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View Full Version : What are the options for Ksenia Makarova ?



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SamuraiK
02-24-2012, 06:51 PM
If she still loves skating and wants to continue, I say go on. She's still good enough to survive for years in the elite level (grand prix) without making it to euros/world teams. Look at Ashley Wagner, last time she was a in senior championship was FOUR! seasons ago. Elena Sokolova also was ignored for a whole olympic cycle before resurfacing once the top names of that era retired. So it's still possible :)

alij
02-24-2012, 07:26 PM
Last word from Piseev was that the Russian Fed will decide after Jr. Worlds. Shelepen's announcement that she was chosen to replace Makarova has been removed from her social media.

Ah I had missed that turn of events, will be interesting to see what actually happens

Nomad
02-25-2012, 05:56 AM
If she still loves skating and wants to continue, I say go on. She's still good enough to survive for years in the elite level (grand prix) without making it to euros/world teams. Look at Ashley Wagner, last time she was a in senior championship was FOUR! seasons ago. Elena Sokolova also was ignored for a whole olympic cycle before resurfacing once the top names of that era retired. So it's still possible :)

I wouldn't say that Cupcake was ignored by the RF between 98 and 02. She failed to make the national podium in those years (finishing 4-6) but she still got 18 international assignments (mostly GP events) and brought home 11 medals. I think the RF started to write her off in 01, when she bombed SA and finished 4th at CoR and RN. She got one GP in 02 (NHK, 6th place) and that might have been it for Sokolova had she not defeated an ailing Slutskaya at the 03 Russian Nats. She won some medals here and there after that, but after bombing in Torino, then losing Russian Nats to Doronina and bombing at Euros and Worlds in 07, I think Piseev retired her.

blue_idealist
02-25-2012, 05:47 PM
I don't think she should retire. I think if she does better her jumps, she might have a chance. She COULD go back to skating for the US, but I don't know if she's going to have it any easier there than in Russia. Maybe a little easier, since the top US ladies have been quite inconsistent in recent years. If she had a good day, and they had bad days or so-so days, she could probably win US Nats over any of them (Alissa, Ashley - unless she keeps going like she is *crosses fingers*, Mirai, Caroline, Agnes, etc.). However, if they skated well and she bombed, she could get buried in the standings.

Vash01
02-25-2012, 06:13 PM
A question: If Ksenia decides to skate for the US instead of Russia, will she still have to sit out until 2014, and does it mean after the 2014 Olympic season or before it (meaning can she compete at the 2014 US nationals)?

RFOS
02-25-2012, 06:19 PM
A question: If Ksenia decides to skate for the US instead of Russia, will she still have to sit out until 2014, and does it mean after the 2014 Olympic season or before it (meaning can she compete at the 2014 US nationals)?

If she wanted to and qualified, I think she could compete at 2013 U.S. Nationals, she just wouldn't be able to compete internationally for the U.S. The ISU "sit out" rules don't govern national competitions. Some skaters have even competed at 2 different Nationals in the same season (for example, Patrick Myzyk for Canada and Poland last year).

victoriaheidi
02-26-2012, 12:11 AM
A question: If Ksenia decides to skate for the US instead of Russia, will she still have to sit out until 2014, and does it mean after the 2014 Olympic season or before it (meaning can she compete at the 2014 US nationals)?

On one hand, we have people arguing that she couldn't even beat the top two in Canada; on the other, we're moving her to the US?

judgejudy27
02-26-2012, 02:04 AM
When someone said she would get the Soldatova treament if she switched countries, how is that a bad thing. Maybe it was for Soldatova in a way as she a former World medalist who dropped to the teens. However Makarova was never one of the top skaters in the World, and would be happy to just get to compete at events like Worlds and the Olympics again. Also the Russian federation isnt even powerful anymore so it is unlikely they could inluence her results much, especialy under COP. She probably wouldnt place that high at the World level but she never really did to begin with.

Vash01
02-26-2012, 02:53 AM
On one hand, we have people arguing that she couldn't even beat the top two in Canada; on the other, we're moving her to the US?

I am assuming that she will improve. That's not so unrealistic, is it? She is only 19.

judgejudy27
02-26-2012, 03:10 AM
Moving to the U.S would not be a good idea for Makarova. The U.S has alot of strong girls her age or younger and she isnt currently better than any of them, nor does her long range potential look better. No way she would be making the U.S Sochi team with Wagner, Gold, Zhang, Nagasu, Czisny, and Zawadzki all in her way. An imported Russian who at 19 doesnt even have a triple lutz would get buried amongst that group. Trying for a lesser Soviet republic would be better.

kwanfan1818
02-26-2012, 03:14 AM
Canada seems like a long shot, since she doesn't have ties to the country and wouldn't be helping a Canadian citizen compete, and she'd need to be granted permanent residency based on being a self-employed World Class athlete and then expedited citizenship. Alexe and Piper Gilles should be able to get Canadian citizenship through their mother, once their mother establishes it through her mother, the girls' grandmother, and Alexe Gilles would add in another skater shooting for limited spots, especially were she to train with someone who could help her gain confidence.

Makarova should be able to compete in Sochi, if her last international competition for Russia is 2012 Euros, since Sochi is more than two years later. She'd need citizenship in another country, though, and to qualify.

If Makarova has US citizenship, or is in the process of getting it now, then the US might be possible, although with a rejuvenated Zhang, it would be tough, even were there to be a third spot for US Ladies.

Vash01
02-26-2012, 03:30 AM
We had given up on so many US ladies- Ashley, Alissa, Caroline, Rachael. They all seemed to put it all together at the most recent US nationals. There is no reason to believe that Ksenia will not make any improvements with proper coaching and practice. Did we give up on Caroline and Alissa a few years ago? Rachael is the only one I don't expect to see big improvements from.

judgejudy27
02-26-2012, 03:38 AM
Alissa from 2007 until today was always the strongest U.S lady if she skated cleanly, which is why she was always had a chance to win in the U.S if skated well. Her spins, spirals, and artistry were superior to everyone else, so she pretty much always controlled her own destiny, she either gave it away or she took it (sometimes even with mistakes she was placed 1st or 2nd, as long as not too many like 2008 or 2010).

The U.S women were extremely weak the past 4-5 years which is why you see so much shuffling in the standings. With Wagner becoming an elite skater, Gold emerging, Zhangs comeback, and Nagasu, Agnes, and Alissa all with huge potential if they put it together, things will not be so easy in the coming years. When Bebe Liang and Emily Hughes were making Worlds, and Czisny was winning Nationals with 3 triples, it would have been a good time for Makarova to try and make it in the U.S. That period has passed.

kwanfan1818
02-26-2012, 03:42 AM
The main difference is that the US doesn't have Sotnikova, Lipnitskaya, Shelepen, Korobeynikova, Tukhtamisheva, or Biryukova coming up the ranks behind Wagner, Czisny, or Zhang. Many of these Ladies have beaten the US juniors repeatedly, and Tuktamisheva did very well on the GP against the seniors.

It's not that Makarova can't improve, but that the competition for a spot for Russia is more formidable.

judgejudy27
02-26-2012, 05:45 AM
I agree she would have more chance in the U.S than in Russia, but she doesnt have a chance in either really IMO. She would be best trying to get citizenship in a smaller Soviet republic or switching disciplines.