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View Full Version : Why won't my hostas plants grow back?



BaileyCatts
03-18-2012, 10:33 PM
I love hostas plants. You plant 'em, you water 'em, ur done. Don't require a lot of upkeep and I've got some that have been at this house for years that are big beautiful plants (well, once they start coming up again in Spring). :lol: Over the last 2-3 I have planted several more, but those didn't come back up again after that initial year I planted them, or maybe just once they did. I clip them every winter to remove the dead leaves, and the ones that were already at my house when I moved in always come back, but the ones I have planted came back maybe once, or not at all. Don't all hostas plants grow back? Am I buying the wrong variety? I want to plant some more this spring and I want to make sure they come back up next year.

I can't believe its March 18th and I'm ready to start yard work! One guy is even cutting his lawn today. It's freaking 80 degrees outside, and I don't exactly live Florida. It should still be winter here! :lol:

nlyoung
03-18-2012, 11:33 PM
I love hostas plants. You plant 'em, you water 'em, ur done. Don't require a lot of upkeep and I've got some that have been at this house for years that are big beautiful plants (well, once they start coming up again in Spring). :lol: Over the last 2-3 I have planted several more, but those didn't come back up again after that initial year I planted them, or maybe just once they did. I clip them every winter to remove the dead leaves, and the ones that were already at my house when I moved in always come back, but the ones I have planted came back maybe once, or not at all. Don't all hostas plants grow back? Am I buying the wrong variety? I want to plant some more this spring and I want to make sure they come back up next year.


Hostas should come back each year once established since they are perennials. Are they less hardy varieties? Your garden store will be able to advise you better of course, but remember even with perennials you can lose them in the first couple of years if you've had a difficult winter, i.e. freezing and thawing are much harder on plants than a really steady cold winter. If you have happy hostas in your garden already you can assume they should do fine, so I'd try again and hope for a better winter season. Good luck!

fluorescein
03-19-2012, 01:55 AM
We have some varieties of hosta that are like weeds and over the years have tried others that are much finickier. A few of those did better when we moved them out of deep shade, one out from under a cedar. A couple we could never make happy. The varigated and super large leaved varieties seem to be tougher to please. Sorry, I guess that's not real helpful...

suep1963
03-19-2012, 02:26 AM
They are a shade loving plant--where are they in your yard? I never clip anything in the fall (mostly because I have mold allergies and fall is bad outside) I've got monster hostas on the north of the house. Black walnut trees kill most plants, so if they are by walnuts, they'll just keep getting smaller each year and disappear.

BaileyCatts
03-19-2012, 06:45 AM
^^ Three of them that didn't come back were in an island under a large bush (HUGE bush, like 10 feet high). But the lower area I keep cut away so there is air flow and it allows both sunlight and shade as the shadows fall. Another area is around a maple tree, again gets both sun and shade from the tree/house as the shadows fall. None of these have come back up. :( Yet my neighbor had some huge ones she wanted to reduce so dug and sectioned part of it off and gave to me. It was just a scrawny little piece and I didn't think it would make it. Planted it and now its a monster. Grew back no problem. Maybe cause I planted that one next to another one and he liked having friends? :D

suep1963
03-19-2012, 04:11 PM
Maple trees can kill off plants too. If you want to plant under a tree, you should get something to make a ring around the tree (like those brick rings--something that has height) and fill the space in with dirt--gives the plant a bit of a cushion.

skatemommy
03-19-2012, 05:00 PM
Deer eat mine down to nothing. Stupid things aren't supposed to like hostas. Squirrels also dig up my bulbs. Kitty isn't scary enough to make them leave my garden alone. My hens & chicks do just fine, boring as they are.

Skate Talker
03-20-2012, 03:44 PM
If you have some very large established Hostas that you know do well you could just split them too for more plants, but perhaps you were looking for more variety. As far as sun and shade go, there are many varieties now with different needs so best to consult the experts. I have some hostas that have become very large and established and others that do all right but don't seem to increase in size from year to year at all - they were not that dense to start so not sure why. I have deer by the bushel full. Last winter the cat alerted me to 6 of them standing around out back having a confab. Always find "evidence" of nocturnal visits too. Most years they leave the hosta alone but every once in a while I will get up one morning and find nothing but cropped stems. I think they are responsible for doing in all my tulips the last few years too. On the whole though, they are less destructive than I would expect.

Actually the most destructive where those stupid giant turkeys some numb nuts let loose to "see what would happen". The day my irises bloomed they came into my garden and shredded all the blooms, then the female sat up in the tree all night and dropped the biggest pile on my lawn. Poor things roamed around for months, stopping traffic as they continually tried to cross the busy highway with their chicks, and creating havoc all over the neighbourhood.

Civic
03-20-2012, 03:51 PM
...Actually the most destructive where those stupid giant turkeys some numb nuts let loose to "see what would happen". The day my irises bloomed they came into my garden and shredded all the blooms, then the female sat up in the tree all night and dropped the biggest pile on my lawn. Poor things roamed around for months, stopping traffic as they continually tried to cross the busy highway with their chicks, and creating havoc all over the neighbourhood...
Where you see a problem, I see a potential opportunity. Free-range turkeys for the taking.;) Brine them before you roast them and they'll make a tasty dinner.

Skate Talker
03-20-2012, 04:07 PM
I would have if I had the stomach for it. I know where my food comes from and I have even eaten Bambi (grown up Bambi), but actually taking matter into my own hands is not something I am yet prepared to do.

FigureSpins
03-20-2012, 04:21 PM
Where you see a problem, I see a potential opportunity. Free-range turkeys for the taking.;) Brine them before you roast them and they'll make a tasty dinner.
Not so fast:

1) Think about what they've been eating alongside the highway and main roads. These aren't free range on a farm - they're eating all sorts of stuff that could be distasteful or toxic to humans, even with brining.

2) Speaking from a friend's experience, city-range turkeys taste nasty.

3) Many of these creatures fall under government protection laws, so you could end up with a very expensive dinner.


Back OT: the rats on stilts eat my hostas every year. I initially blamed the neighbor's lawn service guy until I caught them in the act.