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skipaway
05-10-2012, 08:39 PM
All I can say is, Wow.

Current Time Magazine (http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/cutline/time-breastfeeding-cover-sparks-immediate-controversy-151539970.html)


"The kid on the cover of this week's Time magazine is really going to hate middle school," Gavin Purcell observed

jeffisjeff
05-10-2012, 09:14 PM
Of course Time would have to choose a mother who actually looks like a model. :lol:

I would be nice if they actually let me read the article associated with the cover. I've been curious whether a woman can do attachment parent and hold down a full time job outside of the home. It just doesn't seem possible...

I was able to read the following column, which accompanied the cover story and is rather interesting:

http://ideas.time.com/2012/05/10/the-science-behind-dr-sears-does-it-stand-up/

agalisgv
05-10-2012, 09:28 PM
I've been curious whether a woman can do attachment parent and hold down a full time job outside of the home. It just doesn't seem possible... Not sure what all goes into attachment parenting, but extended breastfeeding isn't difficult to do with a full-time job because by the time the baby is older, s/he is typically only nursing in the morning and/or evening.

FWIW, I breastfed both my babies for a good amount of time with no bottles, and worked full-time outside the home.

skategal
05-10-2012, 09:41 PM
Co-sleeping/family bed should also be compatible with full-time work outside the home.

VALuvsMKwan
05-10-2012, 09:45 PM
Of course Time would have to choose a mother who actually looks like a model. :lol:

I would be nice if they actually let me read the article associated with the cover. I've been curious whether a woman can do attachment parent and hold down a full time job outside of the home. It just doesn't seem possible...

I was able to read the following column, which accompanied the cover story and is rather interesting:

http://ideas.time.com/2012/05/10/the-science-behind-dr-sears-does-it-stand-up/

Not having read the article, I am reacting strictly to contents of posts here, and therefore...ATTACHMENT PARENT? Does that include umbilical cord still being intact? :eek:

Prancer
05-10-2012, 09:49 PM
Not having read the article, I am reacting strictly to contents of posts here, and therefore...ATTACHMENT PARENT? Does that include umbilical cord still being intact? :eek:

Attachment Parenting (http://www.attachmentparenting.org/)

Anita18
05-10-2012, 09:51 PM
Attachment Parenting (http://www.attachmentparenting.org/)
Just sounds like....being a parent. :confused:

Prancer
05-10-2012, 09:53 PM
Just sounds like....being a parent. :confused:

Uh, not exactly.

AP calls for extended breastfeeding, co-sleeping, and a whole host of other things.

AP principals: http://www.attachmentparenting.org/principles/principles.php

barbk
05-10-2012, 10:03 PM
Co-sleeping/family bed should also be compatible with full-time work outside the home.

It is also compatible with a very high percentage of the remaining sudden infant deaths. :scream:
http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/762302

agalisgv
05-10-2012, 10:15 PM
It is also compatible with a very high percentage of the remaining sudden infant deaths. :scream:
http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/762302 Your article won't open for me, but aren't most infant deaths related to co-sleeping because of alcohol/drug impairment on the part of the parent?
Just over half -- 54% -- of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases in southwest England occurred when the baby was co-sleeping in the same bed as a parent, a case-control study showed.

That compares with 20% of infants among randomly selected families and controls deemed to be at high risk for SIDS, Peter Fleming, MBChB, PhD, of the University of Bristol in England, and colleagues reported online in BMJ.

Much of the elevated risk appeared to be attributable to drug and alcohol use among the parents.http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/16428

skatesindreams
05-10-2012, 10:18 PM
It seems like the latest thing to make parents feel guilty about if they don't choose to do this.
I'd be worried about un-healthy parent/child relationships later in life, as well.

susan6
05-10-2012, 10:59 PM
We've had some local ads warning parents to not have their babies sleep in the same bed, that putting them in an empty/uncluttered crib is safer. Given the co-sleeping trend, I thought it was kind of weird.

maatTheViking
05-10-2012, 11:33 PM
SIDS: I find it interesting that the advice is regional - except sleeping on the back, which seems to be the number 1 prevention against SIDS. In the US they advice to have the baby sleep in an empty crib, using sleepsacks etc. In Denmark everyone uses down comforters (ugh I hate sheets and have my importet comforters!) including babies. On the other hand, they advice that the room the baby sleeps in is cool, around 16 degrees C. (about 60 F).

I also think it might be more normal in Denmark to have the infant sleep in your bed (comforters and all), but I am not sure.

Attachement parenting: I think of it more as a gradual thing, and a reaction to the seperation/Cry it out/independence trend - baby is supposed to be able to sleep by itslef by 6months, not get fed on demand anymore, and so forth.
Personally, I feel most parents would do something in between - whatever works for you. I find it odd when people get 'married' to an idea - families are different.

DFJ
05-10-2012, 11:42 PM
Call me selfish but I quite liked having some time to myself at the end of the day. My kids never slept with me and they grew up to be normal, healthy children (and adults).

My girlfiend's daughter had the most beautiful 9-month old little girl. She was crying early one morning so her mom brought her to bed with her and they both fell back to sleep. When mom woke up, her baby girl had died. Horrific story. Nothing could revive her. Now her mom still lives with the horrible thought that she may have smothered her daughter. Nothing anyone said to her could make her feel differently. No thanks...babies are fine in their own space.

Hannahclear
05-11-2012, 12:23 AM
I hate Dr. Sears with the fire of a thousand suns. That damn Baby Book really messed with my head when I was in a very new and unfamiliar mental space.