PDA

View Full Version : Attention Mommies & Daddies: Would You Feed Your Baby Like Alicia Silverstone??



Pages : 1 2 3 4 [5] 6

IceAlisa
04-05-2012, 03:44 PM
Then why do some dentists turn their nose up at pacifiers? Are they not shaped like nipples? (Forgive me, it's been YEARS since I've seen a female one!).

Not sure. Ask our house dentist, Citlali. :) I didn't use one because I saw lots of babies fuss when they slept and it fell out of their mouth. Plus Mini Ice wasn't interested when I did try it once.

Citlali
04-05-2012, 04:54 PM
Not sure. Ask our house dentist, Citlali. :) I didn't use one because I saw lots of babies fuss when they slept and it fell out of their mouth. Plus Mini Ice wasn't interested when I did try it once.
:D Well a breast is different than a pacifier or bottle so in some babies the use of a pacifier may cause trouble breastfeeding... but the real problem is prolonged pacifier use, it usually leads to long-term dental problems like making the front teeth to slant outward or not come out properly.

UGG
04-05-2012, 06:23 PM
When I had my son last year, one of the nurses at the hospital shunned bottles and pacifiers if you even mentioned you wanted to try breastfeeding because it would cause "nipple confusion" for the baby. I was like whateves and just gave him one when we got home.

IceAlisa
04-05-2012, 09:53 PM
I heard about the nipple confusion theory. Didn't apply to Mini. I was at school/an intern at the time and went back when he was 3 weeks old. He had both breast and bottle but had never shown signs of confusion, just chowed down. I guess there are babies who do get confused.

heckles
04-05-2012, 10:47 PM
Ewwww! As if!

MacMadame
04-06-2012, 03:52 AM
You have a study that demonstrates that the likelihood is the same?
I didn't say the likelihood was the same. I said the MECHANISM is the same. Which is that the bacteria gets passed from mom's mouth to baby's mouth.


Study to show this?
It was in the news a lot when I had my first kid and in some baby books for the second. Maybe they say something different now, but my kids are teenagers so all it's moot for me. ;)


Do you not believe what the dentists say?
Honestly? No. I would believe a family doctor though because that's the sort of things they learn in med school--transmission and mechanisms of disease.

Plus, I've never had a dentist say any of that to me. Ever. So I don't buy that this is some universal advice and the majority of dentist are adamant about it.

Anyway, the point of bringing up the cleaning of pacifiers and bottle nipples is not that it's a good idea but that, if Alicia Silverstone had done that, no one would have written it up in a gossip mag or started a thread on FSU about how gross it was and how she was putting her child in danger. Yet, it is gross and the danger of passing on dental caries is there for those things too.

But as a culture we are more accepting of that behavior and it doesn't lead to all the :drama: that doing something non-mainstream often brings to FSU.

P.S. to whomever asked, no pacifiers are not like nipples. In fact, they can cause nipple confusion in breastfeeding kids because the mouth action is different. THere was also a belief that they caused kids to need braces later in life but I'm not sure that was born out by actual studies. A lot of advice that new parents get isn't particularly evidence-based unfortunately.

IceAlisa
04-06-2012, 03:57 AM
My point is that while cleaning the pacifier is an occasional thing, feeding your baby is a several times a day thing. Do you understand that the severity of infection depends on the number of organisms, among other things? That's the difference. It also depends on whether you have actual tooth decay in the mouth. The more she does it, and she does several times a day, every day, the more chances are that he will get it as well.

Also, what do you think dentists learn in dental school? Their first two years of education are very similar to medical students'. You probably don't have young children and since you did, recommendations have changed. I hear the above from pediatric dentists all the time. They are very adamant about it as is Citlali.

Finally, as I've said before, no one is calling CPS on Alicia. But many think she is messing up his teeth unnecessarily as well as developing a habit of going after her food and into her mouth.

MacMadame
04-06-2012, 04:23 AM
My point is that while cleaning the pacifier is an occasional thing, feeding your baby is a several times a day thing.

We don't know how often she feeds him like that. It could certainly be occasional. Or it could be as often as my neighbor used to put her kid's pacifier in her mouth -- which was about 2-3x a day. Hardly occasional at all.

maatTheViking
04-06-2012, 04:30 AM
Mini-Vikings pediatrician said pacifiers were fine - sucking is sucking. As long as you have a good latch to the breast first.
They sell pacifiers which has been approved by ADA which shouldn't cause teeth issues. Or so they say.

IceAlisa
04-06-2012, 04:49 AM
We don't know how often she feeds him like that. It could certainly be occasional. Or it could be as often as my neighbor used to put her kid's pacifier in her mouth -- which was about 2-3x a day. Hardly occasional at all.

The article quoted Alicia saying that the kid is conditioned to attack her when she sits down to eat. Hardly sounds like an occasional thing.

Also, with feeding it's small bites and many transfers of food per feeding vs. 2-3 pacifiers a day. Do the math. Not that the pacifier thing is great either. Why would someone think they are "cleaning" it by putting it in their mouth?

What is the benefit of this, anyway? We've (or those of us who buy into the germ theory) established the risks.

IceAlisa
04-14-2012, 07:18 PM
Now I have an idea why she may have released the mouth-to-mouth feeding video: to promote a show (http://tv.yahoo.com/news/alicia-silverstone-reunites-with--clueless--co-star-jeremy-sisto-on--suburgatory---exclusive-video-.html) where she is evidently playing herself.

heckles
04-15-2012, 01:24 AM
C'mon moms, you remember that your doctor had to yank your poor kid out of your stinky, slimy nests into this cruel, cold world. A little chewed-up food is hardly a major assault in comparison.

Ajax
04-18-2012, 07:08 PM
Here is an article outlining both the benefits and the risks of this practice:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/should-you-chew-your-childs-food/#axzz1sPtD7ryZ

IceAlisa
04-18-2012, 07:38 PM
The author is pretty clueless. I've read that introduction of commensal bacteria in large numbers in conjunction with cavity-causing bacteria may lead to gum disease and eventual bone loss as the "good" and "bad" bacteria start interacting.

Also, to suggest that chewing food for a child is necessary for introduction of commensal bacteria is ridiculous. It will get in the child's oral cavity without the help of mom's saliva just fine.

Also, we've already established that chewing food for a toddler (while the article talk about infants a whole lot, which is a different stage of development) bit by bit is much less time efficient than using a blender and pureeing food in bulk.

He talks about infants not having this or that digestive enzyme at birth which is why they stay on formula or hopefully, breast milk until they develop said enzymes. So food, pureed or otherwise is not so relevant until closer to 6 months of age. But he mentions it anyway, exposing his own confusion.

This is an example of a little knowledge causing symptoms of Dunning-Kruger. This blogger is hardly a trained medical professional but these days anyone with internet access can pose as an expert. He pushes a version of the paleolithic diet so he would be likely to think that because something is an ancient practice, it's good for you.

Bottomline is, pediatric dentists do NOT recommend this.

heckles
04-19-2012, 05:41 AM
I've read that introduction of commensal bacteria in large numbers in conjunction with cavity-causing bacteria may lead to gum disease and eventual bone loss as the "good" and "bad" bacteria start interacting.


Doesn't Alicia smoke? Wonder if the baby is getting trace amounts of nicotine from his mother's mouth.