PDA

View Full Version : Libro filum--the book thread



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 [57] 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

modern_muslimah
07-27-2012, 05:18 PM
I just finished The Translator by Leila Aboulela. As with her other novels, I really enjoyed it.

So, I am going to take the plunge and read Gone Girl. I don't usually do thriller/mystery novels but it has received so much praise both in this thread and in the media that I want to read it.

mkats
07-27-2012, 07:29 PM
Well, anyone remember the original Little Mermaid, not the Disney animated film? Or The Little Matchgirl? HC Andersen could be level 4 depressing. Or there was one tale about a mother who chased Death because it carried off her child but when Death showed the mother how bad the child's life would be should he survive, the mother just let the child go. The end. Night night, kiddies.

Now I understand why my Swedish cousin is so messed up. :lol:

rfisher
07-27-2012, 07:56 PM
Those cheap ebooks add up quickly. :yikes: I've cut myself off. I have to see if the local library is a possibility, although, most of the ebooks I've seen listed aren't actually available. :rolleyes: I thought the whole thing with ereaders was instant gratification. Harumph.

IceAlisa
07-27-2012, 07:59 PM
Now I understand why my Swedish cousin is so messed up. :lol:

Lack of sunlight+vodka belt=depressing literature. Where I come from it's just vodka belt=depressing literature.

oleada
07-27-2012, 11:27 PM
I've started reading "Tell the Wolves I'm Home" and even though I'm only a few chapters in, it's riveting.

Erin
07-28-2012, 11:30 PM
Those cheap ebooks add up quickly. :yikes:

Better cheap e-books than not-so-cheap e-books and regular books. My vacation seems to have caused some temporary insanity on this front. I started off well, with a few books from the library - first, The Romanovs: The Final Chapter which went a little too far into minute detail about the finding/verification of the Romanov bones in the mid-90s and also the Anna Andserson saga. But still interesting, especially having read Nicholas and Alexandra by the same author earlier. Also from the library, The King's Speech by Mark Logue (Lionel's grandson), which was very enjoyable - I had thought it would be a re-tread of the movie, but it provided a lot more detail and interesting background to the story. And it makes me want to go back and watch the movie, even with all the licenses it takes.

Then while hanging out in Helsinki, I picked up a hard copy of the Annotated Pride & Prejudice...which I absolutely loved, so much so that I have now ordered the versions of Sense & Sensibility, Persuasion, and even Emma (my least favourite Austen) because the annotated version increased my appreciation of P&P so much that I want to repeat the experience with the others. And as much as I love e-books, these are less suited for the format, so they're all old school. Then in Berlin, I discovered The Remains of the Day, which I've been unable to buy as an e-book, so I picked it up hard copy. And I also ordered a hard copy of I Capture the Castle (where I had the e-book version but it cuts off halfway through). I don't know where I will put all of these books or that it was the best use of my money, but I guess I'll focus on how much I'll enjoy reading them and try to forget the rest.

immoimeme
07-29-2012, 09:34 AM
"god's little acre" finally arrived. now i know why no one reads it any more. "living downtown" was v gd. back to my big picture bk titled "waves"-it makes me feel slightly cooler--emphasis on slightly!

IceAlisa
07-29-2012, 10:00 AM
What? There are annotated versions of the Austens other than P&P??? I must own them. It was like discovering the novel all over again.

I am really enjoying my second book by Natsuo Kirino, Grotesque although, like the first one by Kirino I've read, Out, it's rather terrifying. Instead of violence, it's a very intimate look into the minds of teenage girls, just as scary.

Erin
07-29-2012, 11:23 PM
What? There are annotated versions of the Austens other than P&P??? I must own them. It was like discovering the novel all over again.

Yes, the three I mentioned all have annotated versions by the same editor as P&P. And that's a great description of why I liked it so much, which is why I ordered them up so quick. I would have bought them on my vacation if I thought I had any room in my suitcase. I'm hoping that he's working on doing Mansfield Park and Northanger Abbey as well. And if it wouldn't be too much to ask, maybe some of Austen's shorter and/or unfinished works? (Although, that reminds me of my one quibble with the annotated P&P - he kept referring to Lady Susan as "unfinished" when it was clearly finished, just more of a novella rather than a full novel.)

Michalle
07-29-2012, 11:37 PM
If you haven't seen it, Erin, the movie version of I Capture the Castle (I assume it's the same thing) is really great.

PrincessLeppard
07-29-2012, 11:40 PM
So, if anyone is looking for some :smokin: erotica, Ravenous by Abagail Barnette is hawt.

warning: it has some male/male scenes as well, so if that is not your thing, this is not the book for you. But I liked it. :grope:

Abagail Barnette is the pen name for the fabulous Jennifer Armintrout, who does the hilarious and spot on recaps of the 50 Shades "books."

Erin
07-30-2012, 12:27 AM
If you haven't seen it, Erin, the movie version of I Capture the Castle (I assume it's the same thing) is really great.

It is the same thing, and I agree that it's great - that's what inspired me to read the book. I do that a lot, where I see a movie that I like and then seek out the book on the assumption that it will be even better (and probably is about 80% of the time).

Speaking of books I read because of the movie, I finished The Remains of the Day, which was very good. Very similar in tone and structure to Never Let Me Go, also by Ishiguro. Reading it makes me want to see the movie again, but it was amazing how perfectly I could picture Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins as I was reading, even though I haven't seen the movie in years. I was a little surprised to discover that the book was written in first person from Stevens's point of view, because in the movie, it is so much clearer to understand what Miss Kenton is thinking rather than Stevens. But oddly enough, that is true in the book, too - even as the narrator, Stevens never lets anyone get through his reserve, which I guess is the point of the book.

Wyliefan
07-30-2012, 05:07 AM
I always think of Remains of the Day when people ask for names of movies that were as good as the books they came from. That adaptation was just brilliantly done.

IceAlisa
07-30-2012, 05:19 AM
Yes, the three I mentioned all have annotated versions by the same editor as P&P. And that's a great description of why I liked it so much, which is why I ordered them up so quick. I would have bought them on my vacation if I thought I had any room in my suitcase. I'm hoping that he's working on doing Mansfield Park and Northanger Abbey as well. And if he wouldnt be too much to ask, maybe some of Austen's shorter and/or unfinished works? (Although, that reminds me of my one quibble with the annotated P&P - he kept referring to Lady Susan as "unfinished" when it was clearly finished, just more of a novella rather than a full novel.)

I am so excited! Thanks for the heads up!!! :cheer2: I think I'd read annotated Austen anything.

Nomad
07-31-2012, 04:05 AM
Finished Invitation to the Waltz this evening. The plot is pretty slight: England, 1920. Awkward 17 year old Olivia from upper middle class family that is no longer affluent attends her first ball with her beautiful older sister Kate. Her dress turns out to be a disaster (Lehmann's brief portrait of the incompetent village seamstress is touching) but can't be fixed in time; her dance card isn't full; her escort turns out to be a dud; Kate, their vivacious cousin Etty, and the equally vivacious Marigold (whose coming out ball it is) are generally not on hand for support. Olivia's left to fend for herself with dance partners who turn out to be a conceited ass, a drunk, a blind war vet, a dirty old man, and so on. Lehmann captured it all beautifully. Next up, as a nice, light palate cleanser, E. M. Delafield's Diary of a Provincial Lady.