PDA

View Full Version : competition is killing higher ed



Pages : 1 [2]

Zemgirl
05-19-2012, 07:20 PM
^^ Just wanted to let you know that my son did a semester in Florence, 2nd semester, junior year. It actually wound up being cheaper than a semester at his school here. And not just tuition, that included air fare, room & board, traveling, etc.
I'm not surprised. While a lot of things are relatively inexpensive in the States, higher education is not one of them - tuition and other university-related expenses are really high compared to most places. I know some people think the availability of college loans make it possible for people to overspend on education and enable colleges to increase the costs rapidly. I don't know if this is true.

PDilemma
05-19-2012, 08:16 PM
^^ Just wanted to let you know that my son did a semester in Florence, 2nd semester, junior year. It actually wound up being cheaper than a semester at his school here. And not just tuition, that included air fare, room & board, traveling, etc.

She did a program with her university where she pays her regular tuition for the year--so she is not paying lower tuition. She also works to pay living expenses as her mom has no funds to help and there is no father in the picture. She could not do that abroad--so all the costs were more than if she had skipped it.

I was a high school English teacher. I know the limits of the salary and salaries are much lower in the state where she is and intends to stay. To me, if your financial situation is not strong in the first place and a year abroad necessitates more loans than you would normally have and you are planning for a low paying and increasingly unstable field---anything that adds to your debt is not a wise choice. A trip to Britain for a few weeks with a backpack and a hostel guide would have served her as well and cost her a lot less now and in the future.

Prancer
05-19-2012, 08:30 PM
Something is really wrong with the whole financial model of higher ed. I asked my alma mater many times why the tuition kept going up at an alarming rate. They always answered, "Well, the fee only covers [some percentage] of the actual cost." Upon my asking, "well, WHY does it cost so much?" I could never get a straight answer. Somewhere amidst the competition for more country-club-like facilities, many colleges have lost their way, and it doesn't surprise me that the author of the article found many colleges on the brink of financial ruin.

By far the biggest expense for colleges is human resources.

Some lay this at the feet of the business model (as in how schools have increasingly adopted corporate practices), which is said to have created sharp increases in salaries and benefits for administration (particularly) and faculty.


I'm not surprised. While a lot of things are relatively inexpensive in the States, higher education is not one of them - tuition and other university-related expenses are really high compared to most places. I know some people think the availability of college loans make it possible for people to overspend on education and enable colleges to increase the costs rapidly. I don't know if this is true.

I usually see financial aid rather than loans being blamed for this, but I would think loans would be considered an issue as well.

overedge
05-19-2012, 08:59 PM
Business professors are paid market rates or close to it (i.e. what you would be paying them would be equivalent to what they would get in the real world).

At top--level schools, yes, but this is certainly not true everywhere by a long shot. Some business profs with real-world experience take a big salary hit in going into academia, but the (relative) stability and security, plus the chance to do something interest and less stressful, is worth it to them.


A lot of the adjuncts, as you said, have other things going on and many of them are C-level execs and senior managers.

But adjuncts in business schools do not always get paid a premium over what adjuncts in other disciplines get paid. More than some get paid exactly the same as every other adjunct, but they do the work to build up their resumes/experience, or to give back to the development of their profession.

GarrAarghHrumph
05-20-2012, 01:45 AM
She did a program with her university where she pays her regular tuition for the year--so she is not paying lower tuition. She also works to pay living expenses as her mom has no funds to help and there is no father in the picture. She could not do that abroad--so all the costs were more than if she had skipped it.

I was a high school English teacher. I know the limits of the salary and salaries are much lower in the state where she is and intends to stay. To me, if your financial situation is not strong in the first place and a year abroad necessitates more loans than you would normally have and you are planning for a low paying and increasingly unstable field---anything that adds to your debt is not a wise choice. A trip to Britain for a few weeks with a backpack and a hostel guide would have served her as well and cost her a lot less now and in the future.

Due to similar financial issues to what you mentioned, I did was do a work exchange via BUNAC. They get you a work visa, and you can work abroad for nine months either while you're at college or just afterwards. The countries involved are more or less the former British colonies. To me, this was a nice way to get an "abroad" experience, while being able to earn my living expenses.

GarrAarghHrumph
05-20-2012, 01:56 AM
...Some business profs with real-world experience take a big salary hit in going into academia, but the (relative) stability and security, plus the chance to do something interest and less stressful, is worth it to them.

But adjuncts in business schools do not always get paid a premium over what adjuncts in other disciplines get paid. More than some get paid exactly the same as every other adjunct, but they do the work to build up their resumes/experience, or to give back to the development of their profession.

This was exactly my issue - I'd considered being a professor of business, but the opportunity costs are simply too high. Even in business, where the salaries are often higher than those in, say, the liberal arts, they *still* can't afford me. ;)

I do adjunct, not for the money, but because I enjoy it. I do get paid a premium over certain other adjuncts, for teaching in the business school. I also used to teach in tech at another school, and got a premium there as well. I'd been told the premium was to entice people in the field to teach, as there's more demand for adjuncts in certain of these fields then there are people with the skills who are willing to teach.

My husband actually adjuncts with only a bachelors degree, because so few people have the skills required to teach the class he teaches. And yet we know tons of liberal arts PhDs who can't even get adjunct teaching jobs. It's about the demand, or lack thereof, and the available supply of qualified people.