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MacMadame
05-17-2012, 06:21 PM
I do think, however, that the Time cover has not done AP parenting any favors.

Can't argue with that.

I suspect the mom thought that by telling her story in a national magazine that she could educate people about these issues and maybe even make her way of life more mainstream or at least more tolerated.

Personally, I think that was naive.

All I've seen is the same old garbage -- misconceptions and misinformation about breastfeeding and family bed and what AP actually is -- as well as the usual "what about the children?!" arguments. It's incredibly annoying. :lol:

numbers123
05-17-2012, 09:40 PM
I personally believe that it is bullshit, at least for some babies. My son was definely hungry (we went through a period at 9 months were we tried just comforting him - no he was actually HUNGRY in the middle of the night still, despite being a good eater).

I think that before 12 months, you really need to respond.

I think that it depends on the infant. my oldest son slept 10 hours the night we came home from the hospital. He woke up in the middle of the night when he was sick, but not always. Really never want to eat during the night.
My middle child woke up to eat every 2-3 hours through 18 - 20 months. He was premature, but a big premie weighing 5 lbs, 10 ounces at 34 weeks. When they removed the vent and let him eat, they limited his feedings to 15 ccs (1/2 ounce) every 3 hours for the first 24 hours of eating. When they allowed breastfeeding, he was content.
My youngest son had severe GI reflux which caused not only pain, but wheezing and frequent pneumonia from aspiration. The only thing that was soothing to him was an upright position - and spent the first 10 weeks being held or in a swing. He preferred the swing. It took me several weeks to realize that sleeping in the recliner with him on my chest made things worse. I thought I was doing the best thing by holding him, responding to his crying..yet the thing he wanted most to relieve the reflux and being put in a swing what he needed.
You need to become aware of what your child's personality and what they need.

maatTheViking
05-17-2012, 10:16 PM
You need to become aware of what your child's personality and what they need.

yeah, that was what I was trying to get across :). You need to follow the baby, and not 'the book'. No matter what book you are using.

kwanfan1818
05-17-2012, 10:35 PM
What I thought most striking in "Bringing Up Bebe" was this part:


Bean's regular pediatrician never mentioned this four-meal-a-day plan to me. But he's away at Bean's next appointment. His replacement is a young Frenchwoman who has a daughter about Bean's age. When I ask her about the schedule, she says that--bien sur--Bean should only be eating four times a day. Then the doctor grabs some Post-its and scribbles down The Schedule. it's the same one again: morning, noon, four P.M. and eight P.M. When I later ask Bean's regular doctor why he never mentioned this, he says he prefers not to suggest schedules to American parents, because they tend to become too doctrinaire about them.

IceAlisa
05-18-2012, 12:16 AM
I've never heard of feeding on schedule. Doesn't everyone feed on demand?

heckles
05-18-2012, 12:33 AM
I suspect the mom thought that by telling her story in a national magazine that she could educate people about these issues and maybe even make her way of life more mainstream or at least more tolerated.

The one good thing this mother did is memorialize her nuttiness in Time so that any woman considering starting a relationship with her son 20 years from now can simply Google this duo and run far, far away. Today's "Attachment Moms" are tomorrow's mothers-in-law from hell.

numbers123
05-18-2012, 12:36 AM
I've never heard of feeding on schedule. Doesn't everyone feed on demand?

40 years ago, the prevailing thought was a timed schedule. I worked in peds and the doctors would order feedings at 8-12-4-8. The thought was to train them to sleep through the night.

I worked with a nurse who kept to her schedule of 9-1-5-9 for her daughter. I think she changed her strict schedule 5 or 6 years later when her son was born, but feedings were still 4 times a day.

We used to use a meat based formula for babies who were allergic to milk based formulas and soy based formulas. We used to feed Nutramigin, Pro-So-Bee, Isomil, Enfamil. One of them was taken off the market in the late 70's or early 80's because of severe electrolyte issues.

I also participated in the research that a Ped GI doctor did in the development of Alimentin. Let's just say all the formula development was based upon doing stool testing for pH, occult blood and sugar content. One night one of the dad's and I decided we had to see why the infants hated drinking the formula (for the most part the infants were fed via continuous NG drips but we would eventually wean to oral feeds). I can't tell you how many crackers I ate to try and remove that taste from my mouth

kwanfan1818
05-18-2012, 01:17 AM
40 years ago, the prevailing thought was a timed schedule. I worked in peds and the doctors would order feedings at 8-12-4-8. The thought was to train them to sleep through the night.

The process described in "Bringing Up Bebe" is to work towards a gradual adjustment to that schedule, but only after the baby can get enough nourishment. (Until then, it's on demand.) It's not a suddenly imposed solution.

IceAlisa
05-18-2012, 01:20 AM
I can't tell you how many crackers I ate to try and remove that taste from my mouth

Ugh.

numbers123
05-18-2012, 04:09 AM
The process described in "Bringing Up Bebe" is to work towards a gradual adjustment to that schedule, but only after the baby can get enough nourishment. (Until then, it's on demand.) It's not a suddenly imposed solution.

The doctor's orders that I used to enter and carry out were more of the feed every 3 hours or every 4 hours, no on demand feeding schedules. And once they started on solids (around 6 - 8 weeks) went to the 4 times a day feeds. But then that was 40 years ago.

maatTheViking
05-18-2012, 04:14 AM
My mom was told to feed every 4 hours. She said that lasted about a day with my big brother (born 1970), and then she decided it was wrong and fed on demand.
Hmmm, it might not be a coincidence that I tend to follow my instinct with baby Viking :P

UGG
05-18-2012, 03:09 PM
My son is almost 15 months old. I was told the first month they need to be fed every three or four housrs, and then after that, feed when they are hungry and let them sleep through the night if they can.

My son JUST started sleeping through the night last weeks. Its the first full weeks sleep I have gotten since we brought him home.

I do not AP, but I did bring him in bed with me every night when he woke up only because I was too tired to sooth him back to sleep-my husband and I both work. It was strange-he would go right to sleep at 7:30 but wake up every night at midnight until a week ago. I would just give him a bottle and he would fall asleep with me.

The funny thing is-after he turned one and he was still doing this, everyone and their brother was telling me something MUST be wrong because he SHOULD be sleeping through the night by now. I asked my pedi and he just said nothing was wrong and he was still very young, and some kids don't sleep through the night.

The full nights sleep has been wonderful but I have to admit that on Wednesday night, I was kind of hoping he would wake up at midnigh so I could snuggle with him. :lol:

maatTheViking
05-18-2012, 03:49 PM
UGG, my 16 month old just started sleeping through the night too, about a month ago :P.

I think there is a lot of pressure on getting the baby to sleep through the night (everyone is asking), and I have reached the same conclusion as you - don't worry, babies sleep differently.

UGG
05-18-2012, 04:19 PM
UGG, my 16 month old just started sleeping through the night too, about a month ago :P.

I think there is a lot of pressure on getting the baby to sleep through the night (everyone is asking), and I have reached the same conclusion as you - don't worry, babies sleep differently.

I agree. I mean I understand WHY we want our kids to sleep through the night...but I am serious-a few people were totally alarmed when I said he wasn't. And I am sitting there thinking to myself..."ummm he is 1 and wants his mama. Why is that weird?" I am 35 and sometimes I wake up and want my mom. :lol:

Peaches LaTour
05-18-2012, 07:48 PM
Size of the breast is no indication of milk supply.

How many of you think that kid is not 3? He looks older to me somehow.

Ridiculously sensationalistic cover. And I'm right there with all of you who are :rolleyes: at the fact that the mom is absolutely gorgeous and slim (and probably well rested and in great shape from 2 hours a day at the gym and custom-made organic vegetarian diet, courtesy of the live-in help).

When I first saw this cover my immediate thought was: this is a staged photo shoot with two professional models, one in her early 20's and the other about 6 years old.