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Erin
09-03-2012, 03:31 AM
So I know I'm about two months behind, but I just finished reading Gone Girl, which I basically couldn't put down. Finished it 6 hours after starting, with only some short breaks to pick up some groceries and make supper. Good thing that I started it early in the day!

Loved the book, although I do agree with the posts earlier in the thread that the ending dragged out a bit too long. As for how I felt about the ending itself, I wouldn't exactly call it satisfying, but I can't really think of any more suitable ending for the book. And I think Reese Witherspoon would make the absolute perfect Amy - the comparison to Tracy Flick is bang on. I can just imagine Reese asking us if we liked Diary Amy.

puglover
09-03-2012, 02:47 PM
I thought "Gone Girl" was quite the engrossing story as well. The writing really grabbed me and I found it interesting that there was so much relatable in a terrible, poisonous relationship.

zaphyre14
09-04-2012, 03:01 PM
Having finished the life of Nell Gwynn, I jumped genres into "Libriomancer" by Jim. C. Hines, the first in his new series about magic-wielding librarians, vampires, dryads and Johannes Gutenburg's automatons in modern-day Michegan. :) I'm a little confused in places about who's possessing whom and who's on which side of the good/evil line but it's been an easy read and the literary references have been fun.

Next in the TBR pile is "Shakespear Undead."

PrincessLeppard
09-04-2012, 04:12 PM
I liked Shakespeare Undead.

I just finished The Drowned Cities, which is the sequel to Shipbreaker. The story was interesting, but to me the most interesting story was sort of glossed over and the main character spent entirely too much time dithering.

I thought the author made some good points about the power and folly of inflammatory rhetoric, but I'm sure most of it will be lost on the YA crowd. Which is a shame, given the current political climate.

Prancer
09-04-2012, 06:56 PM
Prancer and I have a love/hate relationship with Reacher. Prancer really loves him. :D

:mad: But I will still read his insults to my intelligence as long as I don't have to pay for them.


If you thought the first chapter was bad...good thing you never reached the "whaling chapter" in which Melville describes different types of whales in endless detail. :scream:

I kind of liked Moby Dick, but there were places where reading it was like wading through cold molasses.

A friend of mine is a Melville specialist and she always likes to tell students that even Melville thought the book was boring :lol:.


I liked Shakespeare Undead.

That reminds me, I have a book for you--Zombie, Ohio. (http://www.amazon.com/Zombie-Ohio-A-Tale-Undead/dp/1616082062) Someone recommended it to me because the protagonist zombie is an English professor at a thinly disguised Kenyon College and they thought I would like that. Not my thing, but I thought, "Hmm, who do I know who might like this?"

Ajax
09-04-2012, 07:25 PM
I'm currently reading "Feed" by Mira Grant and LOVING IT. A book about the zombie apocalypse that is entirely earnest without a smidge of camp. Yeah, it's as weird as it sounds, and also fabulous.

PrincessLeppard
09-04-2012, 07:39 PM
:
That reminds me, I have a book for you--Zombie, Ohio. (http://www.amazon.com/Zombie-Ohio-A-Tale-Undead/dp/1616082062) Someone recommended it to me because the protagonist zombie is an English professor at a thinly disguised Kenyon College and they thought I would like that. Not my thing, but I thought, "Hmm, who do I know who might like this?"

*adds to list*


I'm currently reading "Feed" by Mira Grant and LOVING IT. A book about the zombie apocalypse that is entirely earnest without a smidge of camp. Yeah, it's as weird as it sounds, and also fabulous.

I love that book. I recommend it to my students who also love zombies.

Artemis@BC
09-04-2012, 10:26 PM
I finished Sacré Bleu, Christopher Moore's latest. It's about Paris (or, specifically, Montmartre), in 1890 at the very beginning of the La Belle Époque. It starts with the suicide of Vincent Van Gogh ... except it wasn't suicide. Part murder mystery, part art history, and because it's Moore, lots of comedy, sex (Toulouse-Lautrec is one of the central characters after all), and a good dose of fantasy and mysticism thrown in for good measure.

One of the neatest elements of the book is that it's illustrated with various paintings from the era captioned by bits of dialogue from the story, often with hilarious results.

I'm now tackling All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren, from my list of classics-I-somehow-never-got-around-to-reading. I'm alternating between loving and being frustrated by the pages of poetic imagery and description, but I think I've learned to spot which bits I can gloss over if need be.

The edition I'm reading is the "restored version," rather than the version originally published. It includes the originally publised first chapter for comparison -- and I gotta say, I think the editors did their job very well back then. The 1946 version is much cleaner and hooks the reader right away. Something that cannot be said for the "restored" version!

Artemis@BC
09-04-2012, 10:28 PM
I thought "Gone Girl" was quite the engrossing story as well. The writing really grabbed me and I found it interesting that there was so much relatable in a terrible, poisonous relationship.

I think that's what's making this book so successful. It takes the small, everyday relationship wrinkles we all experience ... and magnifies them 100x. Aside from the relatability, I think we're breathing a sigh of relief that we're not partnered to either Amy or Nick!

rfisher
09-06-2012, 02:14 AM
All my fellow Potter fans need to read Ben Aaronovitch's Midnight Riot. To quote one reviewer, "Midnight Riot is what would happen if Harry Potter grew up and joined the fuzz. A hilarous, keenly imagined caper."

It is funny and there are tons of HP references that crack me up. It's about a young police constable who ends up being an apprentice wizard, except unlike Harry Potter, as he tells a colleague, he's real and not fiction. There are even Voldemort references. :cheer2: I think he's got 3 books in the series. Midnight Riot is the first. This is sooooo much better than that stupid the Magicians. Funny, rude and doesn't take itself seriously.

galaxygirl
09-06-2012, 02:42 AM
All my fellow Potter fans need to read Ben Aaronovitch's Midnight Riot. To quote one reviewer, "Midnight Riot is what would happen if Harry Potter grew up and joined the fuzz. A hilarous, keenly imagined caper."

It is funny and there are tons of HP references that crack me up. It's about a young police constable who ends up being an apprentice wizard, except unlike Harry Potter, as he tells a colleague, he's real and not fiction. There are even Voldemort references. :cheer2: I think he's got 3 books in the series. Midnight Riot is the first. This is sooooo much better than that stupid the Magicians. Funny, rude and doesn't take itself seriously.

I had checked this out from the library a while back but it was a mass market paperback with small print so I returned it without reading it. I just checked the library's ebook website and the first two books are available so back on Mount TBR it goes!