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IceAlisa
07-31-2012, 05:32 AM
I recently finished The Provincial Lady In Russia, it was fun. You turned me on to Delafield, thank you, love her.

Still reading Kirino's Grotesque. It's really brilliant IMO, very noir, very blunt and heartless, very bare prose, almost Hemingway-like and very powerful. If I were a teaching a class on feminism, I'd assign her work.

zaphyre14
07-31-2012, 12:45 PM
I finally collected all three volumes of Darynda Jones Grim Reaper series and just finished "First Grave on the Right." II'd call it paranormal chick lit :) - the main character sees dead people and is supposed to be their portal to the hereafter. She also works as a PI, providing her Uncle Bob the Cop with insider information on murder cases. The writing style is somehat chaotic (explained by the narrator's ADD) and some of the dialog seems a bit too witty to my ears, but I've enjoyed it. Plus I want to find out who the mysterious Reyes is. #2 is "Second Grave on the Left" and #3 is "Third Grave Dead Ahead." Good summer reading and a shift from the ever-present Vampire Fiction out there.

PrincessLeppard
07-31-2012, 02:18 PM
A friend of mine was raving about a book called Nineteen Minutes so I headed over to Barnes & Noble to check it out because it sounded interesting.

So I get to bookstore and find out it's by Jodi effing Picoult. But I had a red velvet cupcake and read the beginning and it seemed okay, so I got it.

I was up pretty late reading it last night, and other than a few quibbles (in what school do kids have lunch second period? Even in a block schedule, that's like 9:45 am, you know? and also the DEEP DARK SECRET that is never as deep and dark as the writer thinks that you think it will be) it's a pretty good story.

skatesindreams
07-31-2012, 08:05 PM
There is a great musical called Striking 12 (http://www.groovelily.com/musicals/striking-12/) that involves a guy reading The Little Match Girl on new year's eve - there's a whole song devoted to how wacked out Hans Christian Andersen was - the song is called "Screwed Up People Make Great Art" :lol:

Those stories were intended as "moral exemplars" for adults - not for children.
Many of the well-known "artistes" of the day seem to have been "disturbed".
What was it about the era, which made it so?

genevieve
07-31-2012, 08:44 PM
I was up pretty late reading it last night, and other than a few quibbles (in what school do kids have lunch second period? Even in a block schedule, that's like 9:45 am, you know? and also the DEEP DARK SECRET that is never as deep and dark as the writer thinks that you think it will be) it's a pretty good story.
When I was in 10th grade I had lunch 4th period - which was 10:15am. By the end of the day (which was around 5pm because we didn't have a scheduled gym class and we all had to participate in afterschool sports to make up for it) I was STAR! VING!

michiruwater
07-31-2012, 10:27 PM
Some girls I knew who went to the really big schools downstate like Saline and Plymouth-Canton would talk about how they had lunch at 10 AM when they were freshmen (one girl had lunch at 9:30 AM - WHAT?) and I was always horrified. How anyone can justify given a child a lunch where they're guaranteed to be hungry before school even ends is beyond me. We had lunch between 11 and noon from Early 4s to graduation, but only my elementary school had to stagger it.

oleada
08-01-2012, 10:38 PM
I finished Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt today. I have mixed feelings on it. On the one hand, it's beautifully written and the characterization is painfully real. On the other hand, I felt the plot left something to be desired.

Now off to read The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Steadman, which was a Spinner rec.

PrincessLeppard
08-02-2012, 02:55 AM
Spinner recommendation = no zombies. Or mayhem. Or body parts strewn about.

PDilemma
08-02-2012, 03:39 AM
When I was in 10th grade I had lunch 4th period - which was 10:15am. By the end of the day (which was around 5pm because we didn't have a scheduled gym class and we all had to participate in afterschool sports to make up for it) I was STAR! VING!

When I was a freshman, some people had lunch third period which started about 9:50 a.m.

They changed the lunch schedules the next year.

Nomad
08-02-2012, 03:41 AM
I recently finished The Provincial Lady In Russia, it was fun. You turned me on to Delafield, thank you, love her.
...

You are quite welcome. :) Persephone has recently reissued one of Delafield's early works, Consequences:

"Like Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians, written at the same time, Consequences is a scream of horror against Victorian values; however, its ironic tone cannot disguise EM Delafield's deeply compassionate and feminist stance."

And speaking of Stracheys, you might like niece Julia Strachey's Cheerful Weather for the Wedding.

I am now also rereading Jean Rhys's Good Morning, Midnight, which is in many ways the antithesis of Diary of a Provincial Lady. I'd actually bought the book for a friend, but as I was flipping through it I noticed that none of the phrases (or sentences, or entire songs) in French had been translated. No footnotes, no glossary. Now I'm putting together a glossary so my non-French speaking friend can enjoy the book without having to attempt translating all the French bits herself. Alternating between the Pernod-soaked despair of GMM and the genteel snark of DPL is a little odd.

Michalle
08-02-2012, 04:44 AM
I can't remember who first recommended Elizabeth Taylor on this thread, but I loved "At Mrs. Lippincote's," so thank you!

Wyliefan
08-02-2012, 05:00 AM
You are quite welcome. :) Persephone has recently reissued one of Delafield's early works, Consequences:

Persephone is an awesome publisher. I discovered Monica Dickens through them, as well as Noel Streatfeild's Saplings.

Nomad
08-02-2012, 05:55 AM
I can't remember who first recommended Elizabeth Taylor on this thread, but I loved "At Mrs. Lippincote's," so thank you!

I read that last June; can't remember if I mentioned it in this thread or not, however. Anyway, I can recommend Palladian and Angel to you, and if you're a Bronte fan, keep an eye out for the Bronte references as you read!

ETA: You might also like The Gentlewomen by Laura Talbot.

Spinner
08-02-2012, 05:09 PM
Now off to read The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Steadman, which was a Spinner rec.

Yay! It's an emotional read, and I mean more than just tearfulness at the end (which I had). There are parts where you want to just shake Isabel and smack another female character, which to me is a sign the writer did her job. ;)

And PL can suck it. :P

oleada
08-02-2012, 11:25 PM
Spinner recommendation = no zombies. Or mayhem. Or body parts strewn about.

Well, I'm not a zombie fan so it works out. :P

Yay! It's an emotional read, and I mean more than just tearfulness at the end (which I had). There are parts where you want to just shake Isabel and smack another female character, which to me is a sign the writer did her job.

I stayed up too late last night and I'm on part 3. I want to smack Isabel! And I don't know who the other female character is but I have an idea. :P