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Bournekraatzfan
04-15-2012, 06:23 AM
Just playing devil's advocate, but couldn't one also argue that if someone needs absolute quiet during a skate, then maybe that person should watch at home?

I know people are saying it's improper etiquette, but it seems like it's more a case of personal preference. For example, at movie theaters, the message is given at the start of each movie to not talk or text. But I don't recall any such messages given at the start of skating competitions. Taking pictures with flashes is singled out as a no-no, but not silence during skating. While clearly some prefer to watch comps in silence, I'm not quite sure why people assume that should be broadly applied, or enforced on others when that's not an explicit expectation given at the outset of the comp.

interesting point. but couldn't it be argued that if someone feels the need to crack gum, talk loudly or text frequently during an event, that person should be the one to watch at home? It seems to me that most people here are fine with the noise and distractions at times when skaters aren't actually performing, and the performances are so short and the breaks so frequent that it seems reasonable to expect people to wait for these breaks to conduct these activities. JMO, of course.

Aussie Willy
04-15-2012, 07:04 AM
interesting point. but couldn't it be argued that if someone feels the need to crack gum, talk loudly or text frequently during an event, that person should be the one to watch at home? It seems to me that most people here are fine with the noise and distractions at times when skaters aren't actually performing, and the performances are so short and the breaks so frequent that it seems reasonable to expect people to wait for these breaks to conduct these activities. JMO, of course.
I totally agree. I get really tired of the argument that if you don't like it don't go. At the end of the day it is the few bads ones who spoil it for the rest, not the other way around.

agalisgv
04-15-2012, 08:34 AM
interesting point. but couldn't it be argued that if someone feels the need to crack gum, talk loudly or text frequently during an event, that person should be the one to watch at home? I think that has been the argument of this entire thread.

My point was arguably there really isn't a good reason to say those who talk at comps are the ones that should stay at home because an equally good argument can be made that those who do not like talking should stay at home instead.

People are presuming the way they like to enjoy watching skating comps is *the* way to watch skating comps, and those who watch differently are somehow breaking accepted etiquette. The issue I raised is that etiquette doesn't really belong to sporting events, and figure skating competitions are sporting events--not Broadway performances. Things like SOI are artistic performances. Worlds et al are sporting events. Just because someone thinks skating competitions should conduct themselves like SOI performances doesn't mean that should now be regarded as the proper etiquette for everyone else to conform to. The fact that such niceties aren't announced at skating comps (unlike instructions to refrain from flash photography) might indicate people are rather imposing their personal preferences on others in a way that may be considered, well, rude and presumptuous.

Aussie Willy
04-15-2012, 09:28 AM
My point was arguably there really isn't a good reason to say those who talk at comps are the ones that should stay at home because an equally good argument can be made that those who do not like talking should stay at home instead.

Sorry but there is no justification for rudeness, regardless of the type of event or the context.

agalisgv
04-15-2012, 03:04 PM
Sorry but there is no justification for rudeness And my point is while you think they are being rude, they may think *you* are the rude one. IOW, others may see *you* as the trouble maker.

Just depends on perspective and personal preferences.

manhn
04-15-2012, 07:19 PM
Figure skating is also different in that you are in your seat for practically the whole day. After awhile it can be hard for people to suppress their natural tendencies.

Also what is wrong with chewing gum? Folks at gpf were eating poutine!

emason
04-15-2012, 08:16 PM
And my point is while you think they are being rude, they may think *you* are the rude one. IOW, others may see *you* as the trouble maker.

Just depends on perspective and personal preferences.

No, it's a matter of manners and respect for others. IMHO, no one should be saying anything, not uttering a syllable so long as a skater is performing on ice and music is playing. You are in the arena to watch and enjoy a performance and to give the competitor on ice your full attention. Whispering, talking, etc. to your companions is for when the program is over. People don't pay hard-earned $$$ to listen to others; they pay it to get the full impact of the program, and that includes being able to concentrate on the music, not the people in the seats near you.

Jemestone
04-15-2012, 09:01 PM
Heh, at the ballet right now (intermission) and an annoying group of kids just moved right behide me....GREAT :rolleyes:

PeterG
04-15-2012, 09:03 PM
Just playing devil's advocate, but couldn't one also argue that if someone needs absolute quiet during a skate, then maybe that person should watch at home?

There is a difference between people who talk LOUDLY through the ENTIRE performance...and those who whisper to their friend as much as they like.


Also what is wrong with chewing gum? Folks at gpf were eating poutine!

There is a difference between eating like a HUMAN BEING...and taking a big friggin' scoop of poutine, shovelling it into my mouth and then moving my face three inches from yours while chomping away on said poutine in your face. SCHLURP, GLOMP, SHMACK!!! (Point being that you don't need to make everyone in your section aware that yes indeed, your ARE in fact eating - whether it be popping bubble gum or whatever else.)

agalisgv
04-15-2012, 09:07 PM
No, it's a matter of manners and respect for others. For some, manners and respect for others means not butting your nose into other people's business and telling them how they should behave at a sporting event so others can pretend they are attending a Broadway performance.

Some people see nothing wrong with doing that, but others may find that immensely rude--moreso than any perceived offense caused by gum-popping or chatting.

Like I said, different perspectives and all....

Aussie Willy
04-15-2012, 11:35 PM
For some, manners and respect for others means not butting your nose into other people's business and telling them how they should behave at a sporting event so others can pretend they are attending a Broadway performance.

Some people see nothing wrong with doing that, but others may find that immensely rude--moreso than any perceived offense caused by gum-popping or chatting.

Like I said, different perspectives and all....
Not it is not about different perspectives. And there is no justification for it.

That is like saying that everyone has to accept the one arsehole who lives in a neighbourhood who drives everyone crazy with their doof doof music. The arsehole's attitude is if you have a problem with it you move. That is not fair and not how a civilised society should behave.

Casey2
04-15-2012, 11:48 PM
At the recent Cleveland Nats, a guy next to us was talking constantly to his wife about 'nothing'. ("Wow, look at that costume! Can you just buy material like that?" ) When Bradley started to skate he said "Wow! He is one big dude!" It was there first Nats and you wanted to cut him some slack, but the constant chatter was really annoying. At a Zamboni break, the woman in front of him turned around and said, "You aren't at home in your living room. Please don't talk during a performance." This worked, but he then felt free to comment more loudly when there was no skating.

I am disturbed by the number of people who walk in during a performance. If you are trying to decide lutz or flutz, having someone pass in front of you is a real bummer. In NC, if I was waiting at the entrance for a skater to finish and someone started down the stairs, I would ask them to wait. No one got offended, but they seemed surprised at the suggestion.

sequins
04-16-2012, 05:17 AM
Not it is not about different perspectives. And there is no justification for it.

That is like saying that everyone has to accept the one arsehole who lives in a neighbourhood who drives everyone crazy with their doof doof music. The arsehole's attitude is if you have a problem with it you move. That is not fair and not how a civilised society should behave.

Agree 150%! I've got that arsehole in my neighbourhood:lol: Roaring craptacular music on a Tuesday night at 4a.m. what's the problem with that?:rolleyes:The problem with society today is that people have a 'different perspective' on manners and respect and that's why no one has any. Common decency shouldn't be difficult for anyone to figure out but looking around I'm afraid it's all too difficult.

When I think about it I can probably compare skating more to tennis, but seriously why pay for a ticket and go and force everyone to watch and listen to your personal crap and opinions, we pay to watch skating not you and your 'dramatics'.

lowtherlore
04-16-2012, 10:24 AM
You can have some annoying cases spoiling your day, but speaking of some athletes talking in the audience during others' skates I would cut them some slack. Figure skating events are essentially sporting events, more so to the skaters than to the fans. Fans would often want to connect with their favorites' programs, but for the skaters and other practitioners of the sport the attention I guess would be predominantly drawn to the technical side of the execution. I mean, it would be like baseball fans exchanging comments at a baseball park after each pitch or play. Once I was seated next to some young skaters and staff members from the U.S., Canadian and Russian teams and they talked nonstop through the last two groups, but it didnít bother me that much. The competition music was loud enough and I had little problem paying attention to whatís happening on the ice.

allezfred
04-16-2012, 11:11 AM
People are presuming the way they like to enjoy watching skating comps is *the* way to watch skating comps, and those who watch differently are somehow breaking accepted etiquette.

Either you haven't attended very many skating competitions or the ones you go to are competely different than the ones I've been to :shuffle:, but I would definitely say there is an accepted etiquette at skating competitions and it is outside of that etiquette to talk constantly while a skater is performing their programme.


The issue I raised is that etiquette doesn't really belong to sporting events, and figure skating competitions are sporting events--not Broadway performances. Things like SOI are artistic performances. Worlds et al are sporting events. Just because someone thinks skating competitions should conduct themselves like SOI performances doesn't mean that should now be regarded as the proper etiquette for everyone else to conform to. The fact that such niceties aren't announced at skating comps (unlike instructions to refrain from flash photography) might indicate people are rather imposing their personal preferences on others in a way that may be considered, well, rude and presumptuous.

Skating is a sport, but at the same time because of the artistic element involved it is different from most other sports. There aren't very many other sports where people in the crowd are knitting or are throwing stuffed toys and flowers at the competitiors. :lol:

The announcements about flash photography (and ensuring that flowers etc are covered when thrown on the ice) are about the safety of the skaters and not an etiquette issue per se.

The announcers don't tell people not to belch or fart either. Doesn't mean they are acceptable things to be done in public though does it?;)