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Jammers
03-17-2012, 11:27 PM
Yeah but the great skaters have been able to do both.

jettasian
03-18-2012, 03:43 AM
Chan's gala number is pretty darn good. Maybe it's not for your taste, that doesn't mean he doesn't have it.

mikeko
03-18-2012, 03:50 AM
It seems some people feel they are entitled to call those who voted for Chan instead of voting for Boitano a bunch of bad jokes. Such arrogance, really.:rolleyes:

ITA. It seems there are some people who are totally intolerant of different opinions, and attack every post they don't agree with.


Something about Chan's skating leaves me cold. He can do all the jumps and other skills but he's just not a great performer.

All I see in Chan's performances is skills. It doesn't make any difference what music he is skating to.

briancoogaert
03-18-2012, 09:30 AM
Something about Chan's skating leaves me cold. He can do all the jumps and other skills but he's just not a great performer. Maybe in time he will become one.
I agree that he is not the most entertaining, but when I watch him, I'm just fascinated by his edges and glide. So I can't take my eyes off of his feet !

judgejudy27
03-18-2012, 10:00 AM
Then that poster's really insulting to compare Patrick Chan to Gracie Gold.


You are right. Gracie lands all her jumps. Insulting to poor Gold to be compared to Chan.

paskatefan
03-18-2012, 11:13 AM
. It seems there are some people who are totally intolerant of different opinions, and attack every post they don't agree with.






Thank you for this comment! Can we be civil at this board, and agree to disagree in a respectful way?

kwanette
03-18-2012, 11:29 AM
I agree that he is not the most entertaining, but when I watch him, I'm just fascinated by his edges and glide. So I can't take my eyes off of his feet !

That is exactly how I feel re: Patrick's skating. His edges and glide are an art form until themselves.

Proustable
03-18-2012, 12:54 PM
More generally, I'd hope that later generations on the whole would be more skilled than earlier ones. Later generations stand on the shoulders of all that came before them. That's called progress. But Galileo isn't any less of a great scientist because he didn't have the Hubble telescope. Jesse Owens isn't lesser than Usain Bolt because the latter can move faster. The best we can do with these polls that go across generations is compare the relative impacts they had and go from there.

I voted for Stoijko. Because I felt bad he was the only one without a vote, but you can definitely say that he made the quad essential and in Canada's murderer's row (which is already a pretty unique run of skaters: Cranston, Orser, Browning, Stoijko, Buttle, and now Chan) he definitely stands out. His profressional impact was minimal (compared to everyone else on the list) and his post-competition impact negligible (ditto), but I think you can argue that his impact on the sport matches someone like Wylie or Eldridge (or Jenkins or Lysacek, though I know very little about Jenkins).

Beyond that - my head says Button, but I haven't actually seen him skate (not even on youtube - I have to admit my interest in skating doesn't really extend before the 70s, and even the 70s don't hold my interest profoundly). But the string of firsts is undeniable, and his impact as a commentator is major. Perhaps the most influential skater on this list.

My heart says Browning. Not only the first quad, but perhaps the most essential male skater from the professional era (from the North Americans). He defines the sport for many Canadians and still demonstrates consumate performances twenty-three years after winning his first world championship.

judgejudy27
03-18-2012, 01:17 PM
Stojko's impact on the sport is far beyond Eldredge. Stojko is the one that pushed the quad trend we saw for years, and still see today. He also brought the topic of the more masculine style of skating vs the more traditional type of artist and its merits to the fore. He was the competitive leader for years as well, and the one other guys all shot for. Eldredge didnt bring anything new to the sport technically or artistically that made any real impact. All he was famous for was good spins, good longevity and consistency in the sport, failing at the Olympics, and placing behind Elvis in all competitions.

While Wylie is a nice skater with excellent artistry I also dont see what his real impact on the sport was per say. I dont think he changed it anyway like Stojko did. I say all that as someone who wasnt a big fan of Elvis's skating.

berthesghost
03-18-2012, 04:29 PM
A joke as he should be higher, or a joke as he shouldn't be on the list?the later. He's still competing and has only 1 world title, the most recent, so how is that an apples to apples comparison to people like Jenkins, Button or Browning? The outcome of the next three years will impact his legacy greatly IMHO. Add that to the ever present problem with these polls: recent skaters always, always outscore pre-80s skaters even if they are far inferior, plus the hype factor. Hence the Gold joke. :lol:

Vash01
03-18-2012, 04:47 PM
Stojko's impact on the sport is far beyond Eldredge. Stojko is the one that pushed the quad trend we saw for years, and still see today. He also brought the topic of the more masculine style of skating vs the more traditional type of artist and its merits to the fore. He was the competitive leader for years as well, and the one other guys all shot for. Eldredge didnt bring anything new to the sport technically or artistically that made any real impact. All he was famous for was good spins, good longevity and consistency in the sport, failing at the Olympics, and placing behind Elvis in all competitions.

While Wylie is a nice skater with excellent artistry I also dont see what his real impact on the sport was per say. I dont think he changed it anyway like Stojko did. I say all that as someone who wasnt a big fan of Elvis's skating.

Well said. Even though I enjoyed watching Wylie's skating very much, I don't see him as an impact maker. Stojko made a huge impact on fs and changed it forever. If not for him, we might not have seen the quad become a part of the SP, and young skaters going for it. With the exception of the 2010 Olympics, the quad has been an important athletic part of mens skating. The other thing I respect Stojko for is that he did not try to become like the past successful skaters. He did not have the kind of body they did, and he invented his own style, and never compromised what he believed in.

jettasian
03-18-2012, 05:14 PM
You are right. Gracie lands all her jumps. Insulting to poor Gold to be compared to Chan.

And now you just show your true colour toward Chan. Haters gonna hate, right?

Teenes
03-18-2012, 05:59 PM
The definition of "greatest" seems rather open to interpretation, which makes this kind of poll necessarily subjective.

For me, it's between Button and Browning.

Dick Button has an undeniable legacy and huge impact in the sport. His string of titles, his technical firsts, his long-standing role as the voice of figure skating in the US, the founding of Candid Productions and the professional competitions which helped so many skaters continue to develop themselves and keep in the public eye long after they turned pro...His continued role as an advocate and promoter of the sport so long after he's left the ice himself... However, the main problem for me voting for him is I've never seen him *skate*, and if we're voting for "greatest skater", that's a rather vital component for me.

Kurt Browning, on the other hand, may not have the business or production inclinations to found a company or tour or series of competitions, but he has a fair record himself. Lack of Olympic medals notwithstanding, he's got the four World titles (and one silver), four Canadian titles, three World Pro titles, and a reasonable collection of firsts (first quad, first to do 2 3-axels in the original program, first to do the 3 sal/3 loop combo, first to do 3 3-3 combos in one program, first to win Novice, Junior, and Senior Canadian championships, only person to win Worlds with and without figures). He's a commentator, a mentor to younger skaters, a choreographer for competitive skaters and now for the Stars on Ice tour, a skater many other skaters have cited as a major influence ... But records and impact aside, I voted for him because of his skating. He's a skater who started off being known as the jumping bean while his others were considered to be the "artistic" ones, yet who is probably remembered more now for his artistry and performance quality. Eighteen years after turning pro, he still skates in 50+ shows a year worldwide, and continues to experiment and push himself creatively. IMO he's been the most versatile skater over the course of his career, the guy who landed a quad in performance 10 years after landing the first one, yet also created a jumpless program (Nyah) that is widely revered. He can convincingly play the clown who can't control his limbs or the modern dancer with utter command over his entire body. His footwork is 2nd to none - he can do things in his skates most people can't do in their shoes.

So yeah, longevity, creativity, versatility, technical ability, competitive record, advocacy for the sport, impact on other skaters...had to go with Browning. But if I'd seen Button skate, maybe my vote would be different.

I do have to say, if we're talking *impact* on the sport, I'm surprised Hamilton and Boitano don't have more votes, especially since in the US, at least, I'm pretty sure more people have heard of the two of them than anyone else on this list. Hamilton more for off-ice stuff like commentary, founding Stars on Ice, etc, and Boitano more for on-ice stuff like raising the bar technically in the professional world, spearheading that whole movement to allow pros into the Olympics, his skating tours/shows, and his longevity...

snoopysnake
03-19-2012, 06:42 PM
Kurt... I'm an edge slut.

This must become a new rep level.

MrLucky
03-19-2012, 06:48 PM
Toller Cranston......one of the all-time greats!