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View Full Version : Yuzuru Hanyu to be coached by Brian Orser



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ProgramerUSFS
04-30-2012, 09:16 PM
There are more talented jumpers than her at the same age, with triples up to lutz.. I don't understand why people around her says she has the highest jumps in the world when clearly, Sotnikova or Gracie has more heights...

I just love Gracie's jumps and think she is very special. But I don't know what her jump height or hang time would be. The web site on this Sami says she exceeds at times .72 Not sure what that means and if your statement about Sotnikova or Gracie is true or not. Does anyone know what their jump height is? Anyone can shed more light on what .72 means that might help. In the end, I am not sure height maters as much as performing jumps in a competition.

But back OT, I am sure that having Hanyu under the same roof will inspire this Sami to go for quads even more.

leapfrogonice
05-01-2012, 12:14 AM
The collection of elite international skaters that Yuzuru will be able to train alongside is sure to provide him with inspiration. Am very keen to see how his body continues to develop as well as he matures further.

pinky166
05-01-2012, 01:03 PM
:sekret: sources tell me Christina Gao WILL be starting Harvard this coming fall (makes sense, she can only defer for a year, and then she'd be starting college, and Harvard no less, during an Olympic year, or have to reapply to colleges all over again if she were to wait another year to go), so I assume she will switch to Mitchell and Johansson and no longer be with Orser, or at least, not as a full-time student, so maybe this was known when Orser took on Hanyu. I would assume Orser probably has a limit on the number of elite skaters he is willing to train at once, and perhaps knowing Christina is leaving opened up a spot for another elite skater. Idk.

os168
05-01-2012, 02:41 PM
:sekret: sources tell me Christina Gao WILL be starting Harvard this coming fall (makes sense, she can only defer for a year, and then she'd be starting college, and Harvard no less, during an Olympic year, or have to reapply to colleges all over again if she were to wait another year to go), so I assume she will switch to Mitchell and Johansson and no longer be with Orser, or at least, not as a full-time student, so maybe this was known when Orser took on Hanyu. I would assume Orser probably has a limit on the number of elite skaters he is willing to train at once, and perhaps knowing Christina is leaving opened up a spot for another elite skater. Idk.

Harvard is too great to give up and good for Christina.

On the other hand I am sure she can be 'gently persuaded' to make room for an OGM contender. She and Adam shares the same agent as Orser (and I speculate Hanyu too. This is yet to be confirmed.)

Who do you think the sport agency want to bank on more to maximise their future earnings? They certainly would have thought about all this already and flanked everyone in line or out of the way to maximise the chance of the more lucrative deals will go through. Or it might not be lucrative now, but they will be by the time they are done with it. There are potential 10 years billing cycle they can get from Hanyu and Orser provided Hanyu medal or win the gold at the Olympics and a few WC.

aliceanne
05-01-2012, 03:33 PM
Do agents have any say in where skaters train? I thought it was the sponsors who are paying the training bills who have the clout to make those conditions. As far as I know agents don't provide any training money. I doubt a competitive skater would cross their sponsor or federation to please their agent. We already saw where that got Evan Lysacek. I think it's a stretch to say that IMG has power over the skating federations, it appears to me to be the other way around.

Sylvia
05-01-2012, 03:36 PM
Do agents have any say in where skaters train?
Not that I'm aware of.


I thought it was the sponsors who are paying the training bills who have the clout to make those conditions.
For the majority of skaters (eta: North American) it's the parents who are paying the bulk of the training bills.

Last I heard, Christina Gao hadn't yet made a final decision on her college/skating plans (and when she does, I'm pretty sure it will be her and her family's decision, not IMG's).

IMG recently signed Gracie Gold, BTW (mentioned in one of Phil Hersh's articles).


I heard it [Yuzuru Hanyu's press conference] will be held on May, 6(sunday). :)
Thank you!

Willowway
05-01-2012, 03:45 PM
Remember, as Sylvia just mentioned, that most skaters do not have sponsors - they manage with a combination of federation money, family money and for a few lucky ones, some earned money from shows and appearances. In the very few cases where a skater has significant sponsorship money (not to be confused with successful skaters who have endorsement and advertising contracts), I would think that the sponsors must work along with the relevant federation.

Sponsors don't call the shots, agents even less so about training conditions. For agents, training situations are largely irrelevant - the competitive results are what affects their business and of course they hope their skaters do well but they aren't involved in the training process.

ros01
05-01-2012, 04:31 PM
You do read of agents who get EXTREMELY involved, or think they should be. I think it may just be due to the personalities and level of personal relationship.

Willowway
05-01-2012, 05:18 PM
You do read of agents who get EXTREMELY involved, or think they should be.

Curious - who specifically can I read about or where?

Other than parents who double as managers and can be overcontrolling (not all of them to be sure but a few notable individuals over the years), I'm having a hard time recalling a professional agent who got extremely involved in a skater's training. I'd like to know who you're referencing - thanks.

os168
05-01-2012, 07:13 PM
Do agents have any say in where skaters train? I thought it was the sponsors who are paying the training bills who have the clout to make those conditions. As far as I know agents don't provide any training money. I doubt a competitive skater would cross their sponsor or federation to please their agent. We already saw where that got Evan Lysacek. I think it's a stretch to say that IMG has power over the skating federations, it appears to me to be the other way around.



Remember, as Sylvia just mentioned, that most skaters do not have sponsors - they manage with a combination of federation money, family money and for a few lucky ones, some earned money from shows and appearances. In the very few cases where a skater has significant sponsorship money (not to be confused with successful skaters who have endorsement and advertising contracts), I would think that the sponsors must work along with the relevant federation.

Sponsors don't call the shots, agents even less so about training conditions. For agents, training situations are largely irrelevant - the competitive results are what affects their business and of course they hope their skaters do well but they aren't involved in the training process.


Yes and no, these are rather simplistic way to look at the agency business and their client relationship, and not exactly how an agency works. Agency usually don't care where their candidate trains as long they can train well, that is UNLESS someone want to buy a good OGM team in which they could also represent.

A well run agency doesn't work reactively according to current supply and demand based on existing representation or filling up empty 'spots'. They are likely to work proactively speculate and create opportunities where the big money can be made in the future by consistently seeking more/new candidates, new clients, put together projects/plans with the objective of turning them into profits. A medal is a main way to achieve this but it is not the only way. They are likely to invest a lot of time and effort to groom their best candidates (think of them as 'star maker') to maximise their earning potentials, so good training, excellent coaching, good publicity, medals are all by product of that. To deliver this, they will align themselves with anyone that can benefit from the same goal. They will also do this with rich clients who they know have certain allocated annual budgets which they can bid for.

Every candidate are likely to have different funding conditions, so in a way it doesn't matter if they are the sponsors, the federation or the skaters themselves - so long as someone is willing to pay - looking to buy - where there are money to be made, the agency will find ways to deliver that. Including putting together new products and services where they can surcharge. Like headhunters, it doesn't depends on the sort of job that is advertised to the public. An agency need a good healthy supply of 'rising' talents they can scope, develop and sell (or sign one that is ready made), as long as there are those who are willing to pay. Doesn't matter if they 'might' be looking or 'actively' looking. If the sole objective is winning medals, then they'd have signed Patrick Chan long ago. The reason they hadn't is likely because there are more money to be made by exploiting his rivals who have deep pockets where they stand to earn a healthy profit. In any case, to sign Patrick now would be a conflict of interest to both parties, and if Patrick did sign, he is likely to be undermined internally in favour of those bring more money to the agency. Similarly Johnny Weir seems to be doing better commercially even it is Evan with the OGM and so forth (okay i don't know if this is true, but I bet they have different agents).

Take football/soccer sport for example, it doesn't matter if a football player is already happy at his club, or that club has already got a great team that wins them trophies. There are always businesses to be made when they can sign the footballer and place them at another football club, or get the trophy winning Club interested in another world class player. Or even better yet, headhunt or shift that footballer to move to another club to free up this spot where they can place one of their newly signed footballer who could benefit to be on a trophy winning team etc. Generally the more turn over, the better it is for the agency business. Whatever reasons they decide move doesn't really matter - as long as they move, they are earning their %.

Besides serving a key business functions in brokering, agencies also set out to manage the market condition where they can do good business. Although agency technically don't have any say in where the skater train, they do have good deal of influences over their client approach to decision making. To ensure the deal go through, they will certainly make good use of their role as the negotiator to manipulate views to a desirable outcome - driven by profit.

It is advantageous for the agency to broke internally. If the coach/talent is represented by another agency, the agency may stand to lose out on a chunk of commission, management fee, and the perks that comes with it (but depends on how the deal was structured. Whether is someone looking to buy, or if it is someone looking to sell). The talent usually don't pay unless he is self funded, but he will need pay commission towards any endorsement/sponsor ship the agency can get for him.

t.mann
05-02-2012, 03:50 AM
What, Orser belongs to IMG?
A coach needs to have an agent?
I am curious that other famous coaches(Morozov, Carroll, Yuka&Jason etc.) belong to agencies as well.

ChibiChibi
05-02-2012, 05:45 AM
What, Orser belongs to IMG?
A coach needs to have an agent?
I am curious that other famous coaches(Morozov, Carroll, Yuka&Jason etc.) belong to agencies as well.

I know Yuka is with IMG.

JasperBoy
05-02-2012, 05:56 AM
I imagine Brian's affiliation with IMG dates back to his days as a show skater, not so long ago. He was doing some choreography for shows as well.

lakewood
05-02-2012, 07:35 AM
I imagine Brian's affiliation with IMG dates back to his days as a show skater, not so long ago. He was doing some choreography for shows as well.

That contract ended when he quit show skating and he signed a new contract as a coach right after the Vancouver Olympics.

RumbleFish
05-02-2012, 07:59 AM
That contract ended when he quit show skating and he signed a new contract as a coach right after the Vancouver Olympics.

Haha, this smells really bad.
Why in the world would a coach need an agent?

Also, didn't IMG say that they have no associations with Orser's coaching business at the height of Kim/Orser split drama?