created the Kilgore College Rangerettes dancing drill team to perform at halftime. These teams became very famous, I remember watching them perform at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and other events on TV, they were a big deal when I was young. Another use of "ette" in a name that represents a girl's group.

I've often wondered if a male skater joined, how he'd feel being called a "Haydenette!!!"

DORISPULASKI
06-01-2012, 03:10 PM
This page from the official website for the world synchro championships has links to information pages for each of the competing teams. Mostly they don't tell you about their names.


http://iof2.idrottonline.se/SvenskaKonstakningsforbundet/TeamVM2012/SynchronizedSkating/TeamUSA2/

I always wondered why a team from Sweden picked Team Boomerang ;)

And why Team Zoulous for team France. (in English, Zulus)

The Haydenettes are named after their ice rink.

http://www.jwhayden.org/

which is named for Josiah Willard Hayden.

madm
06-02-2012, 07:00 AM
Also of interest is the name change of this sport. It used to be called "precision skating" back when my oldest daughter did it (about 15 years ago). According to Wikipedia, " In the early days, precision skating (as it was then called) resembled a drill team (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_team) routine, or a precision dance (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Precision_dance&action=edit&redlink=1) company such as The Rockettes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rockettes)." Angelfire states that "Precision skating" started out as being something merely to entertain spectators between periods at U of Michigan hockey games." The first team was The Hockettes from Ann Arbor.

The ISU recognized precision skating as an official discipline of skating in 1994. The sport's name changed to "synchronized skating" in 1998 because this name was understood better internationally. For more history, see:

http://www.angelfire.com/il2/figskating/branches/synchrohistory.html

I've been wondering for a long time why synchronized skating hasn't become an Olympic sport. Anyone know why? After all, synchronized swimming is. It would be a big drain on resources though to field synchro teams with so many competitors!

luna_skater
06-02-2012, 08:40 PM
I've been wondering for a long time why synchronized skating hasn't become an Olympic sport. Anyone know why? After all, synchronized swimming is. It would be a big drain on resources though to field synchro teams with so many competitors!

Mostly because of logistics. If you have 20 teams competing, you aren't just adding 20 athletes to the Olympic village...you're adding 400 athletes (plus coaches, trainers, etc.).

Other issues that have been discussed in the past:

Men and women compete against each other
For a number of years, the rules were changing constantly
Not enough competing nations
Not enough *competitive* competing nations (the sport has traditionally been dominated by just a few countries)


It's also not well-known outside the skating community. If synchro was on TV and became lucrative through a large fan base, I'm sure the IOC would be making much more of an effort to include synchro in the games. It's a difficult sport to film and present on TV...I've never seen a broadcast that truly captures the excitement and athleticism that you see at a live event. TV doesn't translate the "experience" well.

FSWer
06-03-2012, 01:53 AM
Also of interest is the name change of this sport. It used to be called "precision skating" back when my oldest daughter did it (about 15 years ago). According to Wikipedia, " In the early days, precision skating (as it was then called) resembled a drill team (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_team) routine, or a precision dance (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Precision_dance&action=edit&redlink=1) company such as The Rockettes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rockettes)." Angelfire states that "Precision skating" started out as being something merely to entertain spectators between periods at U of Michigan hockey games." The first team was The Hockettes from Ann Arbor.

The ISU recognized precision skating as an official discipline of skating in 1994. The sport's name changed to "synchronized skating" in 1998 because this name was understood better internationally. For more history, see:

http://www.angelfire.com/il2/figskating/branches/synchrohistory.html

I've been wondering for a long time why synchronized skating hasn't become an Olympic sport. Anyone know why? After all, synchronized swimming is. It would be a big drain on resources though to field synchro teams with so many competitors!

LOL,because a Line kind of represents a Drill Team,right? BTW....do any of the other moves in Synchro. (a Block,Intersection,etc. have a History?