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galaxygirl
08-27-2012, 01:18 AM
I just finished Rules of Civility. I enjoyed it for the most part, though I did get bogged down in the middle. I actually enjoyed the ending more than the rest of the book which is unusual for me. I think I got bogged down due to the subject matter rather than the writing. I really like the way Towles writes and can't wait to read his next book.


I haven't read A Song of Ice and Fire, but my brother is obsessed with it.



I read that and now I rather regret it. It will probably be a couple of years before the next installment comes out and even then it won't be finished. Just something to keep in mind.

I read A Game of Thrones before the second book came out and loved it so of course I bought the second book in hardcover as soon as it came out. I gave up after a few pages because I couldn't remember enough details to continue reading (well, I probably could have finished it but I didn't want to have to 'read over' the stuff I didn't understand due to not remembering what happened in the first book). I'm waiting until the final book is released and then I'll re-read the first one and finish the rest of the series.

rjblue
08-27-2012, 02:31 AM
So here are my options:
Terry Pratchett Discworld series
Philip Jose Farmer Riverworld series
Frank Herbert Dune series
Tolkien Lord of the Rings trilogy plus Silmarillion and the Hobbit
George R.R. Martin A Song of Ice and Fire
Margaret Thatcher's autobiographical books (The path to power and The Downing Street years)
Agatha Christie's Poirot and Marple series (though I almost finished reading Marple by now)
Hunger Games trilogy (people say that I made a wrong choice of buying girlish books at the age of 33) :)

I am really at a loss now, I think I shouldn't have bought so many books, but I couldn't stop.
I loved Lord of the Rings when I was a teenager. I read it three times. I don't know if I could re-read it now.

I just read the first Riverworld book, and I quite enjoyed it and I think it lived up to it's reviews.

I've never made it past the first few chapters of an Agatha Christie novel, and I don't read autobiographys in general, so I wouldn't choose those in any case.

Dune is on my list for to-read.

I read The Hunger Games trilogy, and found the first one really enjoyable, the second good, and the third I read just to finish the story. I vote you choose this series, because it's quick and easy to read and will get you started through your stack quickly.

rfisher
08-27-2012, 02:37 AM
I love LOTR. I've listened to it multiple times on audio. :) The section with the Hobbits in the Old Forest meeting Tom Bombadill is a bit tedious, but once they get out of there, it's exciting. I still don't know why Tolkien included all that. I've read his reasons, but I still don't think it was necessary even with all his prequels and lengthy history of Middle Earth. You truly have to be a LOTR fan to get through all the appendixes. I've only made it through those once. I loved the Hobbit the best because of the humor.

FarFarAway
08-27-2012, 05:05 AM
Thanks everyone for the advices! :) They really helped me to place the books I want to read in the order which seems right to me.

I started with Tolkien in fact, then I will continue with the Hunger Games, then Dune and after that return to Agatha Christie's series.

I have to say that I actually love Silmarillion (and I love all those appendixes about the pronunciation, place names, genealogy etc:D), it's quite an interesting story to read and helps me really to understand better who is who in the movies. The language is very hard to get used to, though, but I don't have any problems understanding it. It's just a bit hard switching to The Silmarillion after Agatha Christie.

After finishing with Silmarillion, Hobbit and LOTR trilogy and I think I need to rewatch the movies again.

Nomad
08-28-2012, 02:52 AM
Finished Blow Your House Down this evening. The fourth and last part felt a bit tacked on to me. Still, it was something I won't soon forget; I certainly won't be passing any moral judgements on women who have to resort to prostitution in order to survive, or feed their children. Not for the faint of heart, that's for sure.

dinakt
08-28-2012, 05:37 AM
Has anyone ever read Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged and the Fountainhead? I recieved these today, so they are on the list too. :)

I've read the Fountainhead in college; read it rather fast and with interest and immediately became a passionate anti- Ayn- Rander:lol:
That said, it is worth reading her novels to understand what the fuss is about. Especially as we the Russkies understand where she came from.

dinakt
08-28-2012, 05:49 AM
Hi, everyone. :) I think I need a piece of advice. It seemed to me sometime ago that I wasn't reading enough, so I decided work on that and, as a result, I have now a problem of choice :)

So here are my options:
Terry Pratchett Discworld series
Philip Jose Farmer Riverworld series
Frank Herbert Dune series
Tolkien Lord of the Rings trilogy plus Silmarillion and the Hobbit
George R.R. Martin A Song of Ice and Fire
Margaret Thatcher's autobiographical books (The path to power and The Downing Street years)
Agatha Christie's Poirot and Marple series (though I almost finished reading Marple by now)
Hunger Games trilogy (people say that I made a wrong choice of buying girlish books at the age of 33) :)

I am really at a loss now, I think I shouldn't have bought so many books, but I couldn't stop.
Cool list! A lot depends on whether you love long yarns with overwhelming detail.
Hunger Games- a very fast read; I think one has to be a teen to truly love it ( though not necessarily a girl). Enjoyable. I prefer Harry Potter.
LOTR- I personally adore it. It's poetic, it has adventure and it has soul. It's also sloooow and nerdy.
Dune- even more nerdy. It was a tough going for me, though I love sci-fi. To put a label on it, it's more "guy literature". Dune has a tremendous ( and very smart) following.
Christie is 3-in-the-morning popcorn with a shot of adrenaline.
Martin- I have a love/hate relationship with him. The first 3 books I loved. Book #4 ad #5 I resented- first it got too diluted, then too graphic and violent. Now we wait for something like 10 years for it to conclude. Still, if you are into epic fantasy, it is top- notch.
Don't know the rest.
Good reading!

Marge_Simpson
08-29-2012, 06:13 AM
One of my coworkers, knowing my fondness for foreign films, recommended "I'm Not Scared" (Io non ho paura), which blew me away. after seeing in the credits that it was based on the book by Niccolo Ammaniti, I borrowed the book from the library. Normally I hate translated novels because there always seems to be something lacking, but this one is very well done (albeit seems to be translated into British English rather than American.) Having already seen the film there were no surprises regarding the ending, but I was enchanted with the writing. I can only guess how much better it reads in Italian. It's a fairly short book and I read it straight through. Definitely recommended!

Nomad
08-30-2012, 01:40 AM
^ I read that in the original. I remember it as being pretty intense and very visual - i.e., I could see the movie in my head as I read it. (And I've never seen the movie.) And you're right about translated fiction. Literary translation is fiendishly difficult. I love Grazia Deledda, for example, but I don't recommend her to people because most of her English translations have been done by Martha King, who seems to go for a very literal approach and in the process, loses the stark poetry of Deledda's prose style. Antonia White's translations of Colette, on the other hand, are wonderful, although I think this is in part because White herself was an accomplished novelist and not just an academic like King.

zaphyre14
08-30-2012, 12:55 PM
I just started Gillian Bagwell's "The Darling Strumpet" a novel about the life of Nell Gwynn, mistress of England's King Charles II. Someone (I think, Prancer?) recommended in one book thread or another; I noted in my Books To Look For notebook and finally ran across a copy over the weekend. It's pretty interesting so far and a departure from the modern-day paranormals and mysteries I've been immersed in recently.

Nomad
08-31-2012, 04:33 AM
^ I'd like to read that. I always loved the anecdote about Nell's carriage being stoned by angry, anti-Catholic Londoners who thought it belonged Louise de Kéroualle, Charles II's French mistress. Nell made the driver stop, stuck her head out the window, and shouted, "Pray, good people, be civil, I am the Protestant whore!" And they desisted. :lol:

After two grim (but really good) novels in a row, I want something light and amusing, so it's back to E. M. Delafield's Provincial Lady series.

IceAlisa
08-31-2012, 07:58 AM
Finished the Annotated Emma--fun!

Now I have started one of the Christies: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. And so a question came up: what is vegetable marrow? Monsieur Poirot was fond of cultivating them.

When I Google it, a kind of squash comes up. Do Brits call it "vegetable marrow"? Or does everyone? What a bizarre name, no offense to the Brits.

zaphyre14
08-31-2012, 02:06 PM
^ I'd like to read that. I always loved the anecdote about Nell's carriage being stoned by angry, anti-Catholic Londoners who thought it belonged Louise de Kéroualle, Charles II's French mistress. Nell made the driver stop, stuck her head out the window, and shouted, "Pray, good people, be civil, I am the Protestant whore!" And they desisted. :lol:

After two grim (but really good) novels in a row, I want something light and amusing, so it's back to E. M. Delafield's Provincial Lady series.

I haven't gotten that far - Nell's just beginning her acting career, after having risen from oyster-hawker to whore to orange-seller. A remarkable number of people around her have died though.

I'm working my way through audios of the Alex Cross mysetries in the car and have "Pop Goes The Weasel" going now. It's pretty good but I really don't care for knowing who the killer is and how he conducts his murders in such detail. If I were reading this in print, I'd be skipping those pages.

Artemis@BC
08-31-2012, 07:48 PM
Now I have started one of the Christies: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. And so a question came up: what is vegetable marrow? Monsieur Poirot was fond of cultivating them.

When I Google it, a kind of squash comes up. Do Brits call it "vegetable marrow"? Or does everyone? What a bizarre name, no offense to the Brits.

More frequently just "marrow." The term "vegetable marrow" would normally only be used if it were necessary to differentiate from animal bone marrow.

They also use the French names for eggplant (aubergine) and zucchini (courgette). And rocket or rockette instead of arugula.

But it's all English. :D

michiruwater
08-31-2012, 11:16 PM
Well, after finishing Gatsby I started on the complete collected short stories of one of my father's two heroes, Flannery O'Connor (the other being Hemingway), starting with 'A Good Man Is Hard To Find,' which was quite different from anything else I think I've ever read :lol: I think this will be interesting.