PDA

View Full Version : First Trip to Paris - Please Advise!



Pages : [1] 2 3

Nomad
05-22-2012, 05:56 AM
I'm going to Paris for the first time and would like some advice on lesser-known attractions not to be missed. I will be there for the first two weeks of June and have rented a studio apartment in the Marais, within walking distance of the Seine. Restaurants, shops (cool clothes for teen nieces?), museums, bookstores, all recommendations welcome. Merci beaucoup.

genevieve
05-22-2012, 07:09 AM
Marais is awesome, but take the teens (and yourself) to the Rue Mouffetard in the Latin Quarter.

have a great time! :cheer2:

Nomad
05-22-2012, 07:14 AM
Thanks, Genevieve. The nieces aren't coming, however. Early June is swim season, so they've now turned down Venice, Mexico, and Paris. Silly bints. But I want to buy them cool souvenirs anyway.

morqet
05-22-2012, 10:41 AM
Le Relais de Venise (http://www.relaisdevenise.com/) in Porte-Maillot for the best chips in Paris. It gets very busy though!

jl22aries
05-22-2012, 11:04 AM
Laduree (their macarons! the raspberry passionfruit tartelettes!): http://laduree.fr/
Though there are so many amazing patisseries in Paris, prepare for gastro heaven.

The Centre de Pompidou is one of my favourite contemporary art museums in the world.

Dinner at Le Gaigne was one of those amazing meals that you carry with you. One chef, one server/hostess, 20ish seat capacity, small and ever changing menu, delicious!!! http://restaurantlegaigne.fr/

For a bookstore of course you must stop at Shakespeare and Company. Or the stalls on the quais along the Seine.

Have an amazing trip!

Zemgirl
05-22-2012, 11:21 AM
I love the Musée Rodin, the museum is lovely and the grounds are beautiful.

It's always fun to stop by one of the markets - I think this list (http://chocolateandzucchini.com/parismarkets.php) is up to date.

I know it's not very original, but do drop by the Pierre Hermé shop on the Rue Bonaparte - and you can take whatever you buy to the Jardin du Luxembourg, which is always a plus! Speaking of sweet things, you can also try A l’Etoile d’Or (http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2009/12/a-letoile-dor/).

Personally, I think the best thing to do in Paris is just walk a lot, and stop anywhere that looks interesting. It's hard to go wrong!

allezfred
05-22-2012, 11:23 AM
Personally, I think the best thing to do in Paris is just walk a lot, and stop anywhere that looks interesting. It's hard to go wrong!

This is my recommendation too!

cruisin
05-22-2012, 01:50 PM
Personally, I think the best thing to do in Paris is just walk a lot, and stop anywhere that looks interesting. It's hard to go wrong!

I third this! I think that is the best thing to do in any city that you are visiting. I don't like guided tours, I love to get lost in a city. Wander and find wonderful shops, people watch. One thing we did in Paris: one evening we didn't feel like going out to a restaurant so we went to an amazing cheese shop and bought cheeses and different hams (sliced), then we went to a bread shop and got some incredible bread. Finally a wine shop and got some wines. We took it back to the hotel and ate on the balcony. It was the most pleasurable meal we had! I'm not much of a ham fan, but in France it is incredible.

Favorite Museum - The Musee d'Orsay. Also the Dali Museum up near Sacre Coeur. The entire area around the church is nice to wander, lots of artists, and their paintings, sketches, pastels.

Jenny
05-22-2012, 02:15 PM
Personally, I think the best thing to do in Paris is just walk a lot, and stop anywhere that looks interesting. It's hard to go wrong!

Exactly my thought before I opened this thread!

I also think a trip to Versailles is very much worth it, especially since you have lots of time. It's been awhile, but I'm pretty sure there is a convenient train, and then you can spend the day touring the palace and walking the grounds.

Again it's been awhile, but I recall you had to book in advance to see certain rooms, so if you are interested, be sure to check into it ahead of time.

cruisin
05-22-2012, 02:24 PM
Exactly my thought before I opened this thread!

I also think a trip to Versailles is very much worth it, especially since you have lots of time. It's been awhile, but I'm pretty sure there is a convenient train, and then you can spend the day touring the palace and walking the grounds.

Again it's been awhile, but I recall you had to book in advance to see certain rooms, so if you are interested, be sure to check into it ahead of time.

There is a "convenient" train. But you have to switch trains about halfway. It is a bit confusing because there is (was when we were there) no platform info, and the day we went, there was no one there to help us. Fortunately a young couple, who spoke English, were very kind and got us on the right train. But I agree Versailles was wonderful! Especially the gardens.

Artemis@BC
05-22-2012, 05:07 PM
Well, this one is a fairly well-known spot but it hasn't been mentioned yet: La Cimetière du Père Lachaise. It's the final resting place of sooo many famous people, such as Oscar Wilde, Sarah Bernhardt, Colette, Gertrude Stein, Balzac, Modigliani, Bizet, Chopin, Heloise & Abelard, Marcel Marceau, Edith Piaf, and Jim Morrison (sort of). Aside from the history, it's an absolutely beautiful location. You can take one of the tours, or pick up a free map and explore on your own.

Second the vote for Musee d'Orsay. In addition to the great impressionist paintings, the setting (in an old railway station) is magnificant.

For shopping, be sure to visit Les Galleries Layfayette. Even if you don't buy anything, the store is spectacular.

For a great view of the city go up the Montparnasse tower – cheaper and easier than Eiffel, plus includes a view of the whole city including the Eiffel.

And I agree with others, just pick a neighbourhood and walk. The Lonely Planet pocket guide is good for this because it's divided into neighbourhoods -- and it's small and easy to cary.

Sofia Alexandra
05-22-2012, 05:20 PM
Fromwhat I recall from my visits to Paris as a kid:

Eat crepes with Nutella from a street vendor. Don't step in dog poo. Be prepared to shower every day and launder your clothes often (unless you bring one outfit for each day you're there) - the air pollution is rather clingy.

Have fun! :)

Artemis@BC
05-22-2012, 05:45 PM
Eat crepes with Nutella from a street vendor.
Chacun à son goût, of course, but IMO crêpes from a street vendor are best, and most French, avec citron et sucre (lemon and sugar). :cool:


Don't step in dog poo.

The dog poo situation is much better now than it was 10 or more years ago, since they passed a scoop-your-poop law ... and Parisians are finally obeying it!

kylet3
05-22-2012, 05:50 PM
I went on a Contiki Trip but aside from the trip to the eiffel tower and the palace of Versailles, Paris is just somewhere you really need to do a lot of walking and just get lost in. The architecture, the culture, the museums, you really can't go wrong with anything you do. I'm not crazy on museums myself but I of course did about 90 minutes in the Louvre and that was more than enough for me for the museum side of it. Picnic on a nice day with a baguette a cheap bottle of wine and some other desserts on the Champs Du Mars under the eiffel tower is awesome too. I did that last year and you'll never know what you run into on those grounds.

The Sacre Couer is really awesome too, the view around Paris can't be beat, all the fabulous eateries and artists around as well. It just really depends what you like to do.

I would also reccommend a tour of the main opera house as well. The architecture and just the grandeur is fabulous as well!

Vagabond
05-22-2012, 05:52 PM
Adapting my personal list that I send out to friends seeking advice on the subject:

Basics and Getting Around

I recommend buying the Time Out guide to Paris. It has an amazing array of information, including suggestions for lodging, walks, shopping, restaurants, and entertainment. It will have some good suggestions about where to shop for your nieces. (The area extending from Beaubourg into the Marais has a lot of shops that might be suitable, but I can't give you any specific suggestions.)

Once in Paris, you should buy a copy of Pariscope, which is sold at every newstand, comes out at midweek, and costs about 50 cents. It will have all the listings you need for exhibitions and entertainment.

Walking is the best way to see most of Paris, but the Metro system is excellent and taxis are, along with wine, cheese, and flowers, one of the few reasonably priced things in town.

Getting out on the Seine is wonderful, and there are several ways to do it, including the Batobus (public transportation), the touristy bateaux mouches, and smaller boats that serve dinner.

Lastly, it is important to take sensible precautions against pickpockets, who are a much greater problem in Paris than in other large northern European cities.

Sites off the Beaten Path

1. The Marais. The whole area, but especially the Place des Vosges, the Musee Carnavalet (history of the city of Paris), the Rue des Rosiers (Jewish neighborhood), Rue du Faubourg St.-Antoine (food shops), and the Rue Vieille du Temple (art galleries and gay neighborhood).

2. The Ile de St. Louis. Make sure to get some ice cream at Berthillon if it's not closed for summer vacation.

3. The Monument to the Deported. Paris' Holocaust memorial. At the eastern end of the Ile de la Cité. One of the greatest monuments in a city of great monuments.

4. The Place Dauphine. On the opposite end of the Ile de la Cité.

5. The Coulée Verte, also known as the Promenade Plantée. A former railroad line turned into a garden and walkway, with art shops under the viaduct. It runs from near the Bastille to the Porte de Vincennes.

6. The Institut du Monde Arabe. Interesting exhibitions and great food at the café and restaurant upstairs. The view from the roof is one of the best in Paris.

7. The Luxembourg Garden. Try to go on a weekend morning, when the locals take their small children to the pony rides and puppet shows.

8. The Palais Royal.

9. The passages. These are several arcades spread out between the Louvre and the Palais Royal.

10. Houses by Le Corbusier: The Villa Jeannet and Villa La Roche in the Square du Docteur-Blanche, and the incomparable Villa Savoye in suburban Poissy.

11. The Musée Marmottan, 2 Rue Louis Boilly, has an excellent collection of Impressionist Are and will have a special exhibition devoted to the works of Berthe Morisot while you are there.

12. Outdoor ballroom-style dancing at the Square Tino Rossi, Quai Saint-Bernard (between the Gare d'Austerlitz and the Institut du Monde Arabe. Three outdoor amphitheaters where people go to dance on summer evenings. On weekends, at least, the dancing continues well after midnight.

Bookstores

There is an English-language bookstore, The Red Wheelbarrow, right in the Marais at 22 Rue St Paul. Shakespeare and Company is at 37 Rue Bûcherie on the Right Bank opposite Notre Dame. The Fifth Arrondissement is rich in bookstores, especially on the Rue des Ecoles and as you go up the hill along the Boulevard St Michel towards the Sorbonne.

If you have questions, feel free to send me a private message.